SURVEY CURRENT BUSINESS

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1 DECEMBER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Digitized for FRASER UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE WASHINGTON VOLUME 6 NUMBER 2

2 Digitized for FRASER CONTENTS Volume 6 of the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Special Articles No. Page Commodity Prices, Development of Retail Sales Indexes Progress of the Aeronautics Industry 3 6 Construction Trends and Related Factors 4 6 An Estimate of the Volume of Wholesale trade in the United States, Farm Equipment Business Recovers Rapidly Expansion in the National Income Continued in 7 4 Regional Sales of General Merchandise in Small Towns and Rural Areas 9 4 Progress of the Domestic Rayon Industry 4 Plastics Products of Ever-Widening Utility... 4 Summary of the Retail Census of 2 4 Tables of New and Revised Statistical Series Admitted assets of United States life insurance companies, Advertising, magazine, Annalist index of business activity, 923-August 2 Automobiles and visitors arriving at National Parks, Babbitt metal (white-base antifriction bearing metals): and sales, Brokers* loans, Construction contracts awarded in 37 States, by classes, 5 9 Corporation earnings indexes, unadjusted and adjusted, by quarters, Cost of living in the United States, by major items, Department store sales indexes, unadjusted and 9 9 adjusted, Earnings, weeklv and hourly, and hours of work (25 industries); July 94-June 92-August 7, 8,9 Employment in Iowa, Employment and average hourly wages Class I railways, July 92-August 2 Employment and pay rolls in manufacturing industries, 3-6 ; Employment and pay rolls, factory, Wilmington, Del., 923-August. 2 Employment indexes on Class I steam railways in the United States, Tables of New and Revised Statistical Series Continued; No. Page Failures, commercial, by divisions of industry, Federal Home Loan Bank Board lending activities, by agencies, Futures, total volume of trading (wheat and corn), Gas, manufactured: Customers, sales, and revenue, Gas, natural: Customers, sales, and revenue, Income of Class I steam railways, Internal revenue collections from specified sources, July Internal revenue tax receipts from sale of products (future delivery), Interest rates charged customers by banks in principal cities, Life insurance written, - 7,8 Life insurance premium collections, -July 9 Lumber:, shipments, and stocks, Obligations fully guaranteed by the United States, amounts outstanding by agencies, 3-May 7 2 Powdered milk production, Prices, foodstuffs and raw materials, indexes, Profits of corporations, Reconstruction Finance Corporation, loans outstanding, Reserves above legal requirements of reporting member banks of the Federal Reserve System, -June 7 2 Sales of stocks and bonds on all registered exchanges and on the New York Stock Exchange, Securities effectively registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Stocks of grain, 927-April 6 9 Stocks of foodstuffs and raw materials, indexes, Total visible stocks of silk, 923-June 7 2 Weekly business indicators, ,6 Yields on 2 common stocks (weighted average),

3 Digitized for FRASER UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DANIEL C. ROPER, Secretary BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE ALEXANDER V. DYE, Director SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Prepared in the DIVISION OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH ROY G. BLAKEY, Chief M. JOSEPH MEEHAN, Editor Volume 6 DECEMBER Number 2 CONTENTS SUMMARIES AND CHARTS Page Business indicators 2 Business situation summarized 3 Graphic comparison of principal data 4 Commodity prices 5 Domestic trade 6 Employment 7 Finance 8 Foreign trade 9 Transportation Review of the Automobile and rubber industries Iron and steel industries 2 Textile industries 3 SPECIAL ARTICLE Summary of the retail census of Revised series: STATISTICAL DATA Admitted assets of United States life insurance companies, ; cost of living in the United States, by major items, 94-36; passenger automobiles and visitors arriving at national parks, annually, 99-32, monthly, 2-36; empl oyment in Iowa, , 9, 2 Weekly business statistics through 28 2 STATISTGAL DATA Continued Monthly business statistics: Page Business indexes 22 Commodity prices 23 Construction and real estate.. 24 Domestic trade 25 Employment conditions and wages 2 Finance 3 Foreign trade 36 Transportation and communications, 37 Statistics on individual industries: Chemicals and allied products 39 Electric power and gas 4 Foodstuffs and tobacco 42 Fuels and byproducts, 45 Leather and products 47 Lumber and manufactures Metals and manufactures: Iron and steel 49 Machinery and apparatus 5 Nonferrous metals and products., 52 Paper and printing 53 Rubber and products 55 Stone, clay, and glass products 56 Textile products 57 Transportation equipment r. 58 Canadian statistics 6 General index Inside back cover Subscription price of the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS is 3.5 a year. Single-copy price: Monthly, cents; weekly, 5 cents. Foreign subscriptions, 33, including weekly supplements. Make remittances only to Superintendent of Documents, Washington. D. C. 9 36

4 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Business Indicators = 25 5 \ \ INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION r \ A V Adjusted 25 5 FACTORY EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLLS \ \ \~> \ EMPLOrM Nr (Adjusted) K. *~ RAY'ROLLS ( ^Unadjusted) i i i I I i l I M FREIGHT CAR LOADINGS 25 \ i i i I i I I i i I HMll.f.U CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED 5 \ LCX. (Ad/t/sted)^ WTAL (Acijusted) * ^ ^ j! II i I i i I I i I i!! DEPARTMENT STORE. SALES 25 WHOLESALE i i i I i i In m I PRICES 5 s > TOTAL (Adjusted) 9 ^^ 5 \ N \ ALL CO MMOl/T/ES ^ a_ L,> * -**J *»+**r FARM PRODUCTS.^- ****** * ^ ^ ot Digitized for FRASER \ i i i i I I i I i i II I II I ) I FEDERAL RESERVE MEMBER BANK LOANS* TOTAL- T 'ALL OTHER L A/ i i i i i / I nrt i i i i i (Commercial) l i l t i iii i5or 25 5 ol! I II I M! I! BANK DEBITS OUTSIDE NEW YORK CITY \ V V I! I M II I I929! 3'3i '32'33 4!929'3'3l "hvll 4 ADJUSTED FOR SfASOA'AL VAR/AT/ON ^XERORT/NG MEMBER BANKS DO. 9 J.M

5 SURVEY OF CUKRENT BUSINESS Business Situation Summarized BUSINESS activity so far during- the final quarter has evidenced a continuation of the improvement which has characterized the current year. Industrial production has been sustained at the best level attained since 929, expanding employment has reduced the number without work, and the income of employees has been further increased; farmers' income is markedly higher than a year ago despite some recession on a seasonally adjusted basis from the high reached in midsummer; the volume of freight traffic has held at better than seasonal levels; and retail sales reports give promise of the best Christmas buying period in 7 years. The volume of manufacturing output in was seasonally larger than in. The major gain was in the iron and steel industry where the recovery peak of operations reflected continued advances in the machinery, railroad equipment, building materials, tools, and other capital goods industries, as well as the resumption of assemblies by leading automobile manufacturers. The consumers' goods industries generahv continued to operate at a high rate; textile mills are unusually active, although the seasonally adjusted index of production for this industry was lower than in. The disparity between the output of durable and nondurable goods is gradually being lessened and the situation at present is Year and month 929: : _ : 2:..,. 3:. 4: : : March April May... June July... August... Monthly average, through : 4 :! i Industrial production Unadjusted O SO MONTHLY BUSINESS INDEXES Adjusted : III Factory employment Freightcar and pay rolls loadings mploy ed J r of adju ls, ount of pa unadjust Monthly average, = [ 97! 92 ] i 9 i Total sted Adj considerably improved, not only in comparison with a year ago, but also with any period back as early as. During, there has been no evidence of a slackening of the pace of manufacturing activity. Automobile production is moving ahead rapidly and steel output is holding at a rate only slightly lower than in. Lumber production has declined as a result of the maritime strike which has tied up shipping activities on the west coast. Construction activity is still increasing, although weather conditions may be expected to hamper operations shortly. Privately financed building contracts through have not shown the customary seasonal decline. Current rates of operations in many industries and the rising trend of corporate earnings have focused increasing attention on the need for expanding production facilities. While building activity generally has been slow to recover, the lag in commercial, industrial, and public-utility construction, despite some progress this year, has been even more pronounced Prices of commodities throughout have been buoyant, reflecting the increased industrial demands as well as the tendency toward higher costs. The stock market has been exceptionally active during the month, but prices have made no further progress after moving higher for 6 months. Merchandise,. c.l. Adjus Retail sales value, adjusted epartment Rural, general merchandise = Foreign trade, value, adjusted 2 Imports h is a ction contra value, ad jus Cons ty Monthly average, = ' Cash farm income Unadjus Monthly average, = Digitized for FRASER Adjusted for number of working days.» Adjusted for seasonal variation. From marketings of farm products u 5 4 I 8 Monthly average, HO. 4

6 SURVEY OF CUKKENT BUSINESS Graphic Comparison of Principal Data BANK DEBITS OUTSIDE NEW YORK CITY (BILLIONS OF DOLLARS) i( 5H u > 2() 2,5 3 FIRST MONTHS V/////A REMAINDER OF YEAR ( INSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED (B/LL/ONS OF DOLLARS) J. \ c STEEL INGOT PRODUCTION (MILLIONS OF TONS) F - ( D = 929 AUTOMOBILE: j mm PRODUCTION- > -(MILLIONS or CARS) i V I i! FREIGHT CAR LOADINGS (MILLIONS OF CARS) WT//// ///A i Digitized for FRASER O.D. 638 JM

7 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Commodity Prices NOVEMBER witnessed the broadest advance in commodity prices since 3. With nearly every important group participating in the upward movement, the Bureau of Labor Statistics' weekly combined index of 7 price series stood at.6 on 28 (926 = ), or.7 percent higher than in the week ended 3. In this 4-week period raw materials advanced.5 percent; semimanufactures 4.6 percent; and finished products.5 percent. Conspicuous among the commodities showing advances were grains, livestock, foods, textile products, raw silk, wool, leather, hides, pig iron, nonferrous metals, and crude rubber a number of them reaching the highest figures in several years. Advances in steel prices on were announced also. The advance in wholesale prices was in rather sharp contrast with the practically sidewise movement of and. Most of the important industrial commodity groups advanced moderately in but the substantial price decline in the heavily weighted food group especially the sharp decline in meats offset the advances in the other 2.TOUP3. INDEXES OF COMMODITY PRICES Wholesale prices have continued to strengthen in most of the major foreign countries; sharp advances have occurred in those countries which have recently devalued their currencies. Farm prices generally changed relatively little in, but the Bureau of Agricultural Economics review suggests that most of them will probably advance seasonally during the next few months, though hog prices will probably rise more than seasonally while wheat may be affected by increased supplies from the Southern Hemisphere. The substantial price advances were not, of course, reflected in the National Industrial Conference Board's cost of living index issued the first of that month. This index declined.2 percent from to because of the.7 percent decline in retail food prices. Price advances were shown, however, by each of the other constituents of this index rents, clothing, coal, and sundries. Living costs were 3.3 percent higher than in, but 5.3 percent lower than in 929. Fairchild's index of retail prices of departmentstore articles advanced for the fourth consecutive month, reaching 9. Wholesale Prices (Department of Labor) Retail Trices Year and month 2 jjeconomic classes'!! Groups and subgroups i! 8 3 O Farm Grain* Foods Meats 8 g' Other prod i eri rt hit Monthly average, 926= 3' u e s 3 tin JS des and leai X a ouse-furn goods X S etals pro and due 3 is H iscelianeous 3 u n Mo. average, 923= SB l Ill ill Mo. average, 99-4 == Mo. average, = Is Dec. (Jan., ) = 2') -).,2: V) 4: No "^mbor_ :, March April... May June July _.. ; f> 8., 8.' 8.' 8. ( 8O. 79.i 79.' 7 78.' ! 8. 5» J { August ] 8. 6!. j 8. 6J.8 8.5:. Monthly average, I through ; j 4"..6! O J Digitized for FRASER Revised. See p. 2 of the 4 issue ! ! % 7 7 " 4 7 s i 85., 77.5ii 77.9! 85. li ! ! 94. 3! I 78.8! 97. 5j ! ! ! j i ! I IN 79. Oj i 8.. 7! ! j J 76.4! ! ! 73.9 j o! 79.9! ! J 76..2' ! ' S! S f ( S ^ s2 "> hi ()l s, :i 7 <) (>' SI 2l -^ 77 7 J !. 8..9! i j oj, 6 97 S 79 ( r i J 69.; i.4! ! !! l! ! '. 5! 2. 2 Middle of month This is a new series, see p Index is as of the st of the following month S i i.6.6!. 3. 2! S 69.7! o! ! !.4! ! 85.6! 85.9! s > 9 8 s !. 8. 7l 8. 6 i Jlh. i > 87.6 S

8 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS.-r Domestic Trade EXPANSION in retail sales has been one of the bright spots in the business picture in recent weeks. With the advent of the Christmas buying season sales have advanced sharply, and it is generally anticipated that this period will bring the largest volume of general merchandise sales since 929. In rural areas, sales may very well exceed the 929 totals, on a volume basis at least, since this Bureau's seasonally adjusted index of dollar sales of general merchandise in rural areas (based on figures of mail-order and rural chainstore sales) in was already above the 929 figure. Department-store sales, which reflect the trend of purchasing in the cities, are not expected to exceed the 929 figure in dollar volume, but with prices down about a fifth, the physical volume may well top the 929 results. Merchants and retail associations generally have been inclined to revise upward their estimates of the probable sales gain over a.year ago for the Christmas period and have been placing additional orders with the wholesalers and manufacturers on this basis. This more optimistic appraisal has been influenced to a considerable extent by the wave of year-end wage increases, bonus distributions, and extra dividends, which will afford an important sales stimulus missing in recent years. Such actions are of great importance to retailers because a considerable part of the funds, and particularly the wage increases, will flow into retail sales channels. Year and month 929: : : 2: 3: 4: : : March ' April May June July August Monthly average, through : 4.. Unad- just-! edi Department stores Sales Adjusted 2 For, the latest month for which actual sales data are available at this time, retail-store sales increased by more than the usual seasonal amount. The adjusted index of department-store sales advanced 2 points to 9, the best figure of the year with the exception of July, when the payment of the World War veterans' bonus was an important Influence. The percentage gain for department stores over, without allowance for the extra Saturday this year, was 6 percent, with the Cleveland, Chicago, St. Louis, and Dallas areas reporting increases of more than 2 percent. Sales through variety stores, while substantially above those of, increased from to by somewhat less than the usual seasonal amount. Sales of chain food stores increased moderately in comparison with a year ago. but these data indicate that a smaller proportion of the enlarged volume of consumer income is going for food purchases now than a year or two ago. A larger percentage of the income is being used for the purchase of luxury and semiluxury goods, and particularly for consumer goods of the durable type, such as furniture, mechanical refrigerators, and automobiles. Sales of the lastmentioned article for the balance of th*r year will be limited only by the ability of the manufacturers to make deliveries. A test of the actual market for the automobile industry will not occur until :be first half of the next calendar year. DOMESTIC TRADE STATISTICS Stocks«Unad- j Adjust- justed i ed 3 Monthly average, = S i Corrected to daily average basis. 8 Series revised. See note on p. 32. Digitized for FRASER Retail trade Chain-store sales Combined index* Avg. same mo = I Variety stores Unad- just- l ed» i Adjusted» I.5 I 9.9 " r ) Rural sales Unadjusted i General merchandise Adjusted i New passenger-car sales Unadjusted i Monthly average, = ; 96.8 i 4. ' 9.2, 97.7 ' 2. 4 : " S ; i.2! 99.2! i 6.2 I ,., ! ; : -!.4 9. S i ' Wholesale trade Adjusted* Employment Pay rolls Monthly average, 929 = 2, ! ,9 GO »Adjusted for seasonal variations.» End of month. < See note on p. 26 of this issue (. 6 (>5. m. 8 Commercial failures J ber,67 X39 :,56 8 9, fjl Failures Liabilities ] Thou-! sands of dolls , 973 7,85 4,3 5, 6 8,4 4, 6,27 4,57 5,3 9,77 9,94 8, i 9,4 97 i ' 2,343

9 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Employment EMPLOYMENT and pay rolls expanded further in, according to data regularly compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The rise in employment continued the succession of increases that have been reported each month since. Between mid- and mid-, 22, additional workers were engaged by various industries, and weekly pay rolls were $6,3, higher. In comparison with a year ago, employment in these industries has increased by more than,, workers. Though this figure does not measure the full extent of reemployment during the year, it may be noted that the number without private employment is still very large. In the absence of official data on the unemployed, the more than 6% million persons with active applications on file with the United States Employment Service give some indication of the probable size of this figure. The present upward trend of employment and pay rolls should extend at least through the end of the year, since the anticipated sharp gain in retail sales will require the employment of a large number of temporary workers. An additional factor bolstering pay rolls will be the wage increases recently announced b} r a large number of corporations, although the increases made so far affect only a small proportion of all wage earners. In accordance with the usual procedure, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has revised and adjusted the factory employment and pay-roll indexes to the latest available Year and month 929: : : 2: 3: 4: : : March April May June July... August Monthly average, through : 4 census data, i. e., those for 3. These adjustments have raised the indexes for years subsequent to 3 by relatively the same amount as the 3 figures are raised. Thus, for employment, the figure becomes 96.5 instead of 92. as it would be on the old basis, and the pay-roll index becomes.9 instead of.5. The revised indexes without adjustment for seasonal variation, which extend back to, will be published in the Supplement to the SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS. The indexes, adjusted for seasonal variation, will be given in the 7 issue. In this number the unrevised series are presented for the last time. In commenting on its general revision, the Bureau points out that the "* * * index shows that the declines in factory employment and pay rolls in all manufacturing establishments from to 3, as revealed by the Census of Manufactures, were not so great as those indicated in the monthly figures of the particular manufacturing establishments reporting to the Bureau of Labor Statistics in those years." Of the S9 manufacturing industries surveyed, 7 reported gains in employment in as compared with. Employment in the durable-goods industries was up 4 percent, employment in non-durablegoods industries was. percent lower. In addition to the substantial gain shown in factory employment, of the 6 nonmanufacturing industries from which data are regularly collected recorded gains in. STATISTICS OF EMPLOYMENT, PAY ROLLS, AND WAGES Factory employment and pay rolls Employment Unadjusted Adjusted' Pay rolls Monthly average, « / Adjusted for seasonal variation. Digitized for FRASER 3 National Industrial Conference Board. Anthracite mining i Unadjusted Employment Pay rolls , Nonmanufacturing employment and pay rolls (Department of Labor) Bituminous coal mining Em Em- Ploymerit Pay U rous Monthly average, 929= ' i t. ( 8.8. Em S S3! 2 7.4! I I 78.3 Retail trade j Pay rolls Electric light i j Telephone and power and telegraph and manufactured gas Employment Trade- Union mem- j bersem-i ployed Percent of total members Wages Factory» Average Average weekly hourly learnings earnings Dollars 2.6! 22.7 i I «Beginning 4 data compiled from Public Works projects, prior years from Federal aid and State projects Common labor rates (road building)* Cents per hour

10 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Finance ACOMBINATION of at least three important factors has stimulated the stock market to unusual activity during, although the price rise of recent months has not been extended. Increasing industrial earnings as reflected in initial dividends, the resumption of dividends, and increased dividend rates; the declaration of substantial extra dividends by numerous corporations under the apparent influence of the surtax on undistributed earnings under the provisions of the Revenue Act of ; and the marked interest of European and other foreign investors in the American market, partly because of political uncertainties abroad, all have concentrated unusual attention on share activity during recent weeks. In view of the comparatively small difference between United States receipts and payments on account of trade and service transactions in the balance of international payments, the net inflow of gold reflects in general the volume of foreign funds entering our security markets. During the first half of the net inflow of gold, including earmarking operations, aggregated $473,,, while the estimated net inward movement of short-term and long-term capital funds amounted to $4,,. Although the latter included the repatriation by foreigners of a substantial volume of foreign dollar bonds held in this country and possibly, to a small extent, the conversion into American securities of American-owned funds repatriated from foreign money centers, it is certain that the major part of the inward gold movement had its counterpart in the purchase by foreigners of American stocks and bonds. Since the middle of the year, the net inflow of gold (including I Bank i debits i outside New Year and month i York! City : r.v.;: : : 2: 3: 4: : -. j s :... _.i! March j April..._.! May i June! July I August i j Digitized for FRASER 32.22! 23, 679 8, ,27 4, 45 6,4 6,685 8, 676 7,499 5,7 7,7 7,497 6, ,67 7,6 7,5 m, m Reporting member banks, Wednesday i Federal closest to end of Reserve iexcess! month bank i reserves credit j of out- I member Loans "Oth- S In- stand- i on j vest- ments end of j end of Ing, i banks, 8e t " loansl month 9,79 8, 6") 5, i 3. 3, 63! 3,6 i 3,8! 3,2 3,28 j 3,7 i 3,33 3,34 3,4 i 3,39 3, 73 i 3, j 3, 79 ~3~3 3,34 3,4! 3,4 3, 34 3,?8 3, 4 3,5 3, 5 3, 9 3, , 949 3,2G5 'Net exports indicated by ( ). 5, 49 6, , 585 8, 569, 79 2, 476 2, 2,646 2, 996 3,47 3, 229 3,452 3, 522 4,59 4, 3, ,79G earmarking operations) has exceeded $45,,. Within our banking system the immediate effect of the continued gold imports has been an increase in the excess reserves of the member banks. From the middle of August, when an increase of 5 percent in member bank reserve requirements reduced excess reserves from $3,7,, on August 2, to $,3,-, on August 9, this excess has again steadily moved upward and stood at $2,27,, on 8. During the same period member bank loans especially nonsecurity loans have shown a steady increase while demand deposits of the weekly reporting banks increased more than $6,,. Continued ease in the money markets is reflected in the coupon rates stated in registration statements recently filed, and the rates on the new issues publicly offered. One large public-utility corporation which offered to the public in $5,, of debenture bonds on a yield basis of 3.9 percent has filed a registration statement covering the issuance of $,, of securities, also intended for refunding purposes. The first major refunding operation of Latin American bonds in the United States, to take advantage of prevailing interest rates, occurred in when a $23,5, issue of the Argentine Republic was offered with a 4^-percent coupon. The issue was priced at 92;^. Previously only one issue of dollar bonds of the Argentine Government had been floated in the United States at a rate under 6 percent. This was a $2,, issue in 928, offered at 97 with a coupon of ojo percent. FINANCIAL STATISTICS month j Millions of dollars.2 2, 2', 54 \) 2, 435 2, 4 2; 2, 4 2, 479 2,4 2, 473 2, , 473 2, 4 2, ,4<r> "4 M2 2 <<:o 3, ( 9 2, 3,8 2 t)64 i , 29 ' l,9'!.m 2,«>, Net gold imports including gold [released from earmark J r. 27 Money in circui lation , 643 5, 6 5, 427 5, 5, 77 5, 7 II ,779 5, 857 5, 2 5, 98 6, 6,23 I 6,9! 6, 258 6, m Savings deposits New York State 4, 372 4, 8 n 7 5, 6 5,54 5,87 5,77 5,77 5, 24 5, 5, 5,2 5, Postal Savings, IV;, 99,96,99,2,28,24,26,25,24,232,244, ,255 Stock prices (49) Standard Statistics ;l 926 = j Dollars :.3; I OS Bond prices, New York Stock Exchange (do- j mestic) ^2. "-:. 7 New capital Issues 92 «4,4 69 ' : 9, ,27 ll I Thous.'l of dollars j i 794,3 I ! 96.9 j 5V,.7(5 j 2, I , , , I 76, , j j 27, I 2,' I 26, I 78,9 i 73,694 2 Note that this column has been changed. See p. 32 for figures excluded. Aver- I age I divi- I dend per share (6 companies) Dollars ! I.35 i.4!.4.42 j Interest rates, I commercial j paper I (4-G months) Percent 2-4 %-2 l' H H IS it

11 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS THE large seasonal increase in exports, coupled with a contraseasonal decline in imports, resulted in a net export balance of approximately $52,, for the month which was sufficient to wipe out the merchandise import balance accumulated in the preceding 9 months and to provide an export surplus for the year to date of $2,,. With the exception of 4, the export balance was the largest for this month since. Compared with of last year, exports were 2 percent larger and imports 2 percent larger in value. Practically all agricultural exports increased seasonally in as compared with the results and, except for some of the fresh and canned fruits, reached higher totals than in. Approximately one-third of the gain in exports, when comparison is made with the corresponding month of last year, was the result of the increase in agricultural products. A substantial part of the remainder was accounted for by the increase in exports of manufactured articles, particularly metal manufactures, machinery, and vehicles. Exports of unmanufactured cotton were much larger in both quantity and value than in, and a like situation prevailed for tobacco, another leading agricultural export. Among the manufactured goods there were moderate increases over last 's figures in exports of electrical apparatus and office appliances, while exports of Foreign Trade EXPORTS AND IMPORTS industrial machinery increased from $,97, to $5,3,; agricultural machinery and implements from $2,244, to $4,253,; passenger automobiles from $3,, to $6,2,; aircraft, including parts, from $996, to $2,3,; and iron and steel manufactures from $,287, to $4,45,. The increase in passenger automobile exports was associated with the shift to the new models and was not primarily a reflection of an increased foreign demand, which so far during the current year has been only slightty larger than in the corresponding period of. In the months ending with, passenger automobile exports amounted to 32,54 units, valued at $,32,, and in the corresponding period of to 35,392 units, valued at $76,6,. In the import trade, noteworthy increases in over a year ago occurred in meats, butter, grains, feeds, fruits, nuts, cocoa, alcoholic beverages, crude rubber, flaxseed, unmanufactured wool, newsprint, tin, and fertilizers. The increases in crude rubber, grains, and alcoholic beverages were the most important in terms of value. The increase in the first four items mentioned, reflects, at least in part, the influence of last summer's drought. Among imports to show a decline in both quantity and A r alue were the following: Expressed vegetable oils, coffee, raw silk, copper, tallow, hides and skins, and undressed fur skins. Exports of United States merchandise Year and month 929: : : 2: 3: 4: :. _ : March April May -- June July August Cumulative, through : 4._. _. i Monthly average, = i Adjusted for seasonal variations. Digitized for FRASER 9 3 G , , 7. 2 i, ,739.5, ! i I ' Millions of dollars , '.2 Ji 27., \ 2 General imports through 3; imports for consumption thereafter j, j,697.6 H) m P, :J fifto ; 36.3! ' 4. i 36.! 37.6 I 38.5 I 43. I X 3 Monthly average of unadjusted indexes j> S.6

12 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Transportation SUSTAINED or expanding operations in a wide variety of individual industries, and the expansion in retail sales have been reflected in a relatively high level of freight traffic during. In the first 3 weeks of the month daily average loadings declined only slightly from those of the preceding month; usually with the passing of the autumn peak in loadings decline rapidly through the end of the year. Cold weather in many sections of the country which has stimulated coal shipments, and the maritime strike on the Pacific coast which has possibly resulted in the diversion of some freight to the railroads, are temporary conditions influencing recent movements. The major fact or, however, is the trend of general business activity, and more particularly the improvement in the soc ailed ''heavy' 7 industries which provide a relatively large proportion of freight traffic. In loadings stood at 73 percent of the average, on a seasonally adjusted basis, compared with. 4 in 929. Thus, while improvement during the current year, as revealed by the table below, has been significant, the recovery since 3 has been much slower than that for any other industry of comparable magnitude, with the exception of the construction industry. The slow recovery in building is one of the reasons for the lag in freight traffic, although it is by no means the only one, and not necessarily the most important one. Tear and month 929: :..., : 2: 3: 4:,..- :.., _ :. March April May June July... August Monthly average, through : 4... " F. R. Index -I! Total Unad- I Adjustedijjusted' Monthly average, =» RAIL AND WATER TRAFFIC Freight-car loadings Coal and coke. 5.3 il 23.! Q A. 3! i 7. j 64.7 li i Daily average basis. Adjusted for seasonal variations 56. ' 92. : 2.5 ' 8.2! 9.6 : 4.9! 7.2 I ; 6S. 7! For- Grain products j and j Liveprod- stock ucts Thousands of cars II : j i ij i i; 38.5; "> Based on the reports of roads which in accounted for 79 percent of all operating revenues, the estimated increase in railroad revenues over the same month a year ago is 5.5 percent. If the final figures show the same proportionate gain, total revenues will be the largest for any month since. Net profit after fixed charges amounted to $26,46, in, and this figure should be substantially bettered in. Net profit for the first 9 months of the year amounted to $42,79,, compared with a deficit of $,8, in the same period of. The Interstate Commerce Commission has set 6, 7, as the opening date for the hearings on the proposed upward revision of basic rates on certain commodities. Since the present emergency surcharges are due to expire on 3, the railroads have asked for an extension of these charges pending the decision on their petition. Hearings on the extension of the temporary surcharges are scheduled to start on. Equipment buying increased in the latter part of, with the result that through the 28th 53 locomotives and,26 freight cars were purchased. Locomotive orders were far above those of any month in recent years, while freight-car orders were somewhat below the level of last summer. For the year to date, orders for freight cars were the largest since 929 and locomotive orders the largest since. Mer- I chan-i dsse Ore I. c I ! , j , , ! ! ! ! car Mis- j surplus eel- j i American vessels, both directions 4 Average weekly basis Pullman passengers carried Thou- I sands 2,72 2, 278,6, 58, 256, 2,278,246,49, 536,359,32,353,2,43,56,5, 59 8, 26 6, 2»,43 Financial statistics, class I railways Oper- Netrailating wayopreve- j crating nues i income Thousands of dollars, 3 478, 3 359, 37 2, 294, ,9 5, 87,923 63,, 7 57, 3 49, , 39, 454 3,33 54, , ,4 299,99 S9, , 34 33,4 32, 9 33, , 4 35, , 27 39,457 2,78 285,2 332, 92 35, 7 33,5 35, 26 4, 5 4,2 5, , 68 7,,85 39, , 6 52, 4 Sault Ste. Marie Canal traffic New York State Thousands of short tons,23 9,94 6, 2 3, 924 7,54 5,6 7,454 4, ,7 9,5,,699,4,7 5 Average. April. 6 9 months' average Panama s Thous. of long tons,344,33 723,, I 3 j 852 S ,67 « , 252 «56 «8. 8 I « , ,58,

13 L9>W SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Automobiles and Rubber SSEMBLIES of automobiles is again in full swing A'-with production during at a rate in excess of, vehicles weekly. The present pace is likely to hold at least until the end of the year, as the stocking of field organizations with the new cars is as yet far from complete, and a large volume of orders have been accumulated by retailers. With the slow start of several manufacturers on the new models, total production in increased less than the computed seasonal allowance; the month's output fell short of the figure by nearly 5, vehicles. production totals will rise sharply and no doubt more than seasonally as compared with. Interest at the moment is centered in the reception of the new models at the automobile shows being held throughout the country. Reports from all such displays record increased attendance and orders, as compared with the results of a year ago, which augur well for the opening of the 7 selling season. Sales organizations expect to benefit from the continued expansion of purchasing power and, more particularly, from the unusually large number of special wage and dividend distributions which will undoubtedly exercise a stimulating influence on sales of such products as automobiles which require individual expenditures of considerable size. Although no radical changes in either bodies or motors were made in this year's models, all manufacturers offer improvements designed to afford greater values. For this reason it is difficult to draw price comparisons between the and 7 models, but certain general tendencies are evident. Cars in the high-price bracket are generally lower in price, while for the medium-price class changes are mixed. In the low-price group the tendency is toward higher quotations, although these are offset by the inclusion of additional equipment, and the statement has to be modified to the extent that one major producer offers a car with a smaller-sized engine at a lower price than the regular line. Domestic production of all motor vehicles in the first months reached 3,56, units. With an indicated production for the final 2 months of the year at least equal to that of the corresponding months of, total production for the current calendar year will approach 4,4, vehicles. The recovery in the automobile industry is epitomized by the statement that one leading corporation has declared in dividends per share this year an amount equal to more than twice the price of the share at the depression low for the stock in 2. Increased activity in the rubber-manufacturing industry in was only partly the result of the expansion in tire plants. There was a substantial increase in activity in boot and shoe and mechanical rubber goods factories also. AUTOMOBILE AND RUBBER STATISTICS Automobile production j Autorno bile exports Registrations New passengercar sales Pneumatic tires * Crude rubber Year and month F.R. index,! Total adjusted United States Canada Passenger cars 3 Trucks ( Total i Passenger Trucks New passenger cars New commercial cars Unadjusted Adjusted Domestic shipments Domestic consumption, total Imports World stocks, end of month Monthly av., I I 923- >, Thousands 25=! Number Monthly average, = Thousands Long tons 929;... :. :... 2:.., 3:... 4:... : -.. :... March... April... May June July August.. Monthly average, through Oct.. 4 l)3(\ s 96 j 5! 7.'i i [ SO !! j 27 7 ' n i ,687 j 4,5 i 2,727 3,5 j 29, i 47,9, 58,733 j 58,45 6,56 j,73!,79 j 77,4 85,642 i,58 [ 77,6 68,597 6,537 I 44,533 ' 33,94 j 49,87 57,54,234 ' 4,.323! 4,54, , fi 3, 73 8,273 3,49 i 3,7 3,32! 3,568 8,2 24, 2,6 6,4,4 4, , 38,246 4, 56 3, 9, 7,36 3,27, 733 5,96 8, 4 7,47 22,49 7, 736 5,7 6,46 8, 92 7,723 7, 727 4, 987 2, 8,323 4, 564 9,4 2, 7 3,345 3, 677,52 4,79 4, 5 2,549 5,567 7,52 7,9 8,38, 276 9,787 9, 9,999 8,33,8 9, 55 9,8 7,45 6,3 6,6 7, 85 8,77 8,5 2,7 5, 29 2, 9 63, 36, 4, 7, 3 22, 2 237,94 25, 7 76, 8 3, ,9 392, 369, ,49 2, 92 28, 6 7,39 7, , ,37 49,87 34, 25 24, 6 5,57 28, 58 43, ,243 37, 38, 43,76 4, 3 5,87 57,, 56, 63, 6 59,222 54,6 4,27 35, 5 44, 29 52, , ,6 2,8 2,379 2,55 2,3 3, 3,28 3,238 3,2 3,79 2,8 2,947 3,2 4,27 4,544 4,427 4, 4,35 * 3, ,878 ^3,2 3,52 2,63 2,85,385, 943 2,4 3,258 3,7 3,3 3,79 2,545 3, 3,97 4,9 4,6 4,599 3,978 3,53 * 3, 4 3, 4 3,725 3, 32 25, 2, 4 9, , 8 28, ,92 38,5 38,6 43, 5 33, 7 38,433 46, 77 45,434 47, ,72 45,257 45,43, 59 34,2 37,4 43, 7 38,454 46, 3 4,398 35, 46,34 29, 24 36,378 26,73 39, 33,2 34,339 34, 8 45, 37,5 38, ,45 4, 7 5, 33 4,9 4, 724 4,5 38,352 39, 7 4,964 5,873 69, , , 5, 2,3 6,987 6, ,355 5, ,5 533,4 5, 5, ,439 5, 5 4, 673, 6 676, ,6 i Adjusted for al variations. «Covers varying percentages of industry, see note on p. 55. * Includes taxicabs, see footnote on p. 59. * 9 months' average. Digitized for FRASER

14 2 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Iron and Steel THE important event of the past month in the steel industry was the announcement by leading producers of a general wage increase, the first upward readjustment of wage scales in 2){ } r ears. This action affects a half million or more workers and is expected, when fully effective, to result in an increase in aggregate pay rolls of the industry of about percent. In some instances, the wage increases were accompanied by the offer of a sliding scale arrangement for adjusting wages in the future, based on the movement of the cost of living index, but this plan has not met general acceptance. This wage advance will establish the pay scale in the steel industry above that prevailing prior to the depression, and certainly will represent the highest real wages ever paid by the industry. Average hourly earnings in the iron and steel industry, which had declined from through the first half of 3, have advanced now for more than 3 years. During the earlier period the average hourly earnings, as measured by the monthly data collected b} r the National Industrial Conference Board, dropped from about cents to between 45 and 5 cents. Prior to the general wage increase, the average hourly rate had reattained the level, so that the recent action will establish the hourly earnings well above the 929 average. The action of the companies was possible by reason of the very marked improvement in steel production Year and month 929: : : 2: 3: 4: : _... j _ J :... March... April. May June July August Monthly average, through : General operations [, ad- I justed Employment, adjusted' Monthly average, = IRON AND STEEL STATISTICS I.8 j this year which has caused profits to rise fairly rapidly. Profits of 7 producers, with 9 percent of the country's ingot capacity, for the first 3 quarters of the year, are reported by the magazine "Steel" at $85,5,, compared with $24,4, in the same period of. It was pointed out, however, that profits this year have been much less than in when production and prices averaged about the same. Insofar as prices are concerned, current quotations are above those prevailing throughout most of when prices were declining. This year the composite price line of 25 iron and steel products crossed the line in July, and the spread has since widened considerably. of both pig iron and steel ingots during was the largest in more than 6 years. Daily average output of pig iron rose to 96,52 tons, compared with 9, in and 63, a year ago, and 6 more furnaces were in blast at the end of the month than at the end of. Steel-ingot output at 68,333 tons daily was at the rate of 76.7 percent of capacity. On a seasonally adjusted basis, it was about 7 percent above the output. The weekly estimates of production for indicate a decline for the current month of less-than-seasonal proportions. The fourth quarter output will almost certainly compare favorably with that of the preceding quarter, although the price advance for the first quarter has had some influence on both sales and production. Iron and steel Pig iron Steel Ingots j Steel sheets» Thousands of long tons jl 38 i GO , 5 2,,73 645,356 i,978 ; 2, I 2,6 j 2,26 I,4 2,4 2,44 I 2,6 j 2,5 I 2,594 I 2,72 2, 73, 3, 6 2, 456 Pay rolls, unadjusted Exportports Im- Furnaces in blast i 4 I 4,534 2, 6,59, 87 2, 85,4 3,43 3,5 3,73 3,46 2,964 3,343 3,942 4,46 3, 985 3, 923 4, 4, i, 545 2,22 2,72 Thou Number I! of sands long tons Percent of capacity New orders Shipments j Thousands of i short tons I ! S i 5 47! 98! 67 29! n United States Steel Corpo-j ration, j finished products, shipments 7.6 I ,7 572, 7 343,9 6, 68,,55 72, 44 j 676,35 I 7,552 I 979,97 I 9,97 I 6, I,85 923,73 24! 9, 224,7,47 54 : 54,2 92 I I Prices Steel and steel, composite' ISessemer (Pittsburgh) Finished cago) I com- posite Dollars Dollars per long ton per :pounds so' h ; 3. : ; ; i I ^8 34. ]. r, U i ; i Adjusted for seasonal variations. 2 Black, blue, galvanized, and full finished. 3 See table on p. 9 of the issue. Digitized for FRASER ; 4.3 : s.oo e , ' 3S j i'. 4

15 Decem ber SURVEY OF CURKENT BUSINESS 3 Textile Industries OTTON and rayon textile mills operated at a high C rate in. Cotton manufacture is exceeding the 929 rate and, with a large backlog of orders, a high level of operations appears to be assured for some weeks to come. Cotton-spindle activity and cotton consumption in were slightly lower on a daily average basis than in, but the decline was not significant in view of the expansion in the preceding month, Raw cotton prices have been well sustained despite the official crop forecast of 9 which forecast an output larger than the previous estimate by 79, bales. Prices of gray and finished goods have advanced sharply during. In the rayon industry, operations have been at practical capacity for several months. Declines in deliveries from the mills since the record high set in August have reflected the dwindling of producers' stocks which contributed heavily to deliveries in earlier months, rather than any decrease in production. At the end of, stocks were as low as a month earlier, amounting to only about 9 days' supply on the basis of average monthly shipments during the last 2 months. Being unable to fill current orders, producers are allotting a uniform percentage of each buyer's requirements. In the third quarter, production of viscose and cupra rayon (nonacetate) reached a new high of 55,6, Year and month 929: : : 2: 3: 4: : _ : March April May June July... August _._ Monthly average, through : 4 index, adjusted^ Monthly average, la 3 8 Cotton, raw Mill consumption Running bales 639, 9 443, 2 46, ,55 523, , 52,32 499, ,4 55,977 55, , , , 56 5,2 9, , ,7 463, , 778 Spindle activity, total Millions of spindle hours 9,6 6,243 6,598 7,53 7,256 7,2 7,437 6,8 6, 7,79 6,735 7,254 7,33 6,6 7,32 7,855 7,573 8, 8,338 6,296 6,23 7,57 TEXTILE STATISTICS Cotton manufactures Cotton cloth, finishing Print goods Thousands of yards 34,3, 5 2,292,3 97, ,87 7,8 4,7 5, 4,63, 94 4,7 7, 76 3,49 27, 344 8,423 4, 26, 3 97,972 97,33 4,72, 528 9,, 2 9,, 58 9, 338 9, 273 9,57, 54 3,49 96,45 9, 643 Plain bleached Wholesale price, cotton goods Monthly average, 926= Wool Consumption * Thousands of pounds pounds, according to the Rayon Organon. For the first 9 months of the year, production was 8 percent above that of the corresponding period of, and with acetate production estimated at percent more than last year, total rayon production for the 3 quarters is indicated at 24,, pounds compared with,, pounds in the same period of. Output of the woolen mills also increased in according to the data on machinery activity. Both looms and spindles were operated more intensively. Wool consumption, however, declined in instead of increasing as is customary at this period, so that the adjusted index for the industry dropped slightly. Silk deliveries declined in, but on an adjusted basis, compared favorably with those of earlier months of the year. The Federal Reserve production index, which combines the data for the above-mentioned industries with the exception of rayon, indicated operations only slightly below those of. However, since output usually advances at this time of year, the seasonally adjusted index receded 6 points to 4 (923^ 25=). The index advanced during the June- August period, leveled off in and, with the decline, is at about the same level as in. Wool manufactures Spinning spindles Looms Nar- Broad Percent of active hours to total reported Woolen Worsted Wholesale price, woolen and worsted goods Monthly average, 926= Silk Deliveries to mills Bales of 33 pounds Wholesale price, raw, Japa- nese,3-5 (New York) i Adjusted for seasonal variations. * Grease equivalent; see note on p months' average. Digitized for FRASER , 352 4, 9 42, 99 42,423 5, 37 34, 78, ,9 73,367 73,98 64, 53, 46 55, , 5 54,533 68,78 63,449 6, 763,68 3, 43 68,855 6, ,4 6,7 56, 8 53, 73 28, 52 49,6,67 37, 2 35,559 38, 9 32, 53 36, 34,564 32,87 3,437 36,8 42,6 45, 79 43, 38, , Dollars per pound Rayon Deliveries from mills Un- ad- Justed Ad- Justed i Daily average, = Hosiery Thousands of dozen pairs 9,564,5, 2 8,98,69 9,252 9,2, 2 9, ,9,, 8 3 8, ,97 3 9, 8

16 Digitized for FRASER 4 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS *: Summary of the Retail Census of WITH the completion of the census, comprehensive data on retail sales are now available for 3 of the past 7 years. Thus, it is possible to determine not only the extent of the decline from 929 to the approximate low point of the depression, but also to measure the recovery since 3 in the aggregate and by different kinds of business. The two preceding census compilations provided a wealth of marketing information which, among other things, has afforded the basis for the development of more adequate current indexes of retail sales. Our knowledge of consumer purchasing has thereby been enhanced, and the present census affords another bench mark for testing the representative nature of the current series; it will also further research which will provide new material along Table. Summary of Retail Trade, by States, -35 these lines as well as essential data for aji types of marketing research. In this article, the summary figures hom the preliminary census report have been assembled in a form which permits a quick comparison of the totals. These data are presented by States and by kinds of business. The accompanying map reveals the comparative increases, by States, from 3 to as well as the decline in both of these } r ears from the 929 results. Total Sales in 3 Percent Above 3. Total retail sales of $32,79,267, already reported in were 3 percent in excess of the total reported in 3. The largest relative geographical gains were in the Mountain and Pacific States, these two divisions State Number of stores Net sales Thousands of dollars 929 = Per-capita sales (dollars) t Active proprietors and firm members Employees i.fuh and part time), average for the year Total pay roll (thousands of dollars) 3 3 j ' 3 9c»v i 9o8 :J5 United States V, 526,9, 649,8 25,37, , 79, ,5,34 j, 5, 94 3, 433, 2 3,9t 27 2,9,445 3,568,398 Alabama Arizona _ Arkansas California Colorado * Connecticut - Delaware District of Columbia.- Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois i Chicago * Indiana Iowa.- Kansas Kentucky. Louisiana Maine _. - Maryland * Massachusetts Michigan _ - - Minnesota Mississippi M issouri * Alontana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York J New York City } North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon _ Pennsylvania Rhode Island.-- South Carolina South Dakota _- Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont. _.. Virginia Washington West Virginia... Wisconsin Wyoming 2, 49 4,9 5,98, 554 3,7 22,47 3,42 6,56 2, , 68 5,39 98,87 44, 599 4,256 34, , , , 239,429 23, 7 52, 43 57,2 33, 879 4, , 247 6,732 9,22,463 6,368 64,9 4,246 78,64 97, , 2 7,98 85, 96 26, 434 3,769 5,685 8, 438 5, 528 8, 5 22, ,94 5,3 4,4 26, 45 22, 37 7,28 44,563 3,69 22, 5,6 8, 276,9 4,259 24,377 4,292 6,427 24, ,853 97, ,78 42,423 38,2 27,38 29,254 23,47 2, , 5 55, 6,7 37, 397 5, 6 5, 35 7,928 8,96, 4 7, 67, 739 4,78 24,9 5,27 29, 438 9,5, C76 25, 5, 35 29,4S 9, 37 6,64 9,573 27, 443 7, , , , 97 8, , 49 25, ,,692, , 4 43, , 9 24, ,96 87,46,728, 99, 569, , 6 329,78 34, 264,23, 3 3, 3,,6 949,37 585,2 4,855 9,25 2,3 2, ,799, 6, , 739, 992 2, 245,8 363, 8,87,442,32 34, 7 224, 447,876,9 67, 2, 25 6,96 33, 79 9, 5 9,968 78, 6 358,2 368,7 244,7 3, 2 55, ,27 6, ,87 2, 32, 2, , 63 73, 327, , 249 4,687 39,536 2,77, 222,32, 699 7, ,2 445,2 3, , , 449, 253, 7, 5, 3, 59 85, 4 77, 27 92,5, 358, , 7 5,52, 25, , 5 4, 579, 85 2, 685, ,5, 9, , , 38 2, 497,7 27, 5 246, 77 46,78 4, 73, 2, 3,24 98, ,63 524, 76 33,269 8, 59, ,292 i 2,76 5,39 4,8 7,9 8,58 94, 3, 2 4, 5 3,229 2,69 2,23 3,2 3,876 5, 56 4, 22, 3 2, 6 28,79 28,2 5, 526 5,347 99, 7,38 42, 37, 8 44,6 39, 98 37, ,44 29, 26,38 27,6 28,87 22, 2, 3 2,4,3 24, 3 2,55 47, , , , ,96 35, 3 6,79 4, , 4 47,455 7, 7,3 2, 9 7,99,49,57 6, 58 6, , 4 58, 9 4,63 4,63 73,77 8,44 92, , , 298 8,39 8, 4,96, , 245 5, 47 4,492 8,67 7,267 8,27 7,6 6,97 4, 8 8,87 8, 9 24, 6 26, 72, 43 68, 397 5,69 4,998 5,224 4, , 35 23, 8 23, 23, 33 7,6! 6,978 46, 577 i 4,979 3, 497 3, ,6 9,85 42, , , ,92 32,439 33,78 55, ,8 7,563 8,64 32, 4,527 42, 7 54,426 56, 8,878 9,9 2, ,8 259,7 5,22,76 85, 57 97, , 78 46, 6 52, , 35, 3 43, 35 49, ,47 24,56 55, 32 58,8, 385, ,6,7 78, 32 92,33 2, ,597 2,9 3,5 7, ,52 4, 945 3, 4,38 3, 469 6,92 9,733 36, 342 6,5 9,24 449,4 53,9 27,28 3,26 53,8 6,5, 4,37 2,4 24,969, ,6 28, 7 34,99 2, 9 36,35 23, , 52 27, 6 32, 9 3,7 5, 52 47, 8 6, , ,253 2,8 6, 559 9,54, 5,9 57, 99 5,3 56, 3, 36, 9, 238 t ,55 23,7 8,455 5, ,5 27, 53,5 6,33 33,68 3,85 35,763 7,94 22,323 4,47 63,35 47,2 32, 3,22 3,4 8, 45, 77 56,224 8,969 64,7 3, 27 9,, 28, 343 3,37,377 9,927 fi, , ,534 35, 9,3 72,264 34,9 24,64 227,269 2,242 6,96 9, 3 33, 564 3,4,979 9, ,385 28,,4 7,76 43,29 45, 69-46,3 2,57 249, , 55,59 39,542 36, 36,559 2, 5,35 8, 4 35,772 8,426 6, 63, , 98 4,787 4,7 ',4,32 8, f,5,26 35, 44, 2, ,325 33, , 33 27,26 22, 4,945 46,87! ',72, , 8,698 4, ,2 W>,6 j 24,47 3,4 «67,53!,45 5,777 7,343 i incomplete. Field canvass is contini ting and adciitional schedules wi be included in final report. i The material in this article was assembled by II. Lasken of the Division of Economic Research from the data presented in Retail United States Summary, issued by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.

17 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 5 showing increases of 47 and 39 percent, respectively. Most of the States in these areas showed a more than average decline from 929 to 3, but the subsequent recovery in sales was also sharper, so that in all but two cases (Colorado, for which data are not yet complete, and Arizona) sales in in comparison with those of 929, were at or above the average. West North Central States, with the exception of Minnesota and Missouri, experienced a more than average decline from 929 to 3 and only about an average increase from 3 to. A like situation prevailed in Arkansas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas. States east of the Mississippi show wider variations from State to State than are evidenced in the West. A true appraisal of sales in this large group of States cannot be made until final reports are available for New York and Illinois. One pertinent observation is that the District of Columbia has most nearly approached the 929 level of sales. Sales in were within 3 percent of the 929 value figure and undoubtedly were in excess of the 929 volume. 2 With the completion of the final report on retail trade, which is expected in the coming month, the totals for will be raised somewhat, with the more important changes in the States of Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, Missouri, and New York. However, such increases will not materially affect the trends that may be observed on the basis of present available figures. Notice must be taken of the fact that a small number of concerns which reported in 3 will not be included in the final data for because of their refusal to report. The Bureau of the Census was unable to get these reports because of the absence of legislation making such reports mandatory,*other than in regular census years. On a per-capita basis, sales increased from $99 in 3 to $257 in, with all States reporting higher per-capita sales. The South, in general, showed the lowest per-capita sales, the South Atlantic and South- Central States (except for Maryland, Delaware, the District of Columbia, and Florida) being below the United States average in both years. The District of Columbia leads the country, with per-capita sales of $445 in 3 and $55 in. The smallest percapita sales in both years were those reported for the State of Mississippi. Sales by Kind of Business. In considering the data presented in table 2 it is important to keep in mind the method of classification employed in compiling these data. Sales by land of business represent the total sales of stores whose chief line of activity is indicated by the title of the classification. Numerous shifts of classification of individual establishments by reason of changes in the predominant elements in their sales, have affected the comparability of certain of the minor classifications, but by grouping those between which shifts may be expected to occur because of classification, significant results are obtainable. Of the major classifications, food stores have the best comparative record from the standpoint of dollar volume of sales. In 3 dollar sales were 63 percent of the 929 figure, while sales represented 77 UNDER EACH STATE THE ARRANGEMENT IS AS FOLLOWS: B33 SAL 5 /N PERCENT OF 92$ SALES ALE5 IN PERCENT OF 929 SALES. UNITED STATES 5 67 PERCENT INCREASE, 3-335: 3% Percentage Increase in Retail Sales by States, 3-35, With Relatives Showing the Changes in Comparison With 929. Digitized for FRASER PERCENT INCREASE IN SALES, TO TO 4 4 TO AY O/ER CD. 69/7

18 Digitized for FRASER 6 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS percent of the 929 total. Eating places, with comparable figures of percent and 78 percent, and drug stores with 63 percent and 73 percent, may also be included with the more important groups which have fared relatively well. The seemingly fine record of fuel and ice dealers must be counterbalanced by the very poor record in building materials. These groups, which include many dual-line stores, must be considered as a unit for purposes of comparison, because the precipitous decline in building materials, in many cases, would shift a store into the other classification and might yield an increase even though there was actually a decline in total sales. The continued decline in the number of cigar stores and stands, and their smaller total and per-capita sales, are not measures of the movement of sales of tobacco and tobacco products. Rather, they represent a shiftin consumer purchasing habit, which has reduced the proportion of tobacco sold in specialty shops, and increased the proportionate share of department, drug, and grocery stores. Per-capita sales showed their largest increase in the automotive line, with motor-vehicle dealers increasing their per-capita sales from $7 to $3 in the 2-year period. Food-store sales, always the largest item in this classification, increased materially from $54 to $. Table 2. Summary of Retail Trade, by Kind of Business, 3-35 NOTE. Comparisons are subject to qualification by reason of a number of unavoidable shifts between classifications. Principal causes are: () More complete information in than in 3, permitting more accurate classification of individual stores; (2) the policy of classifying dual-line stores according to the principal commodities sold; and (3) changes in the character of the business resulting from changes in consumer demand. There has been a marked increase since 3 in the sales of apparel, furniture, hardware, building materials, farmers' supplies and motor vehicles. Retailers selling any of these commodities in substantially equal proportion to other major commodities are quite likely to have changed the relative proportions of the sales of such commodities since 3, and consequently the classification of their stores, even resulting in some cases in shifts from one major group to another. Kind of business Number of stores Net sales I Amount '. i (thousands of dollars) 929=! Employees (full _i Per-capita sales! Active proprietors j and part time), I (dollars) i and firm members j average for the!! ; year Total pay roll (thousands of dollars) United States, total., 526, 9 j, 649, 8 25, 37, , 79, 267 Food stores 47,49 53, 7 Grocery stores (.without meats) 63, 538, 2 Combination stores (groceries and fresh ' meats)! 4,372,552 Meat markets (in-! eluding sea food) j 38, , 4 Other food stores j 27, 8 37,34 Beer and liquor stores (packaged) i 3,767 2,63 General stores (with food)^j 85,9 I,5 General merchandise I group 49,72 44,78 Dry goods and general j merchandise stores.. 34,22 j 28,5 Department stores 3,544 4,24 Variety, 5 and, to-! I a-dollar stores 2,46,92 Apparel group i,5,47 Men's stores \ 9,49 2,785 Family clothing stores.: 5,7 7,87 Women's ready-to- j wear, stores! 7,9 2,9 Shoe stores 8,6 8, Other apparel stores.. 24, , 46 Automotive group 34,999 6,553 Motor-vehicle dealers (new and used cars). 3, ,7 Garages,454!, Other automotive 7,9 5,353 Filling stations 7,44 96,649 Furniture, household, radio 42,976 45, Household appliance! and radio stores j 9, 4, 26 Radio dealers 8,72 4,39 Furniture stores and j floor -coverings,! drapery stores j 9,573] 9,63 Other home furnish-] ing stores 5, 7,63 Lumber, building, hardware 76,98 72,7 Lumber and building material dealers! 2,5 2,39 Hardware stores 22, 4 26, 6,776,28 8,38,326,,242 2,22,64 3, 2, 42 49, 8, 28,3 6, 73, 97,437 3,, 272 8, 45 2,544,96 I 678, 67, 923, 333 4, 4 85, , , , 8 2, /, 525 2,27, 72 59,7 239,978 i,53,724 Hardware and farm implement dealers..] 9,8 9,58 j 77, Other building and i j hardware 22,28 5,24 j 25, Eating places 7,434! 53,232,324,387 Drinking places I 29,9 j 97,852 5,55! Drugstores 58,47! 56,59,,252 Farmers' supply stores... j 2,644 j 2,23 463,344 Second-hand stores j 2, 9! 22, 57 5, 2 Other stores j 4,372! 8,454,546,63 Cigar stores and! \ stands 2, j 5,34!,6 Fuel and ice dealers... 23, 8 I 35,76 j 3, 77 Jewelry stores 4,33 j 2.39, Florists i 7,728 i,2,4 All other kinds I 38,28 I 44, ,78, 2, 464,53 7,3 I 5, ,23,92 i. 69,45,3,368 I i,99,79 52,3 3,4, , 363 2, 598, 25,37 359, , 85 49, , 58 4, 6, 564 3, ,44 3,26, 96, 78 37, 63 57, , , 254, 687, 342,, 7, , 46 3, 32, 6 4, 552 2, 8 232,,, , 996, 226, , 35 22, 47, 997, L, 5 233, 98, 642, ,423, , I I '~63."lT , 5, 34 4, 99 6,26 I I 42, S ,55 42, , ! 43,6 35, ,3 77, 79 9, 55 5,64 6, 5 4, 46 22, , ,3, 7, ,45 39, 3 4, 2,69 5,73 72, 54 3, 2 25, 78, 22,! 98,29! 33,9 I m23,68,6 2,326 23,324 4; 37 8, ,326,5,94 3,433,2 3, 9, 927 4, ,3 j 738,999 7,356 i 44,87 i 55,3 47, ,234 3, 6 8,97, 72 32, 43 25, , 73, 273 7,55 6,5 7, 33, , 49 3, 222 7, 57,356 79,8 35,»28 4,29 39,47 j 357,22 47, , 543,63, 597 5,76, 228 6, 325 8,8 6, , 94, ,45 55, ,42 5,57 27, C6, 2, , 7 326, 56 23, 3 92, 23 3, 9 7, 58, 4 47, 773 8, 2 7, I,22 6, 8 9, 223 6,5, ,423 9, 3, 2 56, 47, 799,244 7, , 527 5, 237 3, 79 3, 578, 77, 37, 872,, 22 35, 78 7,264 64, 68 46, 26,6 32, , 4 46, 78 4, , 7 56, 3 376, 7 2, 4, , 438 2,6 69, , , 4,39! 49, 673 2,39! 5, 9 47,55 58,379 37,996! 37, ,237 i 2, 229,2 244, 254 9,9 j 8,534! 23,7! 2,5! 9,879 i 2,9,445 3,568,398 i 592,29 j 7, 3,59 j 25,22 253, 44,53 8, 373,36 58, , 2,4 387, 3 8,5 244,473 57,858 26, 34 7,8 45,455 43, 8 32, 68 24, 76,26 3,5 5,8 43,797 8,4 85,32 92,53 I 4, ,9 9,9 87,58 9,256 87,222 45,76 34,943 2,773 5,97! 9,22! 25,57! 7, 2, , 256 2,34 3, 77 26, 54 3, 544 5, , 224 4, 2 8,943 29,,5 9, 78 32,72,794 8, 558 7, , 576, , 9 436, 8 92, ,9 73,739 47,44, , 7 55, 6 436, ,27 54,7 56, 43,49 64,3 25,98 73, 63 7,4 9, 34 6, 9 22, 72 9,98H, 54 5,637 i 2,9 4, 23 38, 8,35 44, 35, 727 6, 99 2,4 3, 3,794 35, 294 5, 5 5, 285

19 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 7 More Retail Establishments Than in 929. The census of 3 revealed remarkably little change in the number of retail establishments during the period of severe contraction in sales and prices subsequent to 929. Reports now available for reveal an increase of 8 percent, or almost 23,, in the number of establishments in comparison with the figures reported for 3. The increase would be even larger if some 29,5 established, previously classed as bakeries, garages, heating and plumbing shops, and electrical shops had not been transferred from retail trade to other census classifications. This gain was mainly a result of increases in the following classes: Food stores, beer and liquor stores, filling stations, drinking places, and fuel and ice dealers. Against this can be set the decline in the number of stores engaged in the sale of general merchandise, garages, and eating places. This cannot all be interpreted to mean an actual change in the establishments themselves, but rather in part to a change in classification due to the policy of classifying each concern according to its principal line of business. This policy would account for a large part of the shifts, for example, from garages to filling stations and from eating places to drinking places. However, there can be no doubt but that beer and other liquor establishments, packaged and otherwise, first legalized in 3, contributed a major portion of the increase. In 3, there were 24,2 stores classed as beer and liquor stores, eating and drinking places, as against 263,47 in, a gain approximately half the total gain reported in the number of retail establishments. Geographically, but three States, other than those for which returns are yet incomplete, had a fewer number of retail establishments in than in 3. These States are Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. Number of Active Proprietors Decreased. Despite the 8-percent increase in the number of retail establishments from 3 to, the number of active proprietors declined. According to the census definition, active proprietors include "proprietorowners devoting the major portion of their time to the business. They are not included in the count of employees, nor is their compensation included in the pay-roll totals. Corporate officers and executives of corporations are not proprietors." This group numbered,5,94 in as compared with,5,34 in 3. It is true that last year's figure will be somewhat increased when final reports are available, but the States from which little, if any, additional data are expected show a definite decrease in the number of proprietors. Employment up 4 Percent, Pay Rolls 23 Percent. The increase in sales from 3 to was accompanied by a substantial gain in both employment and pay rolls in retail establishments. The average number of employees, both full-time and part-time, increased 4 percent from 3,433,2 in 3 to 3,9,927 in, while pay rolls increased 23 percent from $2,9,445, in 3 to $3,568,398, in. Although available reports do not separate parttime and full-time employment, the separation of pay rolls into these two groups shows that the 23-percent increase in total pay roll consisted of a 25-percent gain in full-time pay roll and a 5 percent decline in the amount received for part-time service. This indicates that the failure of total employment to increase more nearly in proportion to sales was a result of the more steady employment afforded persons who were previously working short hours. Final tabulations, when published, will indicate the true extent of this development. In any case, whether as a result of fuller employment, of higher wages, or of a combination of the two, the average pay of employees in retail establishments, both full-time and part-time, increased 8 percent from $8 in 3 to $ in. Incomplete as the preliminary reports are, the Census of Business retail trade data indicate an appreciable recovery in sales, number of employees, and pay rolls in all sections of the country. Preliminary data are now available for each State and also for each city of more than 5, population. These provide data relative to the number of stores, amount of sales, number of proprietors and employees, and amount of pay roll for each kind of business. The Bureau of the Census states: "Final reports will follow as rapidly as they are completed. Area tables will show stores, sales, personnel, and pay roll for each city and town of more than 2,5 population and for remainder of each county, and stores and sales by kinds of business (54 classifications in cities of more than 5, and 2 classifications in smaller places and for each county). Other tables will present data in considerable detail on operating expenses, rental rates, employment by months, pay rolls, types of operation (independents, chains, mail order, house-to-house, etc.), credit businesses, distribution of sales by size of business and by city-size groups, and the nature and proportion of the various commodities sold by each kind of store. "Special-subject reports will include tables and pertinent census facts on food retailing, liquor retailing, apparel retailing, the retailing of automobiles, gasoline and oil, furniture and household appliance retailing, drug retailing, and others." Classification of individual stores should be better than in 3 because of more complete information on the schedules. For the same reason it is expected that the Census of Business report on Retail Distribution will be more comprehensive and should give a more accurate picture of the field than did the preceding report.

20 Digitized for FRASER 8 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS ADMITTED ASSETS OF UNITED STATES LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES l [Thousands of dollars] Year and month Total admitted assets Total Mortgage loans Farm Other Total Bonds and stocks held (book value)! Government Public utility Policy loans and,, premium Railroad I Other! notes 923 monthly average 924 monthly average 925 monthly average 926 monthly average 927 monthly average 928 monthly average 929 monthly average monthly average 7, 39, 79 7, 992, 5 8,4,7 9,, 378, 45, 2 2,42, 7 3, 3, 972 4, 63, 263 2, 649, 924 3, 9, 996 3, 554, 768 4,, 9 4,, 337 5, 26, 77 5, 8, 49 6,6,7, 2, 87, 3, 439, 4, 94, 555, 723, 636, 24, 599, 36,594,294,567,226 I,4,7, 6, 557 2,, 6 2, 592, 355 3,,34 3,, 772 4,64,96 4, 549, 26 3, 34, 873 3,42, 3, 634, 6 3, 8, 54 4, ,, 985 5, 9, 696 5, 54, 67, 26, 79,7,444, , 5 6, 537, 9, 3, 278,, 23 2, 7 358, 5,6 677, 6 9, 468, 97, 463, 256, 4,433, 36, 9,, S, 5,9,36 2, 7,57 2, 25, 9 2, , 54, 38 2, 599, 72, 69 87,638! 96, 432 4,644 42, 6f,4 23, 727 3, 8 47, 92, , 558,5,92, 56,54, 34, 8, 44, ,6, March April May June July August -..- Monthly average.. March April May June July August D ecember Monthly average March April May June July August Monthly average March April May June July August Montly average- -_ March April May June July August... _ , 238, 263 5, 38, 6 5, 47, 2S 5, 55, 5, 6, 639 5,7,9 5, 87, 8 5, 99, 79 5, 972,69 6,, 6,23,857 6, 2, 64 5,, 96 6, 294, 5 6, 37, 5 6,46, , 26 6, 4, 452 6, 473, 569 6, 52, 59 6, 547,76 6, 67, 5 6, 4, 336 6, 6, 59 6,,29 6, 54, 225 6, 798, 35 6,, 225 6,, 549 6,852,5 6, 879, 58 6, 8, 6 6, 8, 764 6,9,499 6, 9, 4 7, 42, 642 7, 8, 87 7,46,55 6, 924, 29 7,28, 49 7,, 277 7,,78 7, 245, 7 7, 35,78 7, 3,64 7, 7,9 7, 552, 24 7,, 646 7, 76, 97 7, 87, 352 7, 8, 3 7, 457,39 7,998,2 8, 67, 943 8,22, 426 8, 2,39 8, 296, 97 8, 3, 523 8,5,79 8, 6, 579 8, 7, 22 8,,8 8, 92, 5 9, 8,47 Monthly average 8,468,59 6, 243, 24 6, 254, 57 6, 26, 298 6, 2, 928 6, 276, 572 6, 2, 6, 2, 535 6, 2, 372 6, 29, 733 6, 39, 28 6, 34, 779 6, 39, 8 6, 28, 6, 323, 59 6, 39, 7 6, 39, 554 6, 292,4 6, 27, 6, 244, 525 6, 29, 46 6,94, 9 6,, 679 6,35, 54 6, 94, 696 6,, 98 6, 29, 538 6, 37, 6,4, 39 5,96, 636 5, 929, 327 5, 8,23 5, 6, 5,,67 5, 764, 4 5, 722, 57 5, 6, 5, 8, 8 5, 578,964 5,, 242 5, 542, 7 5, 498, 2 5, 44, 53 5, 3, 969 5, 328, 7 5, 264, 5, 23, 5 5,3, 3 5,72, 22 5, 8, 64 4, 928,6 4, 8,26 5, 22, 253 4,, 59 4,, 694 4, 699, 33 4, 649, 479 4, 6, 2 4, 563, 355 4, 522, 46 4,, 256 4, 445, 43 4, 43,72 4,, 298 4, 376, 736 4,56,547 i I, 55, 499, 55, 25, 542, 78, 539, 563,536,427, 533, 279, 53,, 529,76, 526, 354, 523,7,59,23, 58,7, 532, 49, 57,, 5, 79, 4, 543, 4, 346,472,925, 4, 739, 455, 56, 447,, 438,, 428, 2,4.33,397,55, 458, 352, 3, 5, 377, 638, 363, 733,352,7, 339, 42,37,5, 37,72, 2, 68, 2, 38, 2. 42,244,8, 23, 42, 33, 557, 2, 4,, 559,6, 25,39, 363,2, 38, 97, 2, 73, 232, ,9,37 997, 967, ,,8, , 2, 552 8, 3, 336 8, ,38, 469 8, 256, 38 87, 22, 6, 3 854, 3 4, 692, 525 4,, 267 4, 78, 59 4, 723, 3 4,,45 4, 3, 436 4, 2, 36 4, 9,96 4, 7, 379 4, 7, 9 4, 7, 5 4,8, 8 4, 9, 39 4, ,87,997 4,, 4,, 768 4, 797, 735 4, 78, 7 4, 764, 44 4, 7, 27 4, 727, 9 4, 76, 6?2 4, 6, 3 4, 6, 358 4, 76,S6 4, 647, 3 4,6,67 4, 596, 4, 576, 4, , 59, 36 4, ,468,87, 4, 44,9 4,43,53 4, 3, 55 4, 3, 544 4, 55, 685 4, 33, 854 4, 39, 273 4, 28, 45 4, 247, 4, 28, 277 4,,98 4, 3, 35 4,, 4 4, 52, 2 4,,33 3, 96, 239 3,92,25 4, 4, 7 3,879, 567 3,8,42 3,, 949 3, 769,43 3, ,7,27 3, 68, 992 3, 3, 3, 7, 392 3, 63,87 3, 599, 3, 572, 37 5, 73, 5, 7, 738 5, 85,73 5, 3, 722 5, 5, 692 5,8,8 6, 4, 255 6, 6, 5 6,, 8 6,27,4 6,33, 536 6, 35, 35 5, 9, 58 6, ,47, 336 6,47, 78 6,38, 9 6,42, 98 6,4, 56 6,44,476 6,6, 4 6,72,456 6,. 47 6, 94, 9 6, 2, 92 6,59, 497 6, 28, 3 6, 23, 26 6, 237, 3 6, 246, 3 6,237,943! 6,264,9 ' 6,297,25 6, 358, 529 6, , 4, 2 6,568,7 6, 592,353 6, 34, 55 6, 67, 6, 729, 76 6, 76,969 6, 4, 63 6, 2, 3 6, 973, 544 7,,4 7,6, 687 7, 35, 734 7, 478, 38 7, 5, 7, 79, 7 7, 7, 73 7,, 9 7, 97, 25 8, 5, 436 8,53, 8 8, 277, 4 8, 325, 5 8,478,2 8, 5, 8, 643, 8,, 8, 8, 24 9,9, 3 3,77, I 8,433,2, 2, 53,4, 373,6,8,3, 587,6,,, 38,27,68,25,985, 285, 5, 278, 9,278,, 2,22,98, 63, 285, 44, 298, 3, 297, 4, 299, 579, 38,.32,927, 322, 69, 338, 878, 3, 473, 36, 222, 372, 3, 3,3, 328, 278, 4, 697, 422,92, 442, 97, 46, 677, 46, 3, 49, 24, 57, 27, 5,23, 59, 67, 642, 3, 5, 67, 8,, 547, 77, 3,35, 6, 994, 9, 44 2, , 36, 2 2,5, 459 2,9, 673 2, 225, 3 2, 394, 249 2, 49, 2, 564, 39 2, 79, 3 2, 25, 2,4, 444 2, 942, 2, 996, 443 3, 69, 452 3,46, 3,, 3 3, 245, 9 3, 298, 6 3, 3, 3,494, 728 3, 549, 27 3, 78, 22 3, 244, 977, 53, 94, 557, 8, 563,, 5,87, 5, 9, 8, 44, 646, 34,,397, 647,2, 6, 738,,6,, 5, 63, 425,6,, 6, 64,, 9, 8, 644, 7, 5,3,9, 4, 2, 3, 559, 3, 979,5,725,9,,4,, 5,85, 5, 3, 7, 334, 4, 46,,98,, 29, 3, 378, 6, 243,6,7, 673, 49, 6, 8, 68, 945, 678, 26, 6, 722, 6, 632, 6,3,7,3, 73, 3,7,596, 76,9, 723, 343, 733, 39, 737, 57,, 299, 767, 36, 773, 587, 724,, 787, 94, 794, 728, 8, 433,, 43, 8,, 9, 8, 4, 27, 978,85, 96, 468, 978, 2 2, 26, 27, 996, 2, 632, 52 2, 647, 639 2,, 855 2, 9, 785 2, 2, 536 2, 3, 8 2, 7,9 2, 6, 6 2, 8, 2, 6, 2 2, 6,276 2, 685, 5 2, 6, 97 2, 6, 355 2, 678, 39 2, 6,437 2, 67,459 2, 6, 8 2,, 78 2, 6, 9 2, 4, , 68 2, 649, 347 2, 6, 3 2, 638, 534 2,, 967 2, 637, 2, 636, 5 2, 63, 2, , 67, , 2, , 68, 423 2, 68, 2 2, 68, 23 2,69,6 2, 5, 287 2,69,79 j 2, 5, 5 2, 587, 67 2, 5, 2 2, 5, 4 2, 5, 9 2, 59, 298 2, 64, 96 2, 64, 9 2, 67, 25 2, 4,32 2, 7, 8 2, 6, 49 2, 63, 2 2, 7, 4 2, 632, 2, 634,4 2, 64, 2, 635, 92 2, 634, 59 2, 69, 2 2, 3, 233 2, 9, ,23 2, 67, 679 2, 592, 287, 94, 38 I 2, 6, 55 4, 472,878 4, 27 4, 533 7, , 676 4, ,222 59, , 3 55, 5 55,92 4, 344! 56, , 87 54, 4 2, ,4! 2, , 34 2, 5, 79 52, 23 2, , 572 2,! 549 5, 2, 6, 46 53, S7S, ,6 2, ,3! 2. 9( ,47 2, 9, 7 53,353 2,96,8 54,63 2, 79, 737 2, 28, 3 2, 239, 29 2, 2, 22 2, 296, 855 2, 328, 579 2, 352, 2, 3, 35 2, , , 556, 68 2, ,, , 59! 2, 925, ,6 2, 6, 69 59, 25 i 2. 3,3 58,54 2, 944, i , 85 58, , ,8 2, 96, 5 52, 4 2, 9, 534 5, 58 2,, 96 52,8 2, 8, 45 5, 79 2, 97, 28 5,233 2,922,97 55, 63 59, 58 58,36 53, , , 678 5,27 587,98, 728,, 54 6, 279 2, 96, , 8 2, 3, 685 2, 8, 47 2, 7, 2, 858, 925 2, , , 7,78 2,, 336 2,, 59 2, 9, 3 563, 68 2., 9 5, 672 6, 96 69, 67, , , 8,853 6,6 687,7 i 698,54 I 7,57!,2 7.68! 2, 3, 6 2,,92 2,, 729 2,, 3 2, 796,457 2, 79, 52 2, 7, 8 2, 776, 5 2, 77,67 2, 76,973 2, 9, 443 2,, , i Compiled by The Association of Life Insurance Presidents and supersede data shown in the 2 Annual Supplement, pp. and, in the July 3 issue, p. 8, and in monthly issues until the issue. The above data are compiled from the reports of 37 companies who held percent of the total admitted assets of all United States legal reserve companies at the end of. The data are given as the end of each month and are designed to show the fluctuations in the various kinds of investments held by life-insurance companies. Admitted assets are those used in the determination of a company's statutory surplus. The valuations here given on stocks and bonds are book values. In addition to the items listed above, the total assets also include real estate, collateral loans, bills receivable, interest due and accrued, and deferred and unpaid premiums, etc. Of the amounts represented by bonds and stocks held at the end of, 94.7 percent were bonds, 4.3 percent were preferred and guaranteed stocks, and percent common stocks. For data, see p. 33 of this issue.

21 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS COST OF LIVING IN THE UNITED STATES, BY MAJOR ITEMS [Monthly average, 923 = ] 9 Month COMBINED INDEX March April May June July August Monthlv average J C f C CLOTHING March - April May June July August Monthly average ~58.~8 ~6."6 "7." 5 "." lire FOOD C March April May.- - June July \ugust Monthly average no * FUEL AND LIGHT March- _ April May- June. July August _. Monthly average HOUSING March April May- June July August.. Monthly average "57." ~58.~ ~~73.~ Footnote at end of table.

22 Digitized for FRASER 2 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS COST OF LIVING IN THE UNITED STATES, BY MAJOR ITEMS Continued [Monthly average, 923=] Month SUNDRIES March April. May June July August Q Monthly average Compiled by the National Industrial Conference Board to show the trend of living costs of wage-earner families. Up to March 922 the prices used are as of the st of the month, and subsequently the figures are as of the 5th of each month. An exception is the index of food prices which is the index of the U.S. Department of Labor as of the 5th of the month for the period from 94 through August 3. Since that time the Department of Labor has computed their index on a biweekly basis, and for the purposes of the Conference Board the index nearest the 5th of the month has been used, excepting those months when 2 reporting periods are about equidistant from the 5th when an average of the 2 is used. The index is based on a comprehensive list of retail prices and rents. It is an arithmetic average of weighted relatives, using the 923 average as the base. The weights are based on post-war household expenditures of wage-earner families as determined from studies made in several different cities by various agencies extending over the period For the 5 classifications in the index the weights are: Foods, 33; housing, 2; clothing, 2; fuel and light, 5; and sundries, 3. In the last group, household furnishings and reading materials are given the heaviest weights (4.2 percent each). Church, charity, and gifts, and insurance payments are each given 3.6 percent, and recreation, 3.3 percent. Other items included in the miscellaneous group are tobacco, organization dues, physician's fees, carfare, drugs and toilet articles, and candy. For all of the groups except housing, the individual items contained in each group are weighted according to consumption, as indicated by the composite results of the family budget studies. For housing, the index is based on the average rents of houses and apartments of 4 or 5 rooms, with bath, unheated (except in a few instances where heated apartments are the prevailing type), of the kind occupied by wage earners. The basic data are obtained from renting agencies on rentals paid for newly rented properties and, hence, the rent index reflects the trend of "market" rents. Each group index is computed by the percent change method which, in brief, relates the percent change between 2 consecutive months in an identical list of items to the index for the earlier of the 2 months, thus giving the index for the latest month. A detailed description of this index is presented in The Cost of Living in the United States, 94-36, pp. 3-42, published by the National Industrial Conference Board. PASSENGER AUTOMOBILES AND VISITORS ARRIVING AT NATIONAL PARKS [Number] Passenger automobiles Visitors Year Number Month Year Num- i ber I Month mo. av 92 mo. av 92 mo. av 922 mo. av 923 mo. av._ 924 mo. av 925 mo. av 926 mo. av 927 mo. av_. 928 mo. av 929 mo. av mo. av mo. av 3,79 4,5 5, 7,2, 2,9 5, 792 2, i" 28,36 29,879 32, 55 38, 4, 53 March April May June July August Monthly average.,47 8,778 9,6 2, , , 4 96,4 85, 3 43, 5 5, 799 7,597 5,8 3,968 7,3 7,9 6.29,425 9, 9 5, 273,,. 39 6, 73 28,4 '4.8 8,3 9,98 2, 949 7, 3 28, 98 64, ,573 34, 4,45 2, 27 4,2 2, 68 43,28 9, 5, 8, 642 4,4 4,9, ,6 6, 69 77, 72 8,,94 8,8 29,45 6, 573 8,858 8, 36,6 2,3, , 24, mo. av. 92 mo. av. 92 mo. av. 922 mo. av. 923 mo. av. 924 mo. av. 925 mo. av. 926 mo. av. 927 mo. av. 928 mo. av. 929 mo. av. mo. av mo. av 23,494 29, 43 3, 58 37, 29 5, 55, 7, 6"~,78 9, 555 5, 9 23,524 37,3 39,2 ^. M arch April May June July,_ August Monthly average 37, 26 3, 96 29,45 39,9, 4 2,392 25,5 9, 52 36, , 5 33, 44,36 6,34 36, ,3 33, 57,49 49, ,28 47, 67,767 9, 5 ',494 44,34 9,, 24 23,.3,6 245, 3,39 329, 3 38, , 5, """ " '" 5, 7 2, 496 2,45 3, 343 5,473,473 2, 72 42, 9 49, 7 64, ,56 258,4 46,872 2, 257 6, 55, 28, 32 23, 946 5,5 26, , ,9 77,7 6,9 98, 42 25,994 53,47 Compiled by the U. S. Department of the Interior, ational Park Service, from reports of superintendents of the following parks: Crater Lake (Oreg.); Glacier (Mont.), Grand Canyon (Ariz.), Mesa Verde (Colo.); Mount Rainer (Wash.); Sequoia and Yosemite (Calif.); Yellowstone (Wyo.); Zion (Utah), beginning with 92 when 3,692 visitors and 644 automobiles entered; and Carlsbad Caverns (N. Mex.), beginning with when 9,4 visitors and 28,85 automobiles entered. The Glacier National Park season is from June 5 to 5; hence the totals include data for this park during the 4 months only. Yearly totals prior to 2 are totals for the travel year, Oct. to Sept. 3, inclusive. The above data represent a revision of the figures that were published on p. 22 of the 2 Annual Supplement in the monthly issues until this issue. EMPLOYMENT IN IOWA [Monthly average =] Month Miarch April May,- -- June - - July _ - - August SeDtember Dpopmbpr Monthly average Compiled by the Iowa Bureau of Labor, based upon monthly reports from between 29 to 3 concerns engaged in manufacturing trade, and public-service (not governmental work) industries which represent 5, workers (executives only excluded) in the State. Approximately 8 percent or 4, workers are employed in the manufacturing industries and the remaining 2 percent in trade and public service. Based upon the Federal Census of Manufactures the indexes represent approximately 2 percent of the total manufacturing, trade, and public-service employment in Iowa. A higher percentage of 25 percent is obtained when the manufacturing industries alone are considered. Firms are requested to report the number of persons on their pay rolls as of the 5th of the month or the closest prior pay day. The indexes are constructed by the link-relative method and are based upon reports of identical firms from month to month. They are unweighted and have not been adjusted for seasonal variation or to the trends shown by the Federal Census of Manufactures. The base period for these indexes is the average for the 3 years taken as.

23 SUKVEY OF CUERENT BUSINESS 2 ITEM Business activity: New York Times* Business Week* Commodity prices, wholesale Dept. of Labor, 926=: Combined index (7) Farm products (67) Food (22) Allother (5) Fisher's index, 926=: Combined index (2) Copper, electrolytic} Cotton, Middling, spot Construction contracts} Distribution: Carloadings Employment: Detroit, factory.. Finance: Failures, commercial. Security prices: Bond prices} Stock prices} 78, WEEKLY BUSINESS INDICATORS* i [Weekly average, =] 4 Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Oct. Nov. Nov. Dec. Nov ITEM F inance C ontinued. Banking: Debits, outside N. Y. C.}... Federal Reserve reporting member banks:} Loans, total Interest rates: Call loans} Time loans} Money in circulation : Automobiles Bituminous coal} Cotton, consumption Electric powerf Lumber Petroleum Steel ingots Receipts, primary markets: Cattle and calves Hogs Cotton Wheat Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Oct ! Nov. Nov , Dec. Nov Data do not cover calendar weeks in all cases. *Computed normal =. }Daily average. f Weekly average, 928-3=. WEEKLY BUSINESS STATISTICS* Nov. 28 i Nov. 2 Nov. 4 Nov. 7 Oct. 3 Oct Nov. 3 Nov. 23 Dec. Nov Dec. 2 COMMODITY PRICES, WHOLESALE Copper, electrolytic, New York.. _dol. per lb. Cotton, middling, spot, New York dol. per lb. Food index (Bradstreet's) dol. perlb. Iron and steel, composite dol. per ton- Wheat, No. 2, Hard Winter (K. C.)~--dol. per bu. FINANCE Banking: Debits, New York City mills, of dol. Debits, outside of New York City..mills, of dol.. Federal Reserve banks: Reserve bank credit, total mills, of dol. Bills bought mills, of dol. Bills discounted _ mills, of dol. U. S. Government securities mills, of dol. Member bank reserve balances mills, of dol. Excess reserves, estimated mills, of dol. Federal Reserve reporting member banks: Deposits, net demand, adjusted...mills, of dol. Deposits, time mills, of dol. Investments, total mills, of dol. U. S. Government direct obligations mills, of dol_ Obligations fully guaranteed by U. S. Government._ mills, of dol. Loans, total mills, of dol. On securities...mills, of dol. All other mills, of dol. Interest rates, call loans..percent_ Interest rates, time loans percent _ Exchange rates: French franc (daily av.) cents. Pound sterling (daily av.) dollars- Failures, commercial number- Money in circulation mills, of dol Security markets: Bond sales (N. Y. S. ".)--thous. of dol. par value - Bond prices, 4 corporate issues dollars- Stock sales (N. Y. S. E.) thous. of shares. Stock prices (N. Y. Times) dol. per share- Stock prices (Standard Statistics) (49) =. Industrial (347) 926=. Public utilities (4) 926= Railroads (32) 926= ,5 4, 2, , 43 6,7 2, 2 5, 464 5,34 3, 2 9,78, 247 8,779 3,99 5, , ,433 63, , ,947 5,39 2, ,43 6, 85 2,276 5,399 5,29 3,69 9,234, 26 8,2 3,53 5, , 3, , ,6 3,73 2, ,43 6,5 2,26 5, 379 5,22 3, 724 9,267,258 8,764 3,79 5, ,399 7, , ,9 4,358 2,4 37 2,43 6,6 2,38 5, 26 5,42 3, 72 9,25,253 8,725 3,92 5, ,3 68, , ,2 4,336 2,4 36 2,43 6,732 2,58 5,34 5, 3, 796 9,2,257 8,72 3,79 5, ,329, , , 4, 2, ,43 6, 6 2,27 5, 228 5,72 3,,254 8, 3,92 5, ,322 7, , ,5 4, 2, ,43 5,7 3,5 4,8 4,872 2, 8,3,37 8,52 3,8 5, ,8 67, 97.4, ,787 4,296 2, ,43 5,7 3,69 3, 4,872 2,4 8,333,35 8,2 3,56 4, ,7 94, , , 3,26 2, ,43 4,8,5,499 4,8,87 7,2 8,7 3,24 5, ,5 52, , ,8 3,5 2,47 6 2,43 4,96,92,392 4,3, 4 7, ,6 3,9 5, ,4 64, 59. 5, , 2,7 2, ,432 2, , ,522 5,45 9, 3,7 5, ,73 47, , PRODUCTION, CONSTRUCTION, AND DISTRIBUTION : Automobiles (Cram's estimate) number- Bituminous coal (daily av.)_-thous. of short tons. Electric power mills, of kw.-hr. Petroleum thous. of bbl. Steel ingots (Dow-Jones est.) pet. of capacity. Construction-contract awards (da. av.)..th. of dol Distribution: Freight-car loadings, total..cars. Coal and coke cars_ Forest products cars. Grain and products cars. Li vestock cars. Merchandise,. c. cars. Ore cars. Miscell aneous ears - Receipts: Cattle and calves thousands. Hogs thousand s_ Cotton into sight thous. of bales- Wheat at primary markets thons. of bn. Data do not cover calendar weeks in all cases. Digitized for FRASER 4,2, 2,34 3, 679,9,4 32, 587 3, 9 5,944 45, 538 3, , ,5,6,676 2,96 3,6 7,7 7,5, ,47 36, 4 9, ,73 26,43 325, , 598 4, 2,6 2,7 3,4 7,779 7, , 34, 55 33, , 68, 34, , ,2,73 2,69 2,9 9, 38,498 32, 5 29, 327 9,77 68, 55 38, 79 38, , 59, 985, 3 2,76 3,44 8,6,, 63 36, , 2, 9 7, 59 4, , ,, 2,67 3, 8,78 85,972 64,949 36, ,25 22, 273 7, 49, 7 338, , 358,4,877 2, 57 9,67 57,878 28,53 25,5 3,54 3,28 37,64 8,8 228, , 723,359,3 2, 55 7, ,924 4, 38 28,5 33,37 5,42 6,879,7 257, , 646,269,6 2, ,4 4,85 8,64 8, 8 23, 78 5, , 769 3,579 8, R9 7,676,222, 2, ,963 56, , 3 2,68 27, 9 9,59 59,3 3, 26, ,2,272,554 2, 28,44 499, 596,2 2, , 4 4, 392 4,579 2,9, ,8

24 22 SUEVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly Business Statistics The following summary shows the trend of industrial, commercial, and financial statistics for the past 3 months. Statistics through for all series except those marked with an asterisk (*) will be found in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey of Current Business, together with an explanation of the sources and basis of the figures quoted. Series so marked represent additions since the Annual was issued and similar information, if published, will be found in the places noted at the bottom of each page. Note, however, that many revisions have occurred since the last Annual Supplement was published. A special supplement was included in the April issue, pages 57 to 2 9 inclusive. This supplement gave the monthly averages of all current series for the years 2, 3, and 4. The terms "unadjusted" and "adjusted" used to designate index numbers refer to the adjustment for seasonal variation. Data subsequent to will be found in the Weekly Supplement to the Survey. Monthly statistics through, together with explanatory footnotes and refer- j ences in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey! March April May June July August BUSINESS ACTIVITY (Annalist)! Combined index normal =.. Automobile production normal = -. Boot and shoe production...normal =.. Carload ings, freight normal = -. Cement production normal =.. Cotton consumption normal = _. Electric power production...normal =.. Lead production normal =.. Lumber prod uction norraa.. Pig-iron production normal = - Rayon consumption normal =.. Silk consumption normal = _ Steel-ingot production normal = -. Wool consumption normal =. Zinc prod uction normal. INDUSTUIAL PRODUCTION (F.R.B.) Total, unadjusted = -. Manufactures, unadjusted._ = -.j Automobiles! = --I Cement = -. Food products =..j Glass, plate =--! Iron and steelf =.-j Leather and shoesf = --! Lumber = -! Paper and printing =.- Petroleum refining = --I Rubber tires and tubes =--! Shipbuilding = ' Textiles = Tobacco manufactures =. Minerals unadjusted =.- Anthracite =--! Bituminous coal =.- Iron-ore shipments =-. I Lead =.- Petroleum, crude = - J Silver =-.' Zinc = Total, ad j list ed =.. Manufactures, adjusted.._ = Automobilest =.. Cement =-. Food products = - Glass, plate =-. Iron and steelt =.. Leather and shoest =.- Lumber =- Paper and printing = Petroleum refining =.., Rubber tires and tubes =.. Shipbuilding =- Textiles = Tobficco manufactures = Minerals, adjusted = Anthracite =. _ Bituminous coal _ = Iron-ore shipments = Lead =.. Petroleum, crude. _ = Silver =.. Zinc = «24. 3 " ' no L I oo BUSINESS INDEXES S ! * I I i , SI * * a Revised. v Preliminary. f Revised series, refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues for revisions. The Annalist indexes of business activity have been revised for the period For revisions see p. 2 of the issue. Federal Reserve Board indexes, leather and shoe production, 99-3, 4, p. 9; automobile and steel production for 3, 4, p. 22; leather and shoe production,, p. 22, April. Federal reserve adjusted indexes revise as follows: Total industrial, total manufacturing, plate glass, beginning and automobiles beginning August. Since 4 no seasonal adjustment has been made for tire and tube production. Digitized for FRASER Revisions not shown above will appear in a subsequent issue a 9. 7 a « * <* « SO <*56 a 6» 46 98

25 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 23 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey BUSINESS INDEXES Continued March April M ay June July August MARKETINGS Agricultural products * (quantity) =.. Animal products =-. Dairy products =.. Livestock =.. Poultry and eggs =.. Wool =. Crops =-. Cotton =. Fruits =. Grains =. Vegetables = Agricultural products, cash income received from marketings of:*t Crops and livestock: Unadjusted =.. Adjusted.. _ =.. Crops, adjusted =.. Livestock and products, adjusted =.. Dairy products, adjusted =- Meat animals, adjusted =.. Poultry and eggs, adjusted =. STOCKS Domestic stocks Manufactured goods =.. Chemicals and allied prod =.. Food products =.. Forest products = Iron and steel products =.. Leather =.. Metals, nonferrous =_. Paper, newsprint =.. Rubber products =.. Stone, clay, and glass =.. Textiles..* =.. Raw materials =.. Chemicals and allied prod_923-25=_. Foodstuffs =.. Metals =.. Textile materials =.. World stocks foodstuffs and raw materials: TotaltA =... Coffee adj. for seasonal., =.. Cotton adj. for seasonal =.. Rubber adj. for seasonalf =.. Silk adj. for seasonalt =.. Sugar adj. for seasonalf.._ Tea adj. for seasonal =.. Tin unadjusted =.. Wheat adj. for seasonal = i I ; 228 j 33 I 64 i i I 399! ! fi 4 : 9! 54 5 I \ 4 44! j 225 I I 5 I 32 j 2 22 I 8 ; I 67! ^ «« " «2() a COST OF LIVING (N. I. C. B.) f Total, all groups.923=.. Clothing 923 =... Food 923=-. Fuel and light 923=- Housing...923=-- Sundries 923=-- FARM PRICES (Dept. of Agri.) t Total, all groups 99-4=- Chickens and eggs 99-4=.. Cotton and cottonseed 99-4=.. Dairy products 99-4= Fruits. 99-4=-. Grains 99-4 = Meat animals 99-4= Truck crops 99-4=.. Miscellaneous 99-4=.- RETAIL PRICES Department of Labor indexes: Coal* =.. Food f =.. Fairchild's index:* Combined index Dec. =.. Apparel: Infants' wear Dec. =.. Men's.Dec. =.. Women's Dec. =.. Home furnishings Dec. =-. Piece goods Dec. =.. Revised si's" ! COMMODITY PRICES New series. See pp. 6-9 of the May 4 issue, cash income from marketings of agricultural products, p. 9 of the 2 issue, Fairchild's price index, and pp. 9 and 2 of the March 3 issue, quantity marketings. Data for Nov. 5,: Total 2, chickens and eggs 4, cotton and cottonseed 3, dairy products 26, fruits 97, grains 27, meat animals 8, truck crops 4, miscellaneous 33. t Index of farm prices has been completely revised. For earlier data see p. 2 of the 4 issue. World stocks re rised total, rubber adjusted and sugar adjusted indexes for 927-June 2, appeared on p. 2 of the 2 issue. Cash income from marketings of agricultural products revised from 3- June. For revisions see p. 9 of the issue. World stocks combined index and silk index revised for period revisions not shown above will appear in a subsequent issue. Combined index revision for 92 was shown on p. 2 of the May issue. Data revised for Agricultural products, cash income received for 4-July. Revisions not shown in the issue will appear in a subsequent issue. Cost of living revised for period 94-36, see p. 9 of this issue. Monthly y retail prices p of coal were discontinued with the month of August. Subsequent to that date the price is reported quarterly. ^is ^This series has been completely revised. Revised indexes for months not shown in the issue will appear in i subsequent bt issue. Index computed every 2 weeks; monthly index is figure taken nearest the middle of the month; prior to Aug. 5,3, index computed once a month. A See footnote on p. 24 marked, "c?"

26 24 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Januuy COMMODITY PRICES Continued March April May June July August Digitized for FRASER WHOLESALE PRICES Department of Labor index: Combined index (7) 926=.. Economic classes: Finished products 926= Raw materials 926=.. Semimanufactures 926=.. Farm products..926=. Grains =.. Livestock and poultry 926=.. Foods 926=.. Dairy products 926=.. Fruits and vegetables 926=.. Meats 926 =.. Otber products 926=.. Building materials. 926= Brick and tile 926=.. Cement 926= Lumber. 926=. Chemicals and drugs 926=.. Chemicals _...926=.. Drugs and Pharmaceuticals 926=.. Fertilizer materials 926=. Fuel and lighting 926 = Electricity =. Gas 926= Petroleum products 926=.. Hides and leather 926=.. Boots and shoes 926= Hides and skins. 926= Leather 926=.. House-furnishing goods 926=.. Furniture 926= Furnishings. 926=. Metals and metal products. 926=.. Iron and steel 926= Metals, nonferrous 926=.. Plumbing and heating equipment 926=-. Textile products 926=. Clothing 926= Cotton goods 926= Knit goods 926=.. Silk and rayon._ Woolens and worsted 926=.. Miscellaneous 926=.. Auto tires and tubes 926=.. Paper and pulp 926=.. Other wholesale price indexes: Bradstreet's (96)..926= Dun's (3) 926=.. World prices foodstuffs and raw materials:* 8 Combined index =. Coffee =.- Cotton =.. Rubber =.. Silk = Sugar =.. Tea = Tin =.. Wheat = Wholesale prices, actual. (See under respective commodities.) PURCHASING POWER OF THE DOLLAR * Wholesale prices Retail food prices ^ = =.. Farm pricest =.. Cost of livingf =.. CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED Contracts awarded, F. R. B.:% Total, unadjusted =.. Residential =.. Total, adjusted =.. Residential =.. F. W. Dodge Corporation (37 States):A Total, all types: Projects... Valuation thous. of dol. Nonresidential buildings :f Projects _.. Floor space _ thous. of sq. ft ! ] i 8.6.2! I CONSTRUCTION AND REAL ESTATE , 9 225, 3,39 4, 36 79, ,385 2, 596 3,38, 59, ,256 8,249,5! 264,37 2,3 : 2,796,68 : 2, 68 24, ,724 24, 7 Valuation thous. of dol Revised. New series. For earlier data on the following subjects refer to indicated pages of the monthly issues as follows: World prices, p. 2, 2; Purchasing Power of the Dollar (except for farm prices), p. 8, August 3. t Revised series. For revisions of construction contracts awarded on nonresidential buildings for years,, and 2, refer to p. 2 of the 3 issue Farm prices (purchasing power) are on p. 2 of the April issue. Cost of living (purchasing power) revised for Revisions not shown in the issue will appear in a subsequent issue. A A continuation of the statistics shown on pp. 3 and 32, of the 2 annual supplement, by classes, for the years 2 and 3 was published on p. 9 of the August 4 issue ana for 4 on p. 9 of the issue. Series also revised for. See p. 9 of the May issue t Indexes are based on 3-month moving average of F. W. Dodge data centered at second month. See footnote on p. 23 marked "". df Index revised to exclude copper prices, since data on copper stocks have not been available subsequent to. Both stoek and price series now cover 8 commodities as listed. For revised data for period see p. 9 of the May issue. 2,76 6, 47 9, 44 I ,442 42,5 2,355,3, , 54 98,978 3,6 5,98 8, , , 632 3,792 7,343 94, SO !. 5! 78 i , , , 7 3,436 5, 9, j , , 55 3,4 5,96 79, , 294, 735 3,6 7, , ,92 2, 28 3, 54 5, 54 8, a « "59»47 2,56 234,272 3,79 3,639 69, 99

27 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 25 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April May June July August CONSTRUCTION AND REAL. ESTATE Continued CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED Continued F. W. Dodge Corporation (37 States) Con. Public utilities:* Projects number- Valuation thous. of dol_. Public works :# Projects number- Valuation.-.- thous. of dol. Residential buildings: <? Projects Floor space - thous. of sq. ft.. Valuation thous- of dol. Engineering construction : Total contracts awarded (E. N. R.) thous. of dol. HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION Concrete-pavement contract awards: Total thous. of sq. yd.. Roads only thous. of sq. yd- Highways: Approved for construction (iv. /. R. A.):* Mileage number of miles.. Public works funds alloted.thous. of dol. Under construction (N. I. R. A.):* Estimated total cost thous. of dol. Public works funds allotted thous. of dol- Federal aid funds allotted.thous. of dol. Mileage number of miles.. CONSTRUCTION COSTS Building costs all types {American Appraisal Co.)* =.. Building costs all types (A.. C.) -.. Building costs all types (E. N. R.) -.. Building costs factory (Aberthaw) MISCELLANEOUS DATA Fire losses, United States thous. of dol. Foreclosures** Real estate: Home loan bank, loans outstanding* t thous. of dol.. Home Owners' Loan Corp:* A pplications received Loans closed: Number Amount.. thous. of dol. Loans outstanding*._ thous. of dol 24 4, 7,43 52, 8,29 2, , , 42 6, 4,4 52 4, 22, 7 2, ,5 2,439 34, ,98,64,7 6,23 6,764 55,,63 6, 5,8 2, 2,246 92,5,328 3, ,7 4,398, 5 6,259 49,3 2,8, 27,694,54 69,645 4,6 2,253 39,6 54,973 4,496 3, ,,776 8,8, 2, ,872 2,6 97, 5,634 47,927 2,6, ,4,328 76, 387 3,856,9 45,4 235,56 3, ,92,7 68,9 9 2, ,969 3, 22 2,7 9,2 58,54 2,94, ,926, 58,9 3,694,36 37,44 2,547 2,25, ,279,39 6,877 7, ,73 2,56 2,5 4,92 44,49 2,9,438 36, ,325 3,249 9,5 3,76 64, 499 2,68, ,67 6,5,3 6, ,9,794 2,7 9,392 29,9 3,4, ,6,23 44,9 6,8 5, ,697 2,6, ,3 59,5 55,85 569, ,77 3,245 3, ,4, ,3,92 49, 8,233 9,736 67,5,458 3,5 2, ,3 56,4 52,5 467, ,787 3,26 5,969 6,35 9, 3,6, , 773,2 5, 792 8,528 2, 547 7, 253 4, 257 5,235 3, 252 5,9 5,97 45,6 2, ,479,922 6,73 2,8 3,, ,264,33 7,7 8,444 2, 4 73,,97 4, 2,942 4,63 42, 5 38,9, ,47 8, ,52,7 99,3 8,253 2, 5 7, , 5 7, 6, ,345 37, 33, , ,94 9, 5,238 76, 435 7,9 24, 3, , 37 5, 4,6 46 4,2 28, 3 26, , 25, , 735,69 68,767 7,5 2,8 8, 67 97,372 7,63 5, ,44 25,26 22, , 44 29, 2 DOMESTIC TRADE ADVERTISING Printer's Ink indexes (adjusted for seasonal variation) :* Combined index =.. Farm papers =-. Magazines =... Newspapers =. _ Outdoor =.. Radio =.. Radio broadcasting:a Cost of facilities, total thous. of dol._ Automotive thous. of dol. Drugs and toilet goods thous. of dol. Foods thous. of dol Petroleum products thous. of dol_. Tobacco manufactures thous. of dol.. All other* thous. of dol. Magazine advertising:! Cost, total thous. of dol._ Automotive thous. of dol Drugs and toilet goods thous. of dol._ Foods thous. of dol.. Petroleum products thous. of dol. Tobacco manufactures thous. of dol. All other* thous. of dol. Lineage, totalf.-- thous. of lines ,7 72,2, ,2 6,7, ,97 2, ,377 4,2, ,7,6 2,23, ,52 2, ,78 7,46, ,36 979,69,63 5 4,467 2,334 * New series. For earlier data on building costs, American Appraisal Co., refer to p. 2 of the August 3 issue. N. I. R. A highway work started in 3, see 4 issue for beginning of series. For Home Loan Bank loans outstanding for period 2- see p. 9 of the April issue. Home Owners' Loan Corporation data from 3 to April 4 will be shown in a subsequent issue. Total loans closed to June 2,, $3,92,87,7. Printers' Ink indexes from 922 to May 4 appear on p. 9 of July issue. Data prior to May 4 on "all other" radio and magazine advertising not published. See special note below on foreclosures. Data on H. O. L. C. loans outstanding for period 3- are shown on p. 9 of the April issue. t Revised series See p. 2 of the 3 issue, magazine lineage. For revised data on magazine advertising cost for the years 3 and 4, see p. 9 of the issue. Index as of,, Compiled by the Federal Home Loan Bank Board and represent the number of foreclosures on all types of properties in,3 identical communities in States; having 53 percent of the population of the United States. Data prior to 3 not published. Comparable annual totals for 926,,857; 2, 2,; and 3 29,3. Data were not compiled for other years. Months subsequent to 4 were computed by means of a link relative to keep series comparable since the figures for these months are from a slightly different number of communities. # These series represent a break-down of the combined total shown in the Survey previous to 3. For earlier data see p. 2 of the 3 issue. Months of ;, April, July, and, include 5 weeks; other months include 4 weeks. X For the period 3-, inter-bank loans that were formerly included have been removed. A Data for revised. See p. 25 of the May issue, c? Beginning 4 data includes Home Owners' Loan Corporation improvements. Digitized for FRASER ,5 432,3, ,435,57,24, ,79, ,3 4,428, ,,5 2,323, ,6 2, ,2 539,555, ,69 3, 43 2,44 2,477 2, ,2 2, ,6 453,45, , 56 2,46 2,56, ,3 2, ,3 45,227, ,929 2,332 2,359, ,49 2, ,6 394,58, , 268,8 2,37, ,7 2, , , ,97,96,767, ,63, , , ,4,22,6, ,44,

28 Digitized for FRASER 26 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Deceiu ber March April May June July August ADVERTISING Continued Newspaper advertising: Lineage, total (52 cities)* thous. of lines._ Classified-.- thous. of lines.. Display thous. of lines,. Automotive _ thous. of lines.. Financial thous. of lines.. General thous. of lines.. Retail thous. of lines.. GOODS IN WAREHOUSES Space occupied, public merchandise in warehouses percent of total.. NEW INCORPORATIONS Business incorporations (4 States)..number._ POSTAL BUSINESS Air mail, pound-mile performance* thous. of lb. Money orders: Domestic, issued (5 cities): Number. thousands. Value thous. of dol._ Domestic, paid (5 cities): Number thousands.. Value thous. of dol Foreign, issued value thous. of dol Receipts, postal i 5 selected cities thous. of dol.. 5 industrial cities thous. of dol.. RETAIL TRADE Automobiles:* New passenger car sales: Unadjusted.929-3=. Adjusted =. Chain-store sales: Chain Store Age index:*fc? Combined index t av. same month 929-3=.. Apparel index t av. same month 929-3=.. Groceryf av. same month 929-3=.. Five-and-ten (variety) stores:* Unadjusted =. Adjusted =.. H. L. Green Co., Inc.:* Sales thous. of dol._ Stores operated number._ S. S. Kresge Co.: Sales _thous. of dol._ Stores operated 8. H. Kress & Co.: Sales thous. of dol_. Stores operated McCrory Stores Corp.: A Sales thous. of dol.. Stores operated number.. G. C. Murphy Co.: Sales.thous. of dol. Stores operated F. W. Woolworth Co.: Sales.thous. of dol.. Stores operated Restaurant chains (3 companies): Sales.thous. of dol.. Stores operated number Other chains: W. T. Grant & Co.: Sales thous. of dol.. Stores operated. J. C. Penney Co.: Sales thous. of dol.. Stores operated Department stores: Collections:* Installment account percent of accounts receivable. Open account percent of accounts receivable. 36, , 9 2,2 6,, 27,4 77,98 2,56 4,7 4, 4,92 9,437 32, 3, , , , ,5 94 3, ,733,994 9, , 2,494 DOMESTIC TRADE Continued 7, 427 2, 8 96, 769 5,,9 2,7 68, 297 6,9 2,272 87,46 3, 37, 327 3,63 8, 2,38 29, 354 3, ,476 34,925 6, , 23 2,8 23, 3,978 3, , ,23, 7.4 7, 9, 3 97, 2 7,677 2,96 2, 98 67,98.3 2,53 77,264 3, 35, 2, 56 99, 43 2,733 27, 58 2, I ,6 34 2, , , ,97 23, 47,978 3,3 35 8, , 992, ,6 2,7 98,53 4,58,5 6, ,35.2 2,49, 4,346 39,63 4,34 7, 7 5,28 35,985 4, , , , , ,5 39, 59,98 3, , 47 3, 332, , 8 8, ,3 3,787 2,536 7, 6 52, 3.4 2,5 76,3 3,2 37,528 2, , 2 2, , 434 3, , , , , ,3 6, 9,977 3, , 47 3, 964, 6.7 9, 334 7, , 7 3,632,942 9, 464, 6.7 2, 28 5,5 3,3 36, 6, , 855 2,254 26,3 3, ,8 3 9, 57 5, ,69 2 2,3 9 9,6,979 3, , ,692, 7. 6,443 2,99 94,452 5,453 2,773 22,9 63, 327 2, 56 92, 9 4,23 38, 676 3,29 99, 739 3, , ,43 3, , ,8 2 2,32 9 9,677,98 3, , , 2, 7.6 2,7 22, 5 99, 339 7, 2,4 2, 67, , 297 5, 2 3, 37, 4 3,22 99,5 2,45 28,944 3, , , 737 6, ,2 2 3, 9 23, 72,9 3,4 3 7, , 9, , 24,72 3, 8, 4,3 23,498 69, 6.2 2, , 9 3,4 36,45 2, , 32 2, 27, 8 3, J ,54 3, , , , 9 22, 2,9 3, , , 64, , , 8 4,9 4, 994 3,53 2, 47 2,385 28,2 3, ,5 3 2, 725 7, , , ^9 3, , , 4, 4 8. i I 47.6 I 98, ,2 6,5 2,29 8, 287 5,67 2,,55,5,5,5 3,764 38,354 2, 598 3,85 2,4 26, 673 3, ,42 3, , ,2 2,9 9 22,,99 3, , 473 8,4,4 6.2 j 99, 22, , 4,98, 646 6, 53, 6.3,9 3,633 36,5 4,387 22, 52 9,8 4,257,64 2,53 64, , ,4 3, 6 37, 237, , 696 2, 772 3, 2, j 2,72 26, 37 29, 294 3, 22 3, i ' Revised. New series. For description of Chain Store Age indexes see p. 9 of the 2 issue. Data of H. L. Green Co., Inc., prior to July 3 will be shown in a subsequent issue. For earlier data on automobiles see p. 9 of the April 4 issue and variety-store sales, p. 8 of the March 4 issue. Data prior to 3 on collections not published. Data are currently being received from about 4 stores on open accounts and about 25 on installment accounts. Series on air mail not available prior to May 4. Series on basis of weight carried was published in the Survey for the period 926 to 3. T Revised series. For revisions refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues as follows: Apparel sales index of Chain Store Age, p. 26, 3. Combined index and grocery index of Chain Store Age were revised for period 2 through August 4. See footnote on p. 26 of the 4 issue. H Monthly data from 2 through June are e on page 2 of f the July Jl issue. i The New York Evening Post series on newspaper advertising in 22 cities is available for the period 96 through 4. See the 2 annual supplement and monthly issues prior to 4. Data for revised. See p. 26 of the May issue. d Chain Store Age combined index fo? the period 2-35 included 8 companies. Beginning it was increased to 2 caused by the addition of apparel and shoe company ' i I I 9 9! i 2!.5! 97.7 i 2,43 i 32 j, , , 2, ,,99 3, , , 369,4 6.2 " ,5 32, , ,96 2, , 434,9 3, , , 529,

29 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 27 Monthly statistics through 98, to the sources cf the data, may be found in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey ary March April May June July August DOMESTIC TRADE Continued RETAIL TEADE Continued Department stores Continued. Sales, total value, unadjusted A =.. 99 Atlanta* _ =.. 9 Boston =.. 92 Chicago*! =.. 4 Cleveland* =.. 98 Dallas* =,. 2 Kansas City 925=. 2 Minneapolis* 929=.. 2 New York* =.. 97 Philadelphia* =.. Richmond =.. 36 St. Louis =.. San Francisco*t =.. 98 Sales, total value, adjusted* =.. 9 Atlanta* =.. Chicago*! =.. Cleveland* =.. 92 Dallas* =.. 4 Minneapolis* 929=.. 94 New York* =.. 85 Philadelphia* =.. San Francisco*! =.. Installment sales, New England dept. stores, ratio to total sales percent... 9 Stocks, value, end of month: Unadjusted =.. 76 Adjusted = - (59 Mail-order and store sales: Total sales, 2 companies,,.thous. of dol Montgomery Ward & Co. thous. of dol.. 45,455 Sears, Roebuck & Co..-thous. of dol. 58,35 Rural sales of general merchandise:* Unadjusted = Adjusted = j 72 79,945 35,7 44, , , , 39, 4 5, , 58 27, ,435 7, , 58.2 i.! I I 3! 9! 78 9 I 73 i 9.7! 67 I I 6,926 I 24, 5 36, , 43 3, 43 39, no ' ,29 3, 2 44, , 6 3, 33 46, 359 ion , 27 25, , $?) , , , a a 7! " , 9 33, , EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS AND WAGES EMPLOYMENT Factory, unadj. (B. L. S.)* =. Durable goods group* =. Iron and steel and products =. Blast furnaces and steel works =- Structural and metal work =. Tin cans, etc =. Lumber and products =. Furniture =..... Millwork Sawmills Turpentine and rosin Machinery Agricultural implements Electrical machinery, etc Foundry and machine-shop products Radios and phonographs Metals, nonferrous Aluminum manufactures! Brass, bronze, copper products Stamped and enameled ware Railroad repair shops Electric railroad Steam railroad Stone, clay, and glass products Brick, tile, and terracotta Cement ; Glass ; Transportation equipment Automobiles ; Cars, electric and steam = Shipbuilding = Nondurable goods group* = Chemicals and products = Chemicals = Druggists' prep = Paints and varnishes =.. =.... =. =. = _ = aoo. - aoo. = Revised. New series. For earlier data on department store sales by Federal Reserve districts, see p. 2 of the issue excepting Chicago, for which see note below. Wote that the combined index of department-store sales is computed by the Federal Reserve Board and the district indexes are computed by the Federal Reserve banks. For districts not marked with an asterisk the series are as published in the 2 Annual Supplement and subsequent issues. See p. 2 of the 4 issue for rural sales for period 929 to 4. For earlier data on factory employment unadjusted in detail, see p. 6 of the June 4 issue. See p. 9 of the July 4 issue for factory employment unadjusted total. Data on employment in the durable and nondurable goods groups for the period 923-June were shown on p. 9 of the August issue.!revised series. See p. 9 of the April issue, department-store sales, Chicago. Data for department store sales, San Francisco district revised for the period Revisions not shown in the issue will appear in a subsequent issue. AThis series was shown on p. 2 of the June issue from 99 through April. For a subsequent revision see p. 9 of the issue. The adjusted index of department-store sales (total value) was revised by the Federal Reserve Board for the years 929 through 4. Revised indexes for this period were shown on p. 2 of the June issue. For a subsequent revision see p. 9 of the issue. Data have been revised for the period 3-. Revisions not shown in the issue appeared on p. 6 of thp issue. A subsequent revision of the data has been made occasioned by the indexes being adjusted to the 3 census of manufactures. These revisions w'll appear in the Supplement. Digitized for FRASER S ? , ') S ! P. 6 « a. 5 «79.9 «3.6 a (. 9 «85. 9 a " «26.7 «96. 8 «94. 3 «6. 2 «6. 4. «6.. 2»42. 9 «. «97. 4 "87. «. «. 3 a. a. «7.4 «9.6 «99.» 3.3

30 Digitized for FRASER 28 SUEVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Marcb April May June July August i EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS AND WAGES Continued EMPLOYMENT Continued Factory unadjusted Continued. Nondurable goods group -Continued. j Chemicals and products Continued. Petroleum refining =.- Rayon and products =- Food and products =- Baking =- Beverages =-. Slaughtering, meat packing =-- Leather and products Boots and shoes Leather =..- Paper and printing =- Paper and pulp =-. Rubber products =.. Rubber tires and tubes = -- Textiles and products =-. Fabrics =- Wearing apparel Tobacco manufactures =.. Factory adjusted (F. R. B.)* = Chemicals and products = Chemicals = Druggists'preparations =- Paints and varnishes =.. Petroleum refining =- Rayon and products =- Food and products =.. Baking =-- Slaughtering, meat packing =- Iron and steel and products =- Blast furnaces and steel works =- Structural and metal work =.. Tin cans, etc =.. Leather and products =.. Boots and shoes =- Leather =- Lumber and products =- Furniture =. Millwork =- Sawmills =- Machinery =- Agricultural implements =.. Electrical machinery, etc =- Foundry and machine-shop products =. Radios and phonographs =.. Metals, nonferrous _923-25=. Brass, bronze, copper prod_923-25=. Stamped and enameled ware =. Paper and printing =.. Paper and pulp =. Railroad repair shops =.. Electric railroads =.. Steam railroads =.. Rubber products = Rubber tires and tubes =.. Stone, clay, and glass products =.. Brick, tile, and terra cotta_ = Cement = Glass = Textiles and products =.. Fabrics = Wearing apparel =.. Tobacco manufactures._ =.. Transportation equipment = _. ] Automobiles =.. Cars, electric and steam.._ =.. Shipbuilding Factory, by cities and States: Cities: Baltimore* =.. Chicago* =.. Cleveland* =.. Detroit =.. Milwaukee* _ =.. i New York =.. Philadelphia! =.. Pittsburgh*! =.. States: Delaware! =.. Illinois =.. Iowa* =.. Massachusetts*! = ! J ^ I ^ on c OV « ' « "98. ' 2..9 «9. 2 *8. 4 " «99. ".8 * * For earlier data see the following references: For factory employment, adjusted, all series, see pp. 6 to 9 of the July 4 issue; employment in Baltimore, Milwaukee and Massachusetts, p. 8, 2; employment in Chicago, p. 2 ; June 3; Pittsburgh employment, p. 8, 4; Cleveland employment, p. 9, July 4. For Iowa employment see p. 2 of this issue., nnn...,,,....,,,! For revised data refer to the indicated pages as follows: Employment in Delaware and Philadelphia, p. 9, 3; for revisions of years -34 for those series and for the city of Pittsburgh, see p. 2 of the March issue: for Massachusetts, employment for, p. 9, August 3, and for 2-34, p. 2,, revisions for period 3-May not shown in the issue will appear in the supplement.. These data for the period 3- have been revised: revisions not shown in the issue appeared on p. 6 of the issue. A subsequent revision of the data has been made occasioned by the indexes being adjusted to the 3 census of manufactures. The seasonally adjusted indexes will be in the 7 issue.

31 SURVEY OF CURKENT BUSINESS 29 Monthly statistics through,, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey EMPLOYMENT Continued Factory, by cities and States Continued. States Continued. Maryland* 929-3=- New Jersey! = New York = Ohio. _.926=.. Pennsylvaniat = Wisconsin = Nonmanufacturing (B. L. S.): Mining: Anthracite 929= Bituminous coal 929= Metalliferous 929= Petroleum, crude production.929= Quarrying and nonmetallic..929=.. PnHli/» lihlitiae* x udiic utilities. Electric light and power, and manufactured gas = Electric railroads 929= Telephone and telegraph 929=- Trade: Retail t 929= Wholesale!.929=.. IVLISCOlJclIltHJUb. Dyeing and cleaning*!* 929=.. Hotelsf 929=- Laundries*!*. 929= Miscellaneous data: Construction employment, Ohio 926=.. Farm employees, average per farm* number- Federal and State highway employment, total* Construction* number Maintenance* number Federal civilian employees: United States*. number Washington number Railway employees, class I*, thousands Trades-union members employed: All trades _ percent of total Building trades* percent of total.. Metal trades* percent of total._ Printing trades* percent of total.. All other trades* percent of total.. On full time, all trades.percent of total LABOR CONDITIONS Hours of work per week in factories:*!^ Actual, average per wage earner hours.. fndustrial month:f Number of disputes Man-days lost disputes in progress during Workers involved Employment Service (United States):* Applications: In active file! New Placements: Number! Per active applicant.. _ March April May June July August EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS AND WAGES Continued ,7,, 5,98 number 35, 33, 2 number number Labor turn-over:f Accessions percent of no. on pay roll.. ftttt\svrsi t infi G Discharged percent of no. on pay roll Laid off percent of no. on pay roll Voluntary quits percent of no. on pay roll.. PAY BOLLS Factory unadj. (B. L. S.) *.._^923-25= - Durable goods group* =.. Iron and steel and products =.. Blast furnaces and steel works =. _ Structural and metal work =.. Tin cans, etc =.. Lumber and products =. _ Furniture =.. Millwork = Sawmills * Turpentine and rosin =. _ ) ). 3,9 24, , , 59 4, 5 " ,7, 9 357,77 398, ( a ) ,3 76,5 47,324,453,9, ,796, 6, 56, ,523 5,385 39,38 5,236,5, ,3,852, 732 8,456,78 55,457 6, , 229 3, 539 2,69 85, 943, ,9 6, 7 9,25,963 5,94 799, ) ).7 22,4 97, 5, 7,, «249 «632,8 58,69 9,,77 433, , ) ). 2,45 8,6 9, 777 5,87 2,34, Septem ber "249 a 32 "35 a 324 a 28 a 2 " 36 v 342 «8, 3 ",33, " 696, 687",9,552,37,98 ",,4 «85, v,3, a, 79 22, 2 a,5 a 22, 2 a a 2, 8 a ^678 P 35 ( 9,252,7 355, , ) ). 227,5 94,2 33, 3,97 2,37, ,32,57 364, 8 442, ) ).9 287,478 44,73 43,35 6,279 5,73, ,44,859 3 \J\J\Jy 9JX\J , ) ). 3,9 29,5 64, ,439 6,857, ,,299 2Q5 468, ) ). 423,4 258, ,6 7,3 l' ,498, ,4! ) ,97 27, 5 64, 6 8, 4 6, 22, ,726,328 QQf, K«7 437, ) « C). 433, 533 2, 58, 2 9,799 5, 569, , 3,94 "6,9, , , ) " ).7 44,47 2,3 5, , ' a 434, 37.' «73.3 a 8. a.8 7. a ] a 7, Q a.' 5 a ! 2 Revised.» Preliminary. l Temporarily discontinued by the reporting source. * Data not available. * For earlier data see the following references: Employment in Maryland, and Federal civilian employment, total, United States, p. 8, 2: Federal and State highway employment, dyeing and cleaning establishments, and laundries, p. 9, June 3; trades-union members employed, p. 8, 2, and hours of work, p. 2, 2. Pay rolls in the durable group for the period 923-June are shown on p. 9 of the August issue. Data for factory pay rolls by classes are shown on p. 8 of the June 4 issue. See also p. 9. July 4 issue. Data on the U. S. Employment Service for the period July 3-June were shown on p. 9 of the issue. Data for class I railway employment for period July 92-August are shown on p. 2 of the issue.!for revised data refer to the indicated pages as follows: Employment in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, p. 9, 3; for revisions of years -34, see p. 2 of new applications, 878,7, and placements 34,499. Figures represent the condition as of the end of the month shown. This method has been followed since 2. Figures showa previous to that date in the Survey are as of the first of the month. They were published as of the first of the following month by the Department of Agriculture. Data have been revised for the period 3-. Revisions not shown in the issue appeared on p. 6 of the issue. A subsequent revision of the data has been made occasioned by the indexes being adjusted to the 3 Census of Manufactures. These revisions will appear in the Supplement. A The revised series on dyeing and cleaning and laundry employment shown in the August issue have been dropped by the B. L. S. nn3 the publication of the original series resumed in the issue Digitized for FRASER <g)changes in procedures affecting the composition of the active file resulted in the decline during June. IData revised for the period 924 to date. For revisions see p. 7 of the issue.

32 Digitized for FRASER 3 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through,, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey PAY ROLLS Continued Factory unadjusted Continued. Durable goods group Continued. Machinery =.. Agricultural implements =. Electrical machinery, etc =.. Foundry and machine shop products "Radios and phonographs = Metals, nonferrous = -. Aluminum manufactures Brass, bronze, copper products Stamped and enameled ware =. Railroad repair shops =. Electric railroads =. Steam railroads =- Stone, clay, and glass products Brick, tile, and terra cotta Cement =^ Olass =-. Transportation equipment =.. Automobiles =.. Cars electric and steam =.. Shipbuilding =.. Nondurable goods group* = Chemicals and products =.. Chemicals = Druggists' Preparations =. Paints and varnishes =. Petroleum refining =.. Ravon and products =.. Foodand products =.. 3 March April May June July August EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS AND WAGES Continued L Baking \MZO- ^O i uu. Beverages" =. Slaughtering, meat packing = "78.2 Leather and products = «7.2 Boots and shoes = ".6 Leather = ".2 Paper and printing = ".9 Paper and pulp = "85.4 Rubber products! = "78.3 Rubber tires and tubes = ".4 Textiles and products = "8.6 Fabrics = " Wearing apparel = Tobacco manufactures =. Factory by cities: Baltimore* = Chicago* = Milwaukee* = New York* = ". Philadelphia*! = Pittsburgh*! =. Factory by States: ".9 "9.5 Delaware! IllinoisA Maryland* Massachusetts*! = New Jersey! =. New York = Pennsylvania! = "8.5.4 Wisconsin = Nonmanufacturing (B. L. S.): M Ant n 55.9 Bituminous hracite - coal = =. _ Metalliferous..929 = Petroleum, crude production 929 = Quarrying and nonmetallic. 929 = fi Public utilities: Electric light and power and manu factured gas.929=...4»3.4 R Electric railroads 929 = Telephone and telegraph = Trade Retail! 929 = Wholesale!.929= Miscellaneous: Dyeing and cleaning*!* 929= Hotels! 929= Laundries*!* 929= Revised. *For earlier data on the following subjects, refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues as follows: Pay rolls, Baltimore, p. 8, 2; pay rolls, Chicago, p. 2, June 3; pay rolls, Milwaukee, p. 8, 2; pay rolls, New York, p. 29, June 3; pay rolls, Philadelphia, p. 8, 2; pay rolls, Pittsburgh, p. 8, 4; pay rolls, Maryland and Massachusetts, p. 8. 2; pay rolls in dyeing and cleaning establishments and laundries, p. 9, June 3. Data on pay rolls for nondurable goods industries tor the period 923-June are shown on p. 9 of the August issue.! Revised series. For revisions on the following subjects, refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues as follows: Pay rolls, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, and Philadelphia, p. 9, 3; for revisions of years -34 for these series and for the city of Pittsburgh, see p. 2 of the March issue; pay rolls, Massachusetts, for, p. 9, August 3 and 2-34 p. 2,, revisions for period 3-May not shown in the August issue will appear in the supplement; pay rolls in wholesale and retail trade for -34, inclusive, p. 2, March ; pay rolls in dyeing and cleaning establishments and laundries, p. 2, August 4; hotels revised for the period 929-July, inclusive; see p. 2 of issue. A Revised data on Illinois pay rolls from April 929 to 2 will be shown in a subsequent issue. The revised series on dyeing and cleaning and laundry payrolls shown in the August issue have been dropped by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the publication of the original series resumed in the issue. 5 Data have been revised for the period 3- Revisions not shown in the issue, appeared on p. 6 of the issue Q i ber " "..8. "97.5 "6.2 «6.3 "6.3 «5.6 «3. 5»49.4 «92. 6 " 77'. 2 «72.. «

33 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 3 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey (5 March April May June July August EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS AND WAGES Continued WAGES-EARNINGS AND RATES Factory weekly earnings (25 industries).*^ All wage earners dollars.. Male Skilled and semiskilled..dollars.. Unskilled._ dollars.. Female.._ dollars.. All wage earners 923=.. Male: Skilled and semiskilled 923=.. Unskilled 923=. Female 923=.. Factory, av. hourly earnings (25 industries) :*tcf All wage earners _ dollars.. Male: Skilled and semiskilled dollars.. Unskilled dollars.. Female... dollars.. Factory, weekly earnings, by States: Delaware = - Illinois =.. Massachusetts*! =.. New Jersey =.. New York =. Pennsylvania =. Wisconsin =... Miscellaneous data: Construction wage rates:* Common labor (E. N. /?.).dol. per hour.. Skilled labor (E. N. R.)..dol per hour.. Farm wages, without board (quarterly) dol. per month Railways, wages (average)*.dol. per hour Road-building wages, common labor:# United States dol per hour.. East North Central dol per hour.. East South Central dol. per hour.. Middle Atlantic dol. per hour.. Mountain States dol per hour.. New England dol. per hour.. Pacific States.. dol. per hour.. South Atlantic dol. per hour.. West North Central dol. per hour.- West South Central dol. per hour.. Steel industry: U. S. Steel Corporation...dol. per hoi r Youngstown district percent base scale G S " * 28.6» " BANKING Acceptances and com'l paper outstanding: Bankers' acceptances, total..mills, of dol_. Held by Federal Reserve banks: For own account.mills, of dol.. For foreign correspondents mills, of dol.. Held by group of accepting banks, total mills, of dol Own bills.. mills of dol Purchased bills mills, of dol.- Held by others mills of dol Com'l paper outstanding mills, of dol.. Agricultural loans outstanding: Farm mortgages: Federal land banks mills, of dol.. Joint stock-land banksi mills, of dol. Land-bank commissioner*.mills. of dol - Federal intermediate credit bank loans to and discounts for:a Regional agricultural credit corp's and production credit ass'ns._mills. of dol.. All other institutions mills, of dol._ Other loans: Agricultural marketing act revolving fund loans to cooperatives! mills, of dol._ Banks for cooperatives, lncl. Central Bank*.. _ mills, of dol.. Emergency crop loans* mills, of dol._ Prod. cred. ass'ns* mills, of dol._ Regional ag. credit corp.*..mills, of dol , , , FINANCE , Revised. frevised series. For revisions on the following subjects, refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues: Massachusetts weekly earnings for p 9 August 3; and for 2-34, p. 2,. Certain classes of loans included in the figures shown through May 4 have been reclassified and removed from the agricultural category. Construction wage rates as of, common labor, $,5; skilled labor, $.8. #Beginning with March 2 data are based on Federal-aid and State projects; before that time the data are based on Federal-aid projects tjoint-stock land banks in liquidation. New series. For earlier data on the following subjects, refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues as follows: Factory weekly earnings for period of Januarv 927 through August 2, p. 2, 2; factory hourly earnings for 926-, p. 8, 2; weekly earnings Massachusetts for 926-, p. 8, 2; construction wage rates for 922-July 3, p. 9, 3. Additional series on agricultural loans were first included in the June 4 issue for land-bank commissioner for period July 3-April 4. Additional series were also included in this issue for banks for cooperatives including central bank and production credit associations for the period 923-April 4, and emergency crop loans and regional agricultural credit corporation" for April 3-April 4. Data for emergency crop loans for fiscal years from June 922-June and monthly periods 2-March 3 and regional credit corporations for 2-March 3 will be shown in a subsequent issue. Data on railway wages for period July 92-August were shown on p. 2 of the ABreak-down offiguresshown in issues up to 4 c? Data revised for the period 924 to date. For revisions see pp. 7, 8, and 9 of the issue. 8) Basic rate for common labor. Digitized for FRASER The Federal Reserve banks have held no acceptances since April , , , , , , , , ,

34 Digitized for FRASER 32 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Novera-! ber March April May June July { FINANCE Continued BANKING Continued Bank debits, total mills, of dol. New York City mills, of dol_. Outside New York City mills, of dol Brokers' loans: Reported by N. Y. Stock Exchange mills ofdol. Ratio to market value...percent. By reporting member banks: To brokers and dealers in N. Y. * mills of dol.. To brokers and dealers outside N Y.* mills, of dol Federal Reserve banks: Assets, total.._.mills, of dol. Reserve bank credit outstanding mills of dol Bills bought mills, of dol Bills discounted mills, of dol. United States securities..mills, of dol.. Reserves, total mills, of dol.. Gold reserves...mills, of dol.. Liabilities, total mills of dol Deposits, total mills, of dol.. Member bank reserves mills, of dol. Excess reserves (est.)*... mills, of dol. Notes in circulation...mills, of dol.. Reserve ratio percent.. Federal Reserve reporting member banks: Deposits: Demand, adjusted^ mills, of dol.. Time mills, of dol.. Investments mills of dol.. U. 8. Gov., total direct obligations* mills, of dol U. 8. Qov. guaranteed issues* mills, of dol_- Other securities* mills, of dol_. Loans, total.rrills. of dol. Acceptances and commercial paper* mills, of dol. On real estate* mills, of dol. To banks mills, of dol.- On securities mills, of dol._ Other loans* mills, of dol_. Interest rates: Acceptances, bankers' prime. percent.. Bank rates to customers:* In New York City percent.. In eight other northern and eastern cities.. percent.. In twenty-seven southern and western cities percent- Call loans, renewal percent Com'l paper, prime (4-6 mos.)...percent.. Discount rate, N. Y. F. R. Bank..percent.. Federal Land bank loans* percent Intermediate credit bank loans...percent.. Time loans, 9 days percent.. 8 avings deposits: New York State Savings banks mills, of dol.. U. 8. Postal Savings: Bal. to credit of depositors.thous. of dol Bal. on deposit in banks thous. of dol FAILURES (? Commercial failures: Grand total.number- Commercial service, total Construction, total Manufacturing, total Chemicals and drugs. Foods number. Forest products number. Fuels Iron and steel... Leather and leather products- Machinery Paper, printing, and publishing 37, 33 7,7 2, ,57 2,476 o 6 2,43 8,94 8,6 2, 57 7,35 6,3 2, 4, , 34 5, 3, 796 9,2,257 3,2 8,72 33, ,79 3,2 "Mo LOO Vi 5,2,255, , 577 5, 733 6, ,46 2,4 c 2,43 6 7,285 7,53,46 5,999 5,6 2,97 3, , 598 4,9 2,476 8,77,33 3, 7,92 329,46 8 3,6 3,34 H / 7* H 5,6,96,427 35, 778, ,227 5, 542 6, , 78 2, c 2,43 6 7,5 7,347, 78 6, 5,5 3, 3, ,8 4,872 2, 8,3,37 3,42 8,52 353,4 5 3,8 3,4 H ,54,98,9 2, ,36 7, 6 8, ,26 2,4 c 2,435 7,5 7,57, 26 6,3 5,587 2,4 3, ,7 4,9 2,646 8,468,26 3,52 8,249 3, ,2 3,4 H ,87,2,34 2, , 424 3, ,496 7,925 5, 9,9 7,499 5,7 7, , 2, ,43 8,6 7,8, 6,67 5, 3, 3, ,7 4,8 2,996 8,5,72 3,69 7,999,42 3,28 3, M ,77,27,97 243, 72, ,94 2,4 i 5 7 2, 43 8,2 7, ,535 5,7 2,9 3, ,9 4,9 3,47 8,69,2 3,56 7,9 349,46 3,7 3,28 H ,77,23,7 224, ,27 2, ,43 8,27 7,68,27 6,497 5,87 2, 35 3, , 578 4,99 3,229 8,643,2 3,32 8, ,44 3,33 3,4 H % ,24,25,8 22, , 7 7, 2 7,497, ,32 29, 2, ,43 8,49 7,77, 6,524 5,4 2,4 3, , 258 5,47 3, 452 8,,28 3,369 8, ,4 67 3,34 3,5 H ,,25,73 26, , 225 6, 227 6, ,54 238,2 2,4 35 2,43 8,32 7,7, 2 6,5 5,79 2,8 3, , 58 5,35 3,522 8,99,35 3,38 8,6 35, ,4 3,5 H / A A H 5,,24, 2, , 55 8, 3 8, , 5 2, ,43 8,385 8,9, 5 6,585 5,633 2,77 4, ,679 5, 4,59 9,5,2 3,36 8,46 35,45 3,39 3,69 H / A m 5,2,23,646 ",244,398 23, -7, , 6,99 8, , 9 2,4 34 2,43 8, 53 8,2, 9 6,8 6,5 3,29 3, ,85 5,5 4, 9,456, 272 3,356 8,294 39, ,73 3, % m 5, , 469 a 33, 242 4, 363 5, 6 7,6 a 7, I , j,8 2,47 i Si 2,43 I 8,579 8,32 I, 6,8 6,4, 4, ,7 5,32 3, 9,263,236 3,3 8,454 38,45 3,77 3, u ,97 ',249,3 ', New series. For earlier data on the following subjects, refer to the Indicated pages of the monthly issues. New series on "Brokers' Loans" for the period 929- are shown on p. 9 of the March issue. For new series on bank rates to customers see p. 9 of the March issue. For new series on interest rates of Federal land banks see p. 2 of the April issue. Data on excess reserves for the period Sept., -April are shown on p. 2 of the July issue. See footnote below on break-down of investments and total loans. Monthly data previous to 4 not available. Data on acceptances and commercial paper, on real estate, to banks and other loans represent a break-down of the "All other" loans total which was published prior to Oct.,. Figures subsequent to 3 represent gold certificates on hand and due from Treasury, plus redemption fund. JMethod of computing net demand deposits subject to reserve was changed by the "Banking Act of " approved Aug. 23,. Consequently figures since that date are not comparable with those for earlier periods. Data for months August 4-August were incorrectly shown in the issue. UData on Federal Reserve Reporting Member Banks represent operations in leading cities. These series, according to a statement in the Federal Reserve Bulletin for, in the main, represent a continuation of the city series published prior to the bank holiday. It is pointed out that although the banking crisis and subsequent developments affected these series considerably, the data reflect the course of banking developments during the disturbed period. Data on cities were last shown in the May 3 Survey for 3. Figures on the new basis not shown on p. 32 of the, issue will appear in a subsequent issue. c? Classifications have been changed and revised data prepared beginning with 4. These data are shown on p. 2 of the May issue* , ,43 8,9 8,397,8 6,4 6,357, 4, ,6 5,63 3,929 9,336,256 3,337 8,3 3,39 2 3,242 3,949 3 /l U Ui 5, 223,25,72 47,

35 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 33 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April May June July August FINANCE Continued FAILURES* Continued Commercial failures Continued. Grand total Continued. Manufacturing, total Continued. Stone, clay, and glass products Textiles _ Transportation equipment.. Miscellaneous Wholesale trade, total Retail trade, total.... Liabilities: Grand total thous. of dol_. Commercial service,totalthous. of dol.. Construction, total thous. of dol.. Manufacturing, total thous. of dol.. Chemicals and drugs.-thous. of dol.. Foods thous. of dol.. For&st products. thous. of dol.. Fuels thous. of dol-. Iron and steel. thous. of dol-. Leather and leather products thous. of dol.. Machinery thous. of dol.. Paper, printing, and publishing thous. of dol.. Stone, clay, and glass products thous. of dol.. Textiles thous. of dol. Transportation equipment thous. of dol- Miscellaneous. thous. of dol. Retail trade, total. thous. of dol. Wholesale trade, total.._thous. of dol. LIFE INSURANCE (Association of Life Insurance Presidents) Assets, admitted, totalf-.. mills, of dol. Mortgage loans mills, of dol. Farm mills, of dol. Other... mills, of dol Bonds and stocks held (book value) mills, of dol. Government mills, of dol. Public utility mills, of dol. Railroad mills, of dol. OtherA mills, of dol. Policy loans and premium notes mills, of dol. Insurance written:t Policies and certificates...thousands. Group thousands. Industrial thousands. Ordinary. thousands. Value, total. thous. of dol. Group thous. of dol. Industrial thous. of dol. Ordinary... thous. of dol. Premium collections t Annuities Group Industrial Ordinary thous. of dol. thous. of dol. thous. of dol. thous. of dol. thous. of dol. (Life Insurance Sales Research Bureau) Insurance written, ordinary, total mills, of dol.. Eastern district mills, of dol.. i Far Western district mills, of dol Southern district mills, of dol.. Western district....mills, of dol. Lapse rates =.. MONETARY STATISTICS Foreign exchange rates :# Argentina*. dol. per paper peso.. Belgium _ dol. per belga.. Brazil... dol. per milreis... Canada dol. per Canadian dol.. Chilei dol. per peso.. England _ dol. per.. France dol. per franc. Germany dol. per reichsmark.. India. dol. per rupee.. Italy dol. per lira.. Japan. dol. per yen.. Netherlands dol. per florin.. Spain dol. per peseta.., Sweden dol. per krona..j Uruguay dol. per peso.j , , , ,8 5, , 26 4,57 232,4 442, 2 239, 33 27, 9,46 54, 734, ,85,87 2,792 4,9 22,38, ,7 68 5,94 2,38 8, 4, , 64 3,4,978 2,63 2,76, ,43 3, ,9 459,87 244, 678 3,23 8,546 49, 79 55, ,3 73 2,9 3, ,37,38 8,922 4, 3,6 8,8 3,549 2,26 2,68 7 2,9, , 36,98 27, 45, , ,94 8,55 54,2 53, ; , 6 2,969,97 4, , ,8 4,377 3,572 9, 3,78,996 2,592 2,, ,25, 87,8 59,77 3, 64, 25, 6 94, 22 79,3 t See footnote on p. 32 marked "J\" t Revised series. Insurance written and premium collections revised for period -, see pp. 7, 8, and 9 of the issue. Admitted assets revised for period See p. 8 of this issue. The nominal official gold value of the Chilean peso was changed from 3 pence gold to US pence gold as of Jan. 2,. # Par values of foreign currencies as given on pp. and 87 of the 2 annual supplement were changed with the reduction in gold content of the United States dollar. Quotations are partly or wholly nominal for the following countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Uruguay, since April 3; Italy for the period Nov. 23,, to Apr., ; Spain, July 3 to Sept. 2, no quotations available since Sept 22,- Belgium, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, and Sweden during. Quotation based on paper peso since Dec.,3, instead of gold peso as formerly. Former equivalent to 44 percent of latter. See note on p. 56 of the March 4 issue ȦThe figures for "other" bonds and stocks held (book value) for the months of and 4 shown as 6 and million dollars, respectively, In the monthly issues from May 4 to April should read 54 for and 58 for. Digitized for FRASER ,4,7 2,435 5,4, , ,245,723 9,39 4, ,553 9,9 3,9,98 2,6 2 2, ,6 4,98, , ,6, 6 53,85 67, I , 44, 3,36 2, ,,855 9, 233 4,33 7 3,527 9,2 3,6,969 2, , ,473 3, ,55,92 25,63 25, 558 9,45 56,245 58, , 27 4,4 4, ,53,263 9, 354 4, ,56 9,42 4,8 2,22 2, ,73, ,355 56,23 246, 47,32 259,94 3, 78 9,79 58, 223 6, ,57 567,57 4, , ,58, 9, 435 4, ,49 9,58 4,76 2,43 2,9 76 2,, ,87 37, , , 237 2,49 3, 7, , 9 58, , , 2, ,3,423 9, 539 4, ,4 9,639 4,7 2,49 2, 77 2,699, ,3 59,3 23,4 459,779 25,5 3,38 9,3 55,9 55, ,77 638,5 2, ,535,43 9,64 4,22 2 3,468 9,794 4,2 2,6 2,7 7 2,69, ,978 42, 233, ,55 25, 27, 57 9,7 58,926 55, ,94,34,873 2, ,97,73 9,7 4,98 6 3,452 9,98 4,352 2,5 2,635 2,676, , 49 79, , , ,4 32, 673,47 5, 522 6, ,7 52,498, ,255,64 9, 8 4, 739 3,449, 5 4,49 2,3 2, ,7, , ,54 22, ,46 235,996 26, 9,54 58, , , 557, 3, ,39,5 9,997 4, ,439 4,437 2, 2,647 2, , 35,6 28, 387, ,4 25, 555,9 52,49 37,

36 34 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Digitized for FRASER Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey MONETARY STATISTICS Continued Gold and money: Gold: Monetary stocks, U. S._...mills, of dol. Movement, foreign: Net release from earrnark.thous. of dol_. Exports thous. of dol. Imports thous. of dol Net gold imports, including gold released from earmarka*thous. of dol.., Rand fine ounces. Receipts at mint, domestic-fine ounces.- Money in circulation, total-.mills. of dol Silver: Exports -thous. of dol.. Imports -thous. of dol._ Price at New York dol. perfineoz._, world thous. offineoz_. Canada thous. offineoz_. Mexico thous. offineoz_. United States..thous. offineoz_. Stocks, refinery, end of month: United States thous. of fineoz.. Canada. _ -.thous. offineoz_ NET CORPORATION PROFITS (Quarterly) t Industrial corporations, total..mills, of dol. Autos, parts and accessories mills, of dol_. Chemicals. mills, of dol.. Food products and beverages.mills of dol I Machinery and machine manufactures mills, of dol Metals and mining mills, of dol._. Oil mills, of dol.. _ Steel mills, of dol. Miscellaneous mills, of dol.. _ Railways, class I (net operating income) mills, of dol Telephones (net op. income)...mills, of dol. Other public utilities (net income) mills, of dol PUBLIC FINANCE (FEDERAL),9 -, , , ,38 6, , L.4 739, ,9 2, 92 4, 2 28, ,8 3, 39 5, 69 39, , 2, 9 6, 987 8, 5 9,545 -, ,424 33,4,724 9,8 5, 26, 8.4 7,2,3 5, 237 4, 8,76, Novem- Decembearary March April j May June July Septem- Janu- Febru- her ber FINANCE Continued 9, , 8 2, 4 99, 55 49, 44 5, , 4 5, ,29,43,,73 49, 377 8, 38 9,967 3, , 496, 4 68, 2 4, 3 272,5 296, , 56 2, 45 3, 346 7, ,999 42, 7 55, 442 8, 3 73,38 4, 3 2, , 7 97, 49 25, 592, 72, ,8 9,26 96, 496,7 5, , , 78,94 9, 6 3,6, , , 55 7,2 6, 85 27, 8 396, 25 5, 3 732, 78 46,34 4, 27 2, , 727 7,6 33, 425,58 -, , 98 43, 8 924,8 2,732 5, 7 58, , 5,244 6, 8 4,3, , 5 354,8 6, 699 6,6 26, 2 3,72 4, 769,32 53,7 4, 27 35, 296,6 94, ,8,63-9, 56 23, 637 7,2-26,4 4, 4 25, 529 5, , , 2,44 7,59 5,56,873 73, , 672 6,28 5, , ,99 42,56 77,2,72 2,35 7, 7 6,449 3,776 56, 435 5, ,5.4 2, 259,5 6, 5, 329, ,2 285, 54 5, 557 5,7 24, 543 3,239 4, ,32 i 59,67 4, 27 35, , 5 3,5 35, , 436 7, ,327 4,, ,6 27,9 92, ,6 5, , , 497, 499 5,7 5,46, , , 9 5, , ,68 4, , , , 7 296, , 35, 324-3, ,7, 76 8, 5 8,4 5, , , 722, 276 6,7 4, 4 Debt, gross, end of month mills, of dol.. 33,3 29,4 29, 634 3, 557 3,56 3, 52 3, 459 3, 425 3,636 Expenditures, total (incl. emergency) tf thous. of dol 739,979 87, 6 573, , 2 57,44 643, 98 68,57 59,6 Receipts, totali.thous. of dol ,7 2, , , 779, ,9 2,45 Customs thous. of dol.. 4, ,276 3,226 29, 23 33, , , 226 3,268 Internal revenue, total thous. of dol.. 99,2 92, 28,96 2, 7, 7 85, 69, 5 22, 78, Income tax.-thous. of dol.. 3, ,23 2, 3 228,999 36, , 29 35,.27 34,57 Taxes from:* Admissions to theaters, etc. thous. of dol.., 797,4,7,5. 46,45, 255, 2,39 Capital stock transfers, etc. thous. of dol.. 2, 2,32 2,4 3, 2,87 4,33 3,9 2,992 2, 357 Sales of produce (future delivery) thous. of dol Sales of radio sets. etc..-thous. of dol Reconstruction Finance Corporation loans outstanding, end of month:f Grand total thous. of dol. 2,2,29 2,87,2 2,79,734 2,728,6 2,,437!,,734 2,649,85 2,632,263 2,57,2 Total section 5 as amended thous. of dol.. Bank and trust companies, including receivers thous. of dol Building and loan associations thous. of dol.. Insurance companies-.thous. of dol Mortgage loan companies thous. of dol Railroads, incl. receivers thous. of dol All other under section 5 thous. of dol.. Total Emergency Relief and Construction Act as amended.thous. of dol_. Self-liquidating projects thous. of dol Financing of exports of agricultural surpluses thous. of dol_. Financing of agricultural commodities and livestock thous. of dql._ Amounts made available for relief and work relief thous of dol.. Total Bank Conservation Act as amended thous. of dol.. Other loans and authorizations thous. of dol.. Revised. v Preliminary. A-Or exports ( )., , 5 267, 4,99 5,8 26, 534 3, 27 39,9 6,58 72, ,54-24, , , 9 944, 57, 8 6, 97 23, , 354, 45 7, 57 5, 2, *> ,779 2,46,77 564,67 32, , , 87,532, i «45,67 «, 392 '5,7 I 52,792, 9 2, 2 6 6, 7, , 9 264, 4 6, , 5 '9,9 6, 457 4,, 345, s * ,455 I.543 I j 733,535 I 37 I, 7(U -28, b ,9 967, , 63 6,258 Data are compiled by the American Bureau of Metal Statistics and represent the estimated world output. The series for the period 928-August 4 presented in the SURVEY covered the principal producing countries which produced the following percentages of the world total: 928, 87.9; 929, 87.;, 85.5;,.; 2,.5; and 3, J Series revised to include emergency expenditures. Figures as shown in SURVEY for months prior to May 2 are comparable with this series. Comparable figures for the period May 2 to March 3 are on p. 33 of the June 4 issue. Later data are shown in monthly issues IFor 4 includes $2,,22,38 for, $2,233,252 for March, $49,52 for April, $298,8 for May, $23,447 for June, $272,63 for July, $268,24 for August, $34,3 for, $73,72 for, $6,585 for, $32,296 for. For includes $23,639 for, $68,24 for, $57,326 for March, $,44 for April, $96,3 for May, $5,773 for June, $,29 for July, $,55 for August, $,6 for, $56,256 for, $,78 for, and $7,9 for. For include $6,222 for, $43,46 for, $58,427 for March, $55,254 for April, $42,2 for May. $4,856 for June, $2,7 for Julv, $37,9 for August, 79, , 46, , 287 4, 26 5,5 23, 3,432 39, 39 8, 6 68, , , ,94, 33,444 57, 6 322, , 327 4, 8, 568, ,363. 4,22b,26 2,2f, 2, , , 523 3, 4, , , 38 7, 73 3, , ~29 6, , , 8GC , , KOG 33, 528! , 642 2, 42 $34,434 *"''"" for, " ' ' and, $9, for, -.. representing the increment resulting from reduction in weight of - the gok, o]d do]lar : *For earlier data on net gold imports see p. 2 of the 2 issue. For new sprip* for imprmi rpvpnnp i'ix mo from to theaters, capital stock transfers, and sales of radios, see p. 2 of the Feb. issue. For new series on sales of produce (future delivery), see p. 9 of the April issue. These figures exclude the following amounts, $499,, reliel grants to State- <iuaei i.ie cnur^m:*»teuei voi o../3s. *.,U-y)JU.o>)U under tue provisions of the Emergency Appropriation Act of approved June 9, 4, $5,, under the provisions of the Emergency Relief Act of approved Apr. 8, and other allocations to Federal agencies. f Revised series. All series of corporation profits revised for period For revised data see p. 5 of the August issue. The data of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation has been revised to include the statistics of certain loaning agencies of the Corporation not included heretofore and for revisions made in recent audits. data for 2-March, inclusive, are shown on p. 2 of the issue., 7, S , b " 79 ],'! r Revised

37 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 35 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April May June July August Septem ber CAPITAL FLOTATIONS New Security Registrations Fully Effective* (Securities and Exchange Commission) Estimated gross proceeds: Total thous. of dol_. Common stock thous. of dol Preferred stock thous. of dol.. Certificates of participation, etc. thous. of dol. Debentures and short term notes thous. of dol. Secured bonds thous. of dol Securities Issued (Commercial and Financial Chronicle)^ Total, all issues.. thous. of dol.. Domestic, total thous. of dol Foreign, total.. thous. of dol._ Corporate, total thous. of dol- Industrial thous. of dol._ Investment trusts.thous. of dol. Land, buildings, etc thous. of dol. Long-term issues thous. of dol.. Apartments and hotels thous. of dol. Officeand commercial-thous. of dol_. Public utilities- _.._ thous. of dol Railroads thous. of dol_. Miscellaneous thous. of dol.. Farm loan and Gov't agencies thous. of dol. Municipal, States, etc. thous. of dol. Purpose of issue* New capital, total thous. of dol_. Domestic, total thous. of dol. Corporate thous. of dol. Farm loan and Gov't agencies thous. of dol. Municipal, States, U. S. possessions, etc thous. of dol. Foreign thous. of dol.. Refunding, total - thous of dol Corporate thous. of dol Type of security, all issues: Bonds and notes, total thous. of dol.. Corporate thous. of dol- Stocks thous. of dol- Bond Buyer State and municipals: Permanent (long term) thous. of dol. Temporary (short term) thous. of dol. COMMODITY MARKETS Volume of trading in futures:* Wheat thous of bu Corn thous. of bu.. SECURITY MARKETS Bonds Prices: All listed bonds (N. Y. S. E.) dollars.. Domestic issues dollars.. Foreign issues dollars. _ Domestic (Dow-Jones) (4) percent of par 4% bond.. Industrials () percent of par 4% bond.. Public utilities () percent of par 4% bond.. Rails, high grade () percent of par 4% bond.. Rails, second grade () percent of par 4% bond.. Domestic* (Stand. Stat.) (45) dollars.. U. S. Government (Stand. Stat.)*.dollars- Foreign (N. Y. Trust) (4)..percent of par._ Sales on registered exchanges (Securities and Exchange Commission):* Total on all exchanges:* Market value thous. of dol_. Par value thous. of dol.. On New York Stock Exchange: + Market value thous. of dol.. Par value* thous. of dol. Sales on the New York Exchange excl of stopped salesx (Dow-Jones): Par value: Total thous. of dol Liberty and Treasury bonds thous. of dol, 526, 33 2, ,643 29, , 9o 4, 2 464,7 449, 7 5, 38, 42 64,4 6, ,2 9,5 37,,, 363,694 73, 694 9, 5 78, 5, 276, 7 27, , ,34 72, 8, 49 8,369 54,8 3, ) 329,4 42, 739 2, , 396,97 46, ,47, 7, 558, ,2 368,2 252, 3,499 4, 4 4 8, 644,77 38, 9 76,764,4, 4 73,3 5, 6, ,9 79, , 5 233,7 8, 7, , 87,,776 97, ,78 387,52 229, ,23 2,727 5,997 FINANCE Continued 2,772 55, 39 7,8,55 3, 7 94, 3, 22 3, 22 25, 53 32, ,53 7, 254 4,464 9, 794 9,794 33, 2, 55 2, ,25 378, , 3 3, 37,45 6, 6 6, 949 9, ,22 45,38 27,4 34,29 3,977 9,252 22,85 4, 2 2,873 4,777 55, 29, 4, ,422 4, 67,355 64, 54 2, 25 25, 343 2,9 e, 68 2,5 33, ,27 22,27, 738 4, 29 4,79 24,26, ,96 32, 8 34,4 26, 454 3, , 673, , 4,72 239, , 57 34, 429 2, 464 2, ^25,27 9, 35 24, 96 4,4 354, 4 56, 273,97 5, , 55 94, 59 2, 77 23,253 5,253 72, 5 5,38 8, 287, 57 2, , , 97 4,,726 8,5 4,4 53, , , , 6 492,24 476,37 33,8 22, 27,3 3,464 3,78 4,25 98, 679 3,978 3,978 94,63 37, 5 5, 25 35,45 6,43, 2 97, 6,739 6, 739 3,473 4,,2, 239,4 28,85 73, 45 2,63 94,56 22, 8 32,637 45, , 2 5,2 35, 52 42, 6,45, 5, 39 8, 59 28, 7 7,442 3, , , 35 3, 85 23, 5 594,853, 3 26, ,39 8,85 2, 28, , ,527 58,, 59,7 637, 4 536, 37 3, 9 594,853 23, 692 2,85 37, 29 4, 52, , 26 4, 4 26, , 6 2,2,2,,, 3 68, , , 373 3,5 379,436,2,32 9, 532 3,5 687, 236,6 35,587 22,97 3, ,78 2,63 76, , ,879, 7 3,36 559, 872 5, 533 3, ,498,9, 8,6 92, ,878 3, , , 792 7, 52 8, 39, 39, 3, 56 3, 73 6,69 79,8 43,359 43, ,9 33, 2 4,8 6,96, 727,4 9, 67 98, 694,57,57 37, 6S 5,9 68,63 3,7 267, ,49 2,25 39, 96, 396, 7 59,79 8, , , 63,9 97, 27 23, 7 523, 439 2, 7 77, 37,3, ,7 73, 73, 527, 63 99, 3, 85, 336 6, , , 429 9,7 27, 27 27, 27 5, 8, 64, , 6,98 4, , 8,2 9, 9 768, 278, , , 3 23, 27,44 2,5,34 2,35, 3, 925, 56 5,3 32, 8 59, 3 7, , 3 338, 3 294,3 49, 5 7, J25, 49, 49, 69 37, ,9 2, , 32, 9 235,64 224, 5 35, 26,94 33,99 43, , 6,328,69 45, , , , 7 287, 5 29, 2, 22 92, 35, 728 4, 7, 25 45,634 2,555 2, , 438 6, ,473 5, 5 2, 492 7,8 55, 37 26,5 26, 5 7, ,72 79,44 6, , 29 2,73 3, 2 67, 447 8,2,32,278 3, ) 22,368 2, 36 79, , , ,8 76,4 29, 27 7,22 9,539 27,98,9,9oy 25, 5,42 4, 5 2, 5 24, 4,9 58,99 78, 9 78, 9, 59 4, ,97, 4 363,534 24, 5 45, 425 a i59, 2 a 5,8 6, 23, ) 287, 378, 52 24,2 322, 4,87,96 94,

38 36 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Novem- [ ber FINANCE Continued March April May June July August SECURITY MARKETS Continued Bonds Continued Value, issues listed on N. Y. S. E.: Par, all issues mills, of dol Domestic issues mills, of dol _. Foreign issues mills, of dol Market value, all issues mills, of dol.. Domestic issues mills, of dol Foreign issues mills, of dol Yields: Domestic (Standard Statistics) (6) t percent Industrials (5) percent Municipals (5)t percent.. Public utilities (5) percent- Railroads (5) _. percent- Domestic, municipals (Bond Buyer) (2) percent.. Domestic, U. S. Government: U. S. Treasury bonds* percent- Cash Dividend and Interest Payments and Bates Dividend payments (N. Y. Times) thous. of dol. _ Industrial and miscellaneous thous. of dol Railroad.- thous. of dol._ Dividend payments and rates (Moody's): Dividend payments, annual payments at current rate (6 companies) mills, of dol.. Number of shares, adjusted millions.. Dividend rate per share, weighted average (6) dollars Banks (2) dollars.. Industrial (492) dollars Insurance (2) dollars Public utilities (3). dollars. Railroads (36) dollars.. PH(, M. Stocks r rices. Dow-Jones: Industrials (3) dol. per share.. Public utilities (2) dol. per share.. Railroads (2)._ dol. per share New York Times (5) dol. per share- Industrials (25) dol. per share Railroads (25). _. dol. per share Standard Statistics (49)t Industrials (347) t 926=.. Public utilities (4)t Railroads (32)f 926=.. Banks, N. Y. (9)f 926=.. Fire insurance (8) f.926=- Sales: Market value of shares sold: All registered exchanges, total* thous. of dol.. On New York Stoplc T^xpharifffl * 45, S 39, 9 5,3 43,8 39,7o\ 3, , , 269 7,428, , 33 35,54 7, ,7 32,543 5, , 5,55 6,4, ,232 34,987 7,245 38, 4 32,78 5, , ,2 369,279 28,2, , 8 35, 69 7,2 39, , 5, ,43 28,69 2,794, Volume of shares sold: thous - of dol -,9,7,9,69,2,,738,247 2,69,564 2,4, 2,92,38,679,9,77,672,2,9,526,76,2,924,387,439 On all registered exchanges, total* thous. of shares. _ 79, 992 8,6 99,4,87 9,592 2,963,923 77,96 47, 43, 7 64, 728 5, 7 59, 7 On New York stock exchange: * Total (Sec. and Exch. Com.) % thous. of shares- 6,9,555 77,4 63,344 87,52 85,35,532 56,5 35,943 3,7,272 37, Total excl. of odd lot and stopped sales (New York Times)..thous. of shares.. 43,998 46,3 57,463 45,59 67, 2 6,87 5,25 39, 2, 2,428 34, , 564 3,872 Values, and shares listed, N. Y. S. E.: Market value all listed shares.mills. of dol 58, 57 43,2 44, 46,946 5, 5,22 5,8 47, 7 49,998 5,92 54, 67 54,532 55,5 Number of shares listed millions..,349,37,39,38,32,323,33,337,339,34,34,344,3 Yields* Preferred, Standard Statistics: Industrials, high grade (2) percent Stockholders (Common Stock) American Tel. & Tel. Co., total 7, 3, , , 457 Foreign 7,5 7,859 _ 7, 7,54 Pennsylvania Railroad Co., total number 227,25 225,2 223,4 22, 327 Foreign number 3, 3, 3,87 3,76 U. S. Steel Corporation, total., 68 8,4... "77, 8 73,633 Foreign number 3,925 3,87 3,94 3,8 Sharps hflld hv brokers percent of total Value: INDEXES Exports, unadjusted =- Exports, adjusted for seasonal variation =.. Imports, unadjusted =- Imports, adjusted for seasonal variation [ Quantity exports: =.. Total, agricultural products:! Unadjusted 9-4=.. Adjusted* 9-4=.. Total, excluding cotton: Unadjusted _ 9-4 ==.. Adjusted* ,3 35,85 7,263 4, 3 34,4 5, ,328,35 44,35, ,5 35, 4 7, 4, 5 34,6 5, , ,7 4,, ,255 37,96 7,59 4,87 36,77 5, ,42 92,324 7,78, , ,5 7,73 4, ,922 5, , 55,59 6,5, , , 242 5,3 39,6 36, 2 3, ,552 3, 35 34, 57, * ,64 39,28 5,36 4,69 38, 2 3, , 237, 5 26,, , 98 38, 947 5, 34 4, , 242 3, ,96 25, 3 2,, ,279 39,24 5,38 42, ,776 3, ,98 37, 4,, ,2 4,78 <6,33 43, 35 39,3 3, , ,642 5,, ,57,963,92,6 2,25,677,979,49 2,439,29 2, ,429,96,6,,223,444,64,47 2,57,5,7,52,2,2 v 6 58 i 59 t FOREIGN TRADE 52 28! 9 Preliminary. New series. For earlier data see p. 2 of the August 4 issue, yield on United States domestic long-term bonds (all issues except those due or callable within 8 years) for years ; for data for years see p. 2 of the issue. Series on stock sales on all registered exchanges and on the New York Stock Exchange as compiled by the Securities and Exchange Commission for the period 4- are shown on p. 2 of the April issue. For quantity exports adjusted for seasonal variation for the period July 94-August see p. 8 of the issue. t For earlier data on yield of domestic and municipal bonds see pp. 9 and 33 of the April 3 issue. Data covering the Standard Statistics indexes of stock prices have been revised. The revision, however, did not change the indexes materially. Revised data not shown above will appear in the Supplement. X The difference in the figures covering the volume of stock sales on the New York Stock Exchange since April is due to stopped and odd lot sales being Digitized for FRASER included in the figures of the Securities and Exchange Commission. These are excluded in the figures reported by the New York Times , I 6! 5! I 4! !

39 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 37 Monthly statistics through, ;ogether with explanatory footnotes and references in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey. March April May June July August FOREIGN TRADE Continued VALUE Exports, incl. reexports thous. of dol.. J 264, 22, ,3 223, 54 By grand divisions and countries: Africa., thous. of dol_. 8,878 9,427 9, Asia and Oceania thous. of dol.. 34,43 I 5,58 5, 946 Japan.. - thous. of dol_ 6,42 26,945 26,5 Europe thous. of dol 5,35 44, 5, France thous. of dol., 6 8,87 5, 7 Germany thous. of dol.. 9,5 4,363 2,327 Italy. thous. of dol. 6,529 9,25 7,944 United Kingdom thous. of dol 59,98, 4,3 North America, northern..thous. of dol. 3, 28,7 22,5,7 Canada thous. of dol_ 3,349 27,473 2,76 North America, southern..thous. of dol. 8,9 8,8 7, 729 Mexico thous. of dol 5,87 5,353 6,25 South America -thous. of dol 3,728 7, 57 3,46 Argentina thous. of dol 3,436 4,9 3,556 Brazil thous. of dol 3,44 4,537 3,276 Chile. thous. of dol,,698,26 By economic classes: Exports, domestic thous. of dol 26,963 28,38 2,73 22,977 Crude materials thous. of dol.,,64 2, 678,685 Raw cotton mills, of dol Foodstuffs, total thous. of dol. 24,923 23,6 26, 78 9,697 Foodstuffs, crude thous. of dol. 7,49 7,9 5,925 5,69 Foodstuffs, mfgd thous. of dol. 7, 433 5, 72 2,855 4,528 Fruits and prep mills, of dol Meats and fats mills, of dol Wheat and flour mills, of dol Manufactures, semi- thous. of dol. 3G, 8 3,29 34,39 3,72 Manufactures, finished..thous. of dol. 99,3 8, 5 92,3,4 Autos and parts mills, of dol Gasolme mills, of dol Machinery mills, of dol Imports, total #<?._. thous. of dol. 22,, 24 69,3,4 Imports for consumption* thous. of dol. 23, 29, 6, 79,5 By grand divisions and countries: #<$ Africa thous. of dol. 2,579 3,235 3, Asia and Oceania thous. of dol. 57,39 46,23 55,6 Japan thous. of dol. 6,594 4,6 4,23 Europe thous. of dol.,53 55,9 56,9 France thous. of dol. 7,5 5,433 5,68 Germany thous. of dol. 7,72 6,738 8,52 Italy thous. of dol. 4,723 4,528 3,553 United Kingdom thous. of dol. 5, 4,24 3, 577 North America, northern...thous. of dol. 29, 27, ,9 Canada thous. of dol. 28, ,576 27,32 North America, southern..thous. of dol., 8,9,39 Mexico thous. of dol. 3,227 3, 4,22 South America thous. of dol. 24, 22, 25,2 Argentina thous. of dol 5,25 4,498 5,54 Brazil... thous. of dol. 9,4 8,53 9,44 Chile thous. of dol.,344 2,424,969 By economic classes: id Crude materials thous. of dol., 8 55,398 46,45 55,737 Foodstuffs, crude thous. of dol. 33, 29,492 24,942 27,6 Foodstuffs, manufactured.thous. of dol. 27, 52 22, 256 8,99 7,72 Manufactures, semi- thous. of dol. 4, ,587 36, 35 42, 768 Manufactures, finished thous. of dol., 6 43,5 36, 36,253 TRANSPORTATION Express Operations Operating revenue thous. of dol._ Operating income -thous. of dol._ Electric Street Railways Fares, average (268 cities) cents.. Passengers carriedt thousands.. Operating revenues! thous. of dol Steam Railways Freight carloading (F. R. B.): Index, unadjusted = Coal =. Coke =.. Forest products =.. Grain and products _ =.. Livestock =., Merchandise,. c = Ore =- Miscellaneous =.. Index, adjusted _ = Coal = Coke = Forest products =. Grain and products =. _ Livestock = Merchandise,. c = Ore = Miscellaneous =.. 97,8 7,7 4, 29 8,3 9, 9,6 7,36 5,42 37,3 27,39 26,99 6, 6 5,642 4,27 3,7 3,,,85 59, ,3 4,349, , 9, ,44,35 4,22 56,977 5, 53,4 5,539 5,729 2,9 5,99 24, 6 24,272 23,2 3, 23, 4,8 9,58,42 58,42 26,543 28,733 39, ,8 j 94,792! 92,9 2,6 8,37 32, 553 3, 25, 697 9, 794 8, 7,57 32,34 25, , 2 6, 28 5,277 5,36 4,54 4,24,254 79, 5, , 763 4,2, ,39, , 776, 5 4,4 58, 59 4,435 5, 4,32 5, 2,5 6,32 23,2 22,926 24,636 4,6 27,247 4,638,53 3,787 58,63 28, 5 3,547 4,6 3. 5,553 38,332 6, 4,2 8,3 9,4 6, 32,2 27,945 27,356 9,5 6,3 5,438 3,876 4,9,2 92,8 44, ,8 5,87, ,96 98, ,6 94, 28 4,6 57,435 2,926 55,49 5,347 6, 2,947 6, 73 27,222 26,6 24,252 5, ,8 9,4 2,8 57, 9 3,22 32,338 36, ,25 39, 337 6,2 78, 247 9,3 7,787 4,7 27, 54 32,28 3,557 7, 92 5,2 5, 8 4,3 3,,5, 4, ,99 4,949 9, ,, , 7 99, 787 5,8, 67 3, 2 5, 637 4,538 5, 87 3,7 4,72 26, ,7 25, 9 4,6 23, 925 5, 223 7,26 3,442, 76 28, 69 37, 35 37, , 49 TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATIONS 8., , ,558 55, '4 8. 2, 27 53, , ,787 58, , ,242 57,8 63 7, ,42 56, , , " 298 I 79*, ,2 9,326 38,92 4, 68 78,97 7,3 7,24 5,697 3, 45 37, 5 36, 6 8, 535 6,243 8,36 4,57 4,4,676 96, 42, ,925 4,, ,5 3, ,, 42 4,236 58,857 2,63 63, 722 4,356 5, 3,2 4,53 29,27 28,4 22,8 3,9 9,67 3,7 5,3 2,7 55,7 2, 9 34,8 38,456 39,56, 98 8,8 38, 7 3, 7 69, 4 8,8 6, 54 4,299 27, 35, ,8 6, 7 5,8 5, 8 4,6 3,7 9 8, 6 39, ,59 4,42, ,7 92, , 387, 2 2,97 6, 76,3 55, 4,578 6,8 3,57 4, 676 3, 3, ,344 3,77 2, 59 3,44 6,55,6 54, 22,8 36, 43, ,8, 5 35, 725,9 64, 4 6,4 7,4 2,873 27, 38 32, 6 3, 296 7, 6, 9, 243 5,7 3,56,54 76,397 3, , 36 3,7, , 2 97, ,4 96, 56 2,5,9 2,36 56,637 4,9 7,439 3,2 4, 37 3,4 3,78 9,299 3,9 9, 72 3,49 6,739,735 56,22 24, ,726 42, 38, ,34 8,8 33, 57, , 978 8,4 5, 2,285 33,223 32, 25 3,56 8,528 6,3 5,59 4,24 3,557,7, , ,6 5,725 3, 8.7 S.I.7 32, , , 3 2, 9 3,59, 7, 3 59, 9 5,778 6,332 3,45 5,877 37,6 37, 2, 929 3, ,4 7,785,9 6,3 28, 7 27, 63 4, 4,356 22,49 9,45 43,4 2,328 98, 7 4,929,23 2,8 47,498 32,42 3,498 9, 37 6,38 6,596 4,946 3,56,5 27,535 72, ,349 5, 697 7, ,, 58 2, ,645 28,37 $ Data revised for 3. See p. 2 of the 4 issue; for 4 revisions, see p. 2 of the issue. fbeginnmg with 4, import data represent imports for consumption (goods entering consumption channels immediately upon arrival, plus withdrawals for consumption from bonded warehouses) and are not comparable with earlier figures, which consist of general imports (goods entered for storage in bonded warehouses, plus goods entering consumption channels upon arrival in the U. S.). frevised series. Data for 929-May, inclusive, on electric railway passengers carried and operating revenues for 2-April, inclusive, are shown on p. 9 of the August issue. Data on electric railway passengers carried through are based on estimates for 2 companies, and for on estimates for 24 companies. *New series. Data prior to April 3 on value of imports for consumption will be shown in a subsequent issue. Data revised for 2. See p. 34 of the March 3 issue. Other revisions for the year 2 were shown on p. 34 of the April, May, 3, and 4 issues. For revised data for months of 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue, and for 4 revisions, see p. 9 of the issue. Digitized for FRASER 8, ,37 57, , ,943 55, ,396 53, , , ,923 68, 5 5,98 67,763 6,68 7,428 3,434 6, 6 35, 8 34, 6 6,924 2,9 25, 45 6,859 9,636,299 69,437 3,63 33,49 4,87 43, , ,

40 38 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey No b v e e r m ' March April May June July August TRANSPORTATION Continued Steam Railways Continued Freight carloading (A. A. It.): Total cars^ _ thousands.. Coal..thousands.. Coke..thousands.. Forest products thousands -. Grain and products...thousands.. Livestock thousands.. Merchandise,. c. L thousands.. Ore thousands.. Miscellaneous thousands.. Freight-car surplus, total thousands.. Box thousands.. Coal thousands.. Financial operations (ClassI Railways): Operating revenues}.thous. of dol. Freightt - thous. of dol. Passengerf thous. of dol. Operating expensesf thous. of dol_. Net railway operating incomef thous. of dol.. Operating results (Class I Railways): Freight carried mile mills, of tons.. Receipts per ton-mile..cents.. Passengers carried mile millions.. Travel Airplane travel: Express carried*.. pounds.. Miles flown* thous. of miles.. Passengers carried* Passenger-miles flown* thous. of miles.. Hotel business: Average sale per occupied room dollars.. Rooms occupied percent of total.. Foreign travel: Arrivals, U. S. citizens number,. Departures, U. S. citizens number. Emigrants. Immigrants._. Passports issued number. National parks:f Visitors number. Automobiles _.number. Pullman Co.: Passengers carried thousands- Revenues, total thous. of dol. TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATIONS Continued 4, , , , 56 33,94 26,22, 85 Waterway Traffic Canals: Cape Cod thous. of short tons.. 28 New York State thous. of short tons.. Panama, totalf thous. of long tons.. "2," 463' U. S. vessels thous. of long tons.. 9 St. Lawrence thous. of short tons..,3 Sault Ste. Marie thous. of short tons.., 7 Suez thous. of metric tons.. Welland thous. of short tons.. "I~646 Rivers: Allegheny thous. of short tons Mississippi (Government barges)# thous. of short tons.. 29 Monongahela thous. of short tons_. 2, Ohio (Pittsburgh to Wheeling) thous. of short tons..,452 Ocean traffic:! Clearances, vessels in foreign trade thous of net tons.. Foreign thous. of net tons.. United States. thous. of net tons. Shipbuilding. (See Trans. Equip.) COMMUNICATIONS Telephones:* Operating revenues Station revenues Tolls, message Operating expenses Net operating income.. Telephones in service, ( Telegraphs and cables: Operating revenues Commercial telegraph Operating expenses Operating income thous. of dol. thous. of dol. thous. of dol thous. of dol. thous. of dol. md of mo. thousands. thous. of dol. tolls.thous. of dol _ thous. of dol. thous. of dol_ S 799, 2 5, , , 9 77, 7 24,926 «3, 5 "67 "56 "78 "6 " «57 ' , 39 ' "28; '232, 522 ", 455 3, , , ,454 2,225 «, ,44 5,58 I 3,67,9! ,2 7,924 28, , , 59 3,3 4, 2 4, ",294 Q 2, 3,278 4, 43, , , 63 59, 32 8, 529 4,52 9, 7, 545 7,9,452 3, , , 33 2, 46 27, 8 28, 5 54, ,468.9, , ,87 2,5, ,77 6 5, 3,33, 36,9 4,3 5, 534 2, ,78 2, 856 4, 22 "34,87, 732 I,246 I 3,4 ] 85, 33 56, , 7, 3 4, 568 9,96 6,2 7.78,2! , ,4 26,.987, , , ,4 4, 35 2.S,43 4, 6 4, , , , ,2! "36,9 ",4,49 4,94. 56, 55 22, 34 6, 685 7, 367 4, , 8,4,377 2, , 99 24,6 34, 2 23, , 7 27,858.96, ,49 7 2, , , 52 3,, ,3 4,245 44, 6 8, , 6 7, 3 2,98 2, "49,43 all, 45, 533 5, 35, 7 57, 67 2, 8 59,498 7, ,223 7, , , , , 45 3, , 96 33, 5 29,53.,5 8 2,55, , 35 3,49, , 2 3,8 4, 33 IS, , 99 2,, 926 2, 252 4,98 "42, 2S "2, 27, 359 4, , , 329 2,27 57, 649 7, 6 4, 9 8,978 6, 85 7,7 76 2, , , 34 25, 3, , , 26 27, , , , , ,639 3,225,44 535, 736 4, 7, 926 3, , , 8 2,8 2, 59 8,7 a 47, "4,2,32 4, 479, 99 57, , , 5 9, 4, 92, 46 7,7 8,2, 326 2, , ,4 256, 322 3, 3 235, 73 4, 5 28,45.5, ,43, ,9 226, ,872 3,329,542 4, 55 4,5 7,449 3, , 24, 49 2,34 3,6 5,59 "67, 767 "2,68,353 4,438, 4 57, 7 23, , 543 8, 5, 4 9,996 7,2 8,56,47 3, , ,9 2, 727 3, 35 24, 234 4,2 29, 4.9, ,42 94,3 8,7 2,25, ,36,246 6,57 3,9 2,55 4, 798 5, , , 2,6 2,643 3,67 27, 725 "44,34 "43,28,2 4,63, 29 57, 4 23,4 59,64 9, 5, 9,97 7,787 8,32,292 2, , , , , 5 24, 5, 33 28, 76.23, ,46 9,27 9,5,98, ,457,39 6,34 4,2 2,3 7,42 5, 97, 453 4, , 38 22, 732 2,527 3,8 3,35 "3.39 "9, 5,43 4,, 68 57, ,6 59, 778 9, 268 5,, 55 8,244 8,53,63 2, , ,4 2, ,87 2, 3 6, 7 3,44.2 2, , , 2, 5, ,564,399 6,564 4, 2,46 63, 7 6,43,72 44, ,346 36, 36 2,78 3,57 6,98 "5, 7 ", 8,56 5,9 9,29 57, 68 25, 46,36 8, 298 5, 549, 534 8,258 8, 78,399 3, , , 585 2, 39, , , 68 32, , ,396,58,6, 699 2,554, ,3,46 6,6 4,694 2,92 5, 358 6,46 6,43 43, , 23 57, 67 3,4 3, 8,98 '2, 72 l, 9, 5 5, 2, 57 56, , ,96 8, 853 5, 2,2 8,, 3, , " , 33, ,54,3,4 2,72, ,569,425 6,8 4, 2,6 2, 5,6 '.239 "43,5 Revised. # Includes tonnage in both upper and lower Mississippi River. Revised figures prior to 4 will be shown in subsequent issue. frevised series. For earlier data see p. 9 of the April 4 issue for operating revenues, operating expenses, and net railway operating income of class I railways. For revisions of data for clearances of vessels in foreign trade, see p. 36 of the 4 issue. For revisions on Panama Canal from August 94 to June, see p. 9 of the issue. National park data revised for period See p. 2 of this issue. * New series. Data on airplane travel covers scheduled air lines operating in United States. For data on passengers carried for period of 926 to 3 and passenger-miles flown from to 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue. For data on miles flown and express carried from 926 through 3, see p. 9 of the issue New series on telephones as compiled by Federal Communications Commission. Data supersede those published in previous issues of the Survey which covered all carriers having annual operating revenues in excess of $25,; present series for 4 and are for 57 carriers representing about percent of all carriers according to the 2 census, based on revenues for all companies. Beginning, data are for carriers representing about percent. For revisions for,, and , 5, 6 2, 4, 6,564 25S, 4 77, 72,59 4,929 9, 8 58, 44 24, 6, 923 9, 277 5, ; stations in service, 4,799,676; for : Total operating revenues, $,6,99; station revenues, $54,99,279; message tolls, $2,69,36; operating expenses, $58,242,6; net operating income, $7,3,45; stations in service, 4,92,7. Digitized for FRASER This figure covers room revenue only. Data for August, and, May and August are for 5 weoks; other months, 4 weeks.

41 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 39 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS March April May June July August CHEMICALS Alcohol; Denatured: Consumption (disposed of) thous. of wine gal. thous. of wine gal- Stocks, end of month.thous. of wine gal- Ethyl: thous. of proof gal. Stocks, warehoused, end of month thous. of proof gal. Withdrawn for denaturing thous. of proof gal- Tax paid* thous. of proof gal. Methanol: Exports, refined gallons. Price, refined, wholesale, N. Y. dol. per gal. : Crude *ta gallons. Synthetic... gallons. Explosives: Shipments! thous. of lb. Sulphur and sulphuric acid: Sulphur, production (quarterly)* long tons. Sulphuric acid (4 plants): Consumed in production of fertilizer short tons. Price, wholesale,, at works dol. per short ton. short tons. Purchases: From fertilizer infrs short tons. From others short tons. Shipments: To fertilizer mfrs short tons. To others. short tons. FERTILIZER Consumption, Southern States'! thous. of short tons.. Exports, totalf long tons.. Nitrogenousf long tons.. Phosphate materials! long tons-.. Prepared fertilizers long tons.. Imports, total!# long tons.. Nitrogenous! long tons.. Nitrate of soda! long tons.. Phosphates! long tons.. Potash! long tons.. Price, nitrate of soda, percent, N. Y. dol. per cwt._ Superphosphate, bulk: short tons.. Shipments to consumers short tons.. Stocks, end of month short tons,. Pine oil: NAVAL STORES gallons.. Rosin, gum: Price, wholesale "B", N. Y dol. per bbl._ Receipts, net 3 ports bbl. (5 lb.)._ Stocks, 3 ports, end of month, bbl. (5 lb)._ Rosin, wood: bbl. (5 lb.) Stocks, end of month bbl. (5 lb.) Turpentine, gum: Price, wholesale, N. Y dol. per gal._ Receipts, net, 3 ports bbl. (5 gal.)-- Stocks, 3 ports, end of month.bbl. (5 gal.).. Turpentine, wood: bbl. (5gal.)_._ Stocks, end of month bbl. (5 gal.)._ OILS, FATS, AND BYPRODUCTS Animal fats and byproducts and fish oils (quarterly): Animal fats:! 6,3 5,34,6 22, 8,2 26, 258 2, 2,6.38 5,54 3,278,52 36, , 43,439 3,7 23,477 56, ,426 37, 2 27, ,5,8 9,53 2, 7 57, , , 94, 57, 77,78.4 8, 533 3,72 8, 73 2, 634 7, 947 7,6 2,35 23, 9 6, 4 29, 2,445 2, ,233 2,58,978 29, 498 3, , , 396 7, 54 28, 3 5, 5 6,5 34, 29 5, 797,36 7,6 39,, 64 4, 4 2,. 2 28,2 87,33,2,47 323, ,97 36, 8 43, 79 76,3. 2, ,539 6,9 3,23,, 297,6 9, 729 6, 6 7, 59 2,223 39, ,4 2,373,4 26, , , ,34 8,946 29,525 45, ,467 36, , 6 5, 97 22, 256 4, 7, , 37 29, 78,99, ,78 7, 7,736,632 7,9 8, 46 2, 92, 63, , 33,4,794 25,59 3,276 32, ,3 3,85 22, 42 38, 363 5, , 4 7, 723 4, , 58, 3 38, 528 8, 56,9.2 32, SOU 28, 438!,27,767 33, ^8,, ,228 j 35,2 47,24 43,4 72, 72, , 42, 5 7,4 4,.47 3,35 45,26 7, 355 5, 53 6,43 6,27,739 3,79 9, 3, 433, 5, , 8,,3 28,492 25, ,878 24,2 22, 35, 7 47, ,458 34, 25 2,, S 32,642 4,299 53, , 73 33,63,9,35 343, ,226 27,.9 52,56 8, 278 3, 35,9 9,42 8,553 5,4 5, 9,78 2, 7 2, 35 9,, 649 4, ,44,54,7 28, 5 7, , 352 5, 2,92 37, ,97 36,326 5, , 2, , 739 6,332 43, , 3 54, 687,37,7 354, , 3 222, , 6, 2.47,442 25, 285 8,,5 5, 645 5, , 33 22, 429 9,52 2,54 73, , 496,63,2 25, 54 3, 68 6, ,339 5, 722 5, 9 22, 37 54, 36,42 78,7 3,552 33, ,78 34, 46,5 4,252 3, , , 498 3, , , 2 56,29 5,326, ,8 4,7 8, 58, 733 5,942 6, 6,6 2, 22,46, 2 2,44 4, , 33,692,92 27, 4 8, ,5, 72 2, 273 3,258 55, 45, 23 7, 8 7,55 9, 3, 85 49, 9S, 9 3, , ,558 29,34 2,5 3, , 4 44, 7 54, 29 87, ,57 99, 32 8, 6,6 6,4 7, 635 2,67 4,8 2,3 3,9,9 4, ,79,4,998 3, 394, , 49 3, 58 6, 725 2,87 53, , , ,334 7, 8 69,733 7,3 8, ,945 9, 72, , , , , 64,52 23, 47 99, 5 8,636 7,32 7,49 2,77 4, 2, 3 2, 2,9 9, ,,3,45 3,47 3, 67, , 68 5,437 26, 922 8,29 49, 4, 923 7,4, 69 58, 8 58, 8 36, 26 4,69 6, , 5 45,87 72, , , 78 56, , 92, , 5,4 8, 7,492 6,7 6, 2,6 7, 4 25, 47, 59 2,78 IS, 9 3,,,5 3, 4 99, , 29, 72 2, 22, 6 53, , 3, 3 23, 53 64,69 35, 32 6,773,779 24, , 9, 5 77, 79 3, , , 5 79, , 8 8, 55 8, 523 7,9 6,949 6, 927 2,635 7, , 4 2,458 2,529, , 499 2,39,377 32, 567 4, ,5 3, 23, 3 3, 22 45, , 9 9,3 5, , 54 36, 25 5,64 4, 9, ,3 5, 38 45, ,9, 58, ,.43 26, 73 3,9 8, 785 8,9 8,478 8, 64 2,6 6, 8 26, 363 5, 298 2,359 34, , 5 2,6,59 Consumption, factory. thous. of lb._ 2, 54 76, 28, ,453 thous. of lb_. 39,96 3,46 396, 857 3, 4 Stock, end of quarter thous. of lb 364, 39,23 3, , 645 Gelatin, edible: thous. of lb._ 5,323 5, 597 5,6 3,7 Stocks, end of quarter.thous. of lb._ Greases :t 7,987 8,59 8,853 7, 37 Consumption, factory thous. of lb._ 52,2] 46, 46,6 53, 2 thous. of lb._ 68, 942 7,68, 28,39 Stocks, end of quarter thous. of lb._ 63, ,243 69, , 32 Lard compounds and substitutes:! thous. of lb 469, 6 333,2 349, 438, Stocks, end of quarter thous. of lb._ 39, 36,797 39,56 4, 69 * New series. For earlier data see p. 2 of the April issue (alcohol withdrawn tax paid), p. 2 of the April 3 issue (production of crude methanol). Latter series for production revised for 4 and. Revisions not shown above will be published in a subsequent issue.! Revised series, see p. 36 of the June 3 issue, for 2 revisions, exports and imports of fertilizer; for 3 revisions on exports see p. 29 of the 4 issue; for 4 revisions seep 9 of the issue; for revised data for crude methanol production for 3, see p. 36 of the May 4 issue. Quarterly data on fats and oils for the years 2 and 3 were shown on p. 9 of the March issue; for 4 on p. 9 of the issue. For revised series on explosives for period 92-3 see p. 9 of the 4 issue. A The refined equivalent of crude production is approximately percent. Texas only. Louisiana produced 23 percent of the United States production in 3, 6 percent in 4, and 23 percent in. f Figures since 922 revised due to dropping of Missouri from Southern States classification. See p. 9 of the 4 issue. # See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. Monthly revisions for 3 are shown on p. 2 of the 4 issue; for 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issue. 34,5 436,338 2, , 77 32, 34 22, 98 24,3 5,8 45 5,3 4,47 2, , 3 32,, 3 2,494 32, , 9 27, 378 8, 5 44,2 7.23, C 94, 3 57, 7 77, , 4 4,27 8,578,228

42 4 SUEVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey! March April May June July Aug.usi! Sept em - j ber OILS, FATS, AND BYPRODUCTS-Con Animal fats and byproducts and fish oils- Continued. Fish oils (quarterly):! Consumption, factory thous. of lb.. thous. of lb.. Stocks, end of quarter thous. of lb Vegetable oils and products: Vegetable oils, total: Consumption, factory (quarterly)! thous. of lb_. Exports.. thous. of lb.. Imports!^ -- thous. of lb._ (quarterly)! thous. of lb Stocks, end of quarter:! Crude thous. of lb_. Refined thous. of lb Copra and coconut oils: Copra: Consumption, factory (quarterly) short tons Imports^ - short tons Stocks end of quarter Coconut or copra oil: Consumption, factory: Crude (quarterly)! short tons thous. of lb_. Refined, total (quarterly)! thous. of lb.. In oleomargarine thous. of lb Imports# -thous. of lb.. (quarterly): Crude thous. of lb Refined thous of lb Stocks, end of quarter:! Crude thous of lb Refined thous. of lb Cottonseed and" products: Cottonseed:! Consumption (crush)..short tons.. Receipts at mills short tons Stock at mills, end of month short tons.. Cottonseed cake and meal: Exports! - short tons... short tons Stocks at mills, end of month short tons.. 9,68 "255,55 32,279 uottonseea on, cruae:* thous. of lb_. 222, 294 «227,7, 25 Stocks, end of month thous. of lb.. 2,398 «, 564 9,34 Cottonseed oil, refined: Consumption, factory (quarterly)! In oleomargarine. thous. of lb._ thous. of lb._ ~~,42 6,6 ~"~8,~ 549" Price, summer yellow, prime, N. Y. dol. per lb ! thous. of lb._ «64, , 26 Stocks, end of month thous. of lb._ 37, 369 «29,42 343,55 Flaxseed and products: Flaxseed: Imports, United States#.thous. of bu._,7,254 Minneapolis and Duluth: Receipts._ thous. of bu Shipments thous. of bu._ Stocks, end of month..thous. of bu._ Oil mills:! Consumption, quarterly thous of bu Stocks, end of quarter thous. of bu_. Price No., Minneapolis.dol. per bu.., crop estimate thous of bu Stocks, Argentina, end of month thous. of bu Linseed cake and meal: Exports thous of lb Shipments from Minneapolis thous. of lb_. T inqaori nil* L/inseeu on. Consumption, factory (quarterly)! thous. of lb Price, wholesale, N. Y dol. per lb" (quarterly)! thous. of lb.. Shipments from Minn thous. of lb Stocks at factory, end of quarter thnnq f\f IVi LilULXo. Ul IU Oleomargarine: Consumption (tax-paid withdrawals) thous. of lb_. Price, standard, uncolored, Chicago dol. per lb_. thous. of lb._ Vegetable shortenings:** Price, tierces, Chicago dol. per lb.. CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS Continued , ,85 " 3," 69 23, 5 8,26.78,322,2, , , e 6 8 3,7 37,5, ,6 35, , " 87, 8 27,433 "~6, 372* 3,55 "2, 528,8, «9, 2 2, "34, 724 3,,299 3, ,543 37,43 22, ""l3732~ "*6,"854" 32, , " 79,9 32,9 "I572~ 2, ,326 6, 6,,43 287, 3 2,2 2, ,559 4,9 9, , , , 328 7,78 22,7,4, ,354, 7 632, 7 477,563,737 22,873 4,39 35,73 5,252 5,24 45,22,59,6 27,94 23,992 58,673,299 9, 43,3 23, , ,2 3,3 36, 3 9,2.7 39,38 4,2, , ,27. '4,23,969 59,2 22, ,569 4,9 46, ,.45 33, 56 "' 526" 94,6 3, 297 7,946 23, ,6 244,44 636, 27, , 2 35, 3 28,8 8," 6 "~I6~7~. 26, , , ,5 39,399 2, 7. 8, 37, , ,68.25 I. 22 j.8 _ 24,5 27,8 37,972 35,64 85,646 37,85 2,567 63, ,2 7,792 26, ,79 4,, ,64 L 4,33 36,225 5,244 37, , 5,8 45,364 25,2 854,5 6,3 77,37 3,42 5,446 56,394 4, 976 3,92 37,53 99,594 3, 2 22, ,4 87,2 29,49 7, , 8,564 2, , , 8 8,55 3,43 24,69 8,78.94,5 54,33, ,246 7,94 2, ,35 42, 379 2, 8,5..98 _ 32,37 " "77853", 2 87,4 32, , " 7, 7 6,97 "27334" 4,336 33,6 3, 67 98, ,599 22,429 43,37 85, 26 """8,"347" " 7,36 * Revised. estimate. / estimate. For earlier data on vegetable shortening price, see p. 8 of the 4 issue.,!revised series: Monthly data on cottonseed and cottonseed products for the year ended July 2 were shown on p. 2 of the 3 issue; revisions for each month of 3 were shown when monthly data for 4 became available; revisions for year 4 were shown on p. 38 of the 4 issue and for year ended July on p 2 of the issue. For exports of cottonseed cake and meal for the year 2, see p. 37 of the June 3 issue. Data revised for 3, see p. 9 of the 4 issue; for 4 revisions, see p. 9 of the issue. For revised data on imports of vegetable oils for 2, see p. 7 of the June 3 issue; for 3, p. 2, of the 4 issue; and for 4, p. 2, of the issue. Quarterly data on fats and oils for the years 2 and S33 were shown on p. 9 of the March issue; for 4 on p. 9 of the issue. Digitized for FRASER #See footnote on p. 37 of the 4 issue. Data revised for 3; see p 2 of the 4 issue; for 4 revisions, see p. 2 of the issue. This series prior to was listed as "Lard Compound.".94,9 7,536, ,299 33, ,. ""9,"372" 32, , " 87,928 ::::::,98 ""9,979 32, 569 7,992 23, 9 5, ,9, , 3,. 4,6 46, 727, ,6 27,7 5, _ 3, 26, , , 334 2,6 47, 7 6, 245,455 4, 555 8,6 492, ,449,636 6, 6 4, 35,94 9,736 4, 72, 49, 9 29,4 6, 42, , 34, ,4 8, 6 4, 36,47 263, 52 6, , 25, ,68 2, ,96 25, 794 5,4,29.,9 2, 2 4, 6 22, , ,853 7, 46 9,554 33,5 32, 253 5,94 7, 7 5 8, 55 68,,344 8, 77 7,.98 29,476 39, ,299 2, 469 2,. 7,273 26, , It, 6 4, 7 "il.9" 4, 273 2, , 4 68, , 7 45, 56 29, , 547 7,68. 22, , 22 67, ,96 24,4,3.3 5,6 3, , ,, 2 55,492 7S,7 3, 429 4, 5 55,63 2; 572 4Q ,8 69,46,6 3,964 5, 6 63,4, ,2 4,24 592,,258, 8, ,73 26,4 76,256 92, 7 332,26 9,8.2 92, , 764, ,87? 2.4 5, 52 32, 58 3,25 79,. 9,98 3,538 98,4 34, ,7. 25

43 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 4 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April May June July August CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS Continued PAINTS Paints, varnish, lacquer, and filler products:! Total sales. thous. of dol.. Classified. thous. of dol.. Industrial thous. of dol._ Trade thous. of dol._ Unclassified (235 estab.)..thous. of dol. Plastic, cold-water paints, and calcimines: Sales: Calcimines dollars.. Plastic paints dollars.. Cold-water paints dollars.. CELLULOSE PLASTIC PRODUCTS 34,49 23,92,8 2,564, , 4,672 38, 32,853 22,32 9,59 2,63, ,36 34,44 5, 36 25,427 7,856 8,87 7, 22,87 3, 76 77,7 2, 39 4, 27 7,56 6,7 5,768 25, 543 2,468 72,98 23, , 8,67 7,4 28,6 3, 292, 73 2,8 4, 363 7, 7,2 5, 99, 27,734 76,97 29, 92 2, 728 9,2, 446 9,85 2, 6 44,52 34, 36, 29 25,99,2 4,78, 3,3 47, 47 47,6 4, 28,26, 6 7, 28 2,924 36, 356 5,8, 38, ,587,7 5, 792 2,49 36,6 54, 87 58,285 33,99 23,3, 287 3,6, ,4 49, 3 39,5 33,38 22,338 9, 3, 243,4 297,878 5, , 5 33, 45 22, 338 9,564 2, 7,2 292, 7 47, , 333 Nitro-cellulose:* Sheets, rods, and tubes: Shipments C ellulose-acetate : Sheets, rods, and tubes: Shipments ROOFING thous. of lb_. thous. of lb._ thous. of lb_. thous. of lb,6,36,,598,299,239,298,42.2,4,469, ,23,252 4,322, ,224,239,3,39,22.97,345,2 92,54,26,6 85,225,98,2 6,463,5,,468,787,532,24,27 Dry roofing felt:. _ short tons.. Stocks, end of month short tons.. Prepared roofing shipments:^ Total thous. squares.. Grit roll thous. squares.. Shingles (all types) thous. squares Smooth roll..thous. squares.. 25,97 5,853 24, 76 6,9 3,8 85 9,46 6,85 7,577, , 78 8,5, , 2 8, , 33 7,92 3,39 5,94 22, 528 7,999 2, , 25 23, 73 7, 2, ,223 22,39 8,63 2, ,6,479 2, , 29, 5 2, , 2,3 9,55 2, , 33 23, 7,523 4,2,8,2,9 ELECTRIC POWER AND GAS ELECTRIC POWER, totalt mills, of kw.-hr.. By source: Fuelsf mills, of kw.-hr._ Water powerf mills, of kw.-hr_. By type of producer: Central stations! mills, of kw.-hr_. Street railways, manufacturing plants, etc mills, of kw.-hr.. dales of electrical energy: Sales to ultimate consumers, total (Edison Elec. Inst.)... mills, of kw.-hr.. Domestic service mills, of kw.-hr._ Commercial retail mills, of kw.-hr. Commercial wholesale-mills, of kw.-hr Municipal street lighting mills, of kw.-hr. Railroads: Electrified steam mills, of kw.-hr_. Street and interurban.mills. of kw.-hr.. Revenues from ultimate consumers (Edison Elec. Inst.) thous. of dol GAS,43 6,9 3, ,7 5,9 2,872 8,36 6,3,,22 3, , 7 5,432 3,258 8,29 6,927,2,2 3, ,339 9,39 5,85 3,2 8,5 55 I 7,29,368,36 3, ,246 5, 3,3 8,7 7,278,4,43 3, ,459 79,4 8,599 5,68 2,98 8,8,34,324 3, ,22 8,94 5,4 3,79 8,423 6,,254,256 3, , 8,2 4,878 4,4 8,47 4 7,69,223,28 3,2 3, 73 9,85 5,63 3,923 8,64 7,85,,2 3, ,5 9,24 5,853 3,27 8, ,264,44,2 4, , 7 9,672 6,529 3,43 9, 56 7,59,59,37 4, ,672» 9,» 6, 737»3,» 9, ,723,8,36 4, , 636 9, 7 «6,6 3,26 9, 544 7,9,26,42 4, , 597 Manufactured gas:*f Customers, total thousands. Domestic thousands House heating thousands. Industrial and commercial..thousands. Sales to consumers millions of cu. ft. Domestic millions of cu. ft. House heating millions of cu. ft. Industrial and commercial millions of cu. ft. Revenue from sales to consumers thous. of dol_ Domestic thous. of dol. House heating thous. of dol. Industrial and commercial.thous. of dol Natural gas:*f Customers, total thousands.. Domestic thousands.. Industrial and commercial..thousands.. Sales to consumers millions of cu. ft. Domestic- millions of cu. it- Industrial and commercial millions of cu. ft- Revenues from sales to consumers thous. of dol_. Domestic thous. of dol. Industrial and commercial.thous. of dol,33 9, ,7 2,8,57 8,34 3,3 24,697,5 5,7 5,947 5, ,28 8,556,252 25,85 3,677,8 9,994 9, ,64 8,543 3,223 8,26 3,38 23,46,9 5,92 6,8 5, , 26, 726 7,69 32,99 8, ,5 9, , 8,679 5,76 8, 33,3 23,336 3,29 6,244 6,39 5, , 36,325,68 38,5 23,635 4,98 9,96 9, ,96 9,922 9,43 34,555 23,8 4,3 6,4 5,987 5, ,778 43, 78,98 44,32 27,964 6,78 9,972 9, ,6 2,46 7,53 9,9 34,3 23,322 4, 6,57 6,4 5, ,242 5,3,673,6 3,58 7,296 9,973 9, ,29 9,29 5,2 9,422 32,7 22,2 3,54 6,49 6,33 5, ,3 38, ,442 39, ,7 4,6, 9, ,8 8, 78 4,223 9,7 32, 22, 5 2,585 6,476 6,27 5, , 3,859 72, 77 35, 4 2, 34 4, 29,98 9, ,334 8,8 2,85 9,4 3,9 23,,553 6,336 6,33 5, ,639 23,8 67,5 29,25 6,429 2,635, 8 9, , 53 8,94,32 9,42 3, , ,27 6, 5, ,4 6,854 67,37 24, 2, 73,98,6 9, , 249 7, ,56 28, 6 22, ,9 6, 5,5 422, 696 3, ,2 22, 94,,3,9 9, ,723 6, ,6 27, 223 2, 42 5,8 6,37 5, ,33 2, 678 7,42 22, 778,353 2, 2 «Revised. * New series. For earlier data see p. 9 of the May issue, manufactured and natural gas. Series on cellulose products prior to 3 not available. ^ Revised series. Data revised beginning with 2; see p. 39 of the April issue. Revisions for period 2 to Januarv 4 inclusive will be shown in a subsequent issue. f For revised data for electric-power production for 2 see pp. 38 and 56 of the May 3 issue; for 3 see p. 38 of the May 4 issue; 4 and data also revised. Revisions not shown in the June issue and in the May issue will appear in a subsequent number. Manufactured and natural gas statistics for the years have been revised. Revised data on manufactured gas appeared on p. 2 of the June issue, and revised data for the natural gas on p. 9 of the August issue For revised data on paint, varnish and lacquer products for the years on "total" for and "unclassified" for years 2-35 see p. 2 of the issue Digitized for FRASER

44 Digitized for FRASER 42 SUKVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Decein ber FOODSTUFFS AND TOBACCO March April May June July August BEVERAGES Fermented malt liquors:* Consumption (tax-paid withdrawals) thous. of bbl thous. of bbl Stocks, end of month thous. of bbl Distilled spirits:* Consumption (tax-paid withdrawals)!* thous. of proof gal. Whisky. -thous. of proof gal.., total thous. of proof gal. Whisky thous. of proof gal. Stocks, end of month..thous. of proof gal. Whisky thous. of proof gal. Rectified spirits: Alcohol, ethyl, withdrawn tax paid (see p. 39): Consumption (tax-paid withdrawals)* thous. of proof gal. DAIRY PRODUCTS Butter: Consumption, apparent*! thous. oflb. Price, N. Y., wholesale (92-score) dol. per lb._ (factory)! thous. of lb_. Receipts, 5 markets thous. of lb_. Stocks, cold storage, creamery, end of month _ thous. oflb. Cheese: Consumption, apparent! thous. of lb._ Imports# thous. oflb.. Price, no. Amer. N. Y dol. per lb_- (factory)! thous. oflb-. American whole milk! thous. of lb_. Receipts, 5 markets thous. oflb Stocks. cold storage, end of month! thous. oflb- American whole milk! thous. of lb Milk: Condensed and evaporated: :! Condensed (sweetened)..thous. oflb Evaporated (unsweetened)! thous. of lb Exports: Condensed (sweetened)..thous. oflb Evaporated (unsweetened) thous. of lb Prices, wholesale, N. Y.: Condensed (sweetened).dol. per case- Evaporated (unsweetened) dol. per case.. Stocks, manufacturers, end of month : Condensed (sweetened): Bulk goods thous. oflb Case goods thous. oflb.. Evaporated (unsweetened): Case goods thous. of lb Fluid milk: Consumption in oleomargarine thous. oflb.., Minn, and St. Paul thous. of lb Receipts: Boston, incl. cream Greater New York* Powdered milk: Exports Orders, net, new Stocks, mfrs. end of mo thous. of qt thous. of qt_. thous. of lb thous. oflb.. thous. of lb FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 4,249 4,97 7,722 9,724 8,22 27, 5 2, , , 639 4,.33 35,4 47, 22 5,39 5,6.9 57,738 44,9 3, 3 8,98 2, 9 8, 35,, ,, 6 25, 6,732 27, , 76 3,3 3, 79 3,735 6,496 7,87 7,76 23, 2 6, 549, 796, 423 2,64, , 8 42,49 2, 2 63, 6,5.7 63,58 42,4 6,6,73,67 5,55 5, 7 2 2, ,497 4, , 6,56 23, 7, 768 9, , ,3 3, ,45 8, , 8,3 25, 3 97,7 2,969 44, , 4 32,8 7, 9 52, 9 5,.8, 6 28,8 5, 423 4, 92, 92 4,578, , ,373,697 9,25 6,787 22, 738 7,6 5, , 254 4, 58 3,4 3,29 6, 25 8,29 7, 35 24,42 9,9 25,58 27,54 2,998 37, ,47 35, 734 4,7 46, 7 3, ,38 27, 34, 4 99,572, 537 7,, , , 8, ,2 28,22 6, 2 9, , 4,2 2, 679 3,335 6,64 6,9 5,42 2,9 2, 34 23, , 2,34 27, ,72 42, 257 2, 52 54, 879 3, , 29, 455,46 9, 78,97 9, 3 8,3 47, ,5 6.44,94 7,396 3, 578 6, 38,8 35, 2 9,22 2,685 2,2 6, 6,73 5,687 9, 8, 8 242, 233,797 2,28 22,4.37 6,6S8 4,2 8,27 53, 3, , 27,5 3,339 79, ,363 2, 254 2, 257 2,79 4, , 329 3, 9 45, 3 7,555 3,99 5,38 4, , 72 8,5 3,738 4,433 7,333 6,23 5,53 22, 69 2, 258, 22 2, 946 2,335 23, , 45,9 5, , ,37 32, 49 5,64 73,2, 26 23, , , , 2,963 42, 597 6,2 35, 5 5, 2 4, ,36 9,435 3, 7 4,97 8,28 6,77 5,39 23, 25 2, , , 3 2,367 3,6.3 3, 928 io, '67V 4, , 27.5,8 37, 6, Mb 67, , 6 22, 4 8, , ,5 3, 6, 7 6,529 36, 39 5, 694, ,778, , 8,49 5,6 4,76 23, ,739 28, 28 2,44, ,28 56, 537 2,57 7, 3,52.5, ,3 4, 26 7,7 56, , 4 2, , , 3 8,252 4,7 5,29 4,673 7, 387 2, ,7 2, , 6 8,633 5,229 4,2 24, 2 22, 6 3, 7 3,3,7 32, ,223 69, , 76, 5 4, 257 '.7,32 67, 2,9 85, 798 7, 2 33, 537 2,99 4, , 4,2, 359 5, 52 42, 5 lfi, 55 4, G «6, 4)2 32, 7 6,67 6, 79 8,' 525 5,3 4, 643 2! 72 9, , 99 35,6 2,59 22,.34 52, 54, 676 3, 259 6C, 37 5, , , 32 8,479 97, 43 8, , 339 2,299, , 4 ll!8s 99, (>3 5, 2.5t* 32, IK; 8, 4: 7, C V 'A 7,38! 29, 264 5,8 5, 77 8, 22 5, 2 4,279 9, 763 7,4 339, 328,,6 3, , 792 2,6 53, 7 6, , 6 44, 45 5, 98 7, 542 9, 47 9, 2, , US ll! 6 2, 2,", 7 28, <J8 7, 78 l if., oc,o 32 6,."2 24. Slit 4,'.>v 5, 8."-: 6, 5, 2 23, 698 9, , , 7* ,8 44, 637 «8, S3.' 53, 33 5, 79f.2 55, 3 43, S 4, W. «98. 2i Apples:, crop estimate thous. of bu "8,3 /67,2 Shipments car lot! carloads 5, 692 8,6 7,546 5,378 4, 6,2 5,44 4,563 2,28 3, 373 UT4 7, Stocks, cold storage, end of month thous. of bbl... 8,377, 276,8 9,6 8,225 5,976 3,769,7 8 «2. 4SC Citrus fruit, car-lot shipments! carloads.. 8,9 8,9,53 4, 45 3, 26 3,56 5,6 4, 8 3, Onions, car-lot shipments! carloads.. 3,5 3,4 2,392,58 2,592 2,5,8 3,645 3,858 3,64,8,479 3, 363 Potatoes: Price, white, N. Y dol. per lb , crop estimate _ thous. of bu 332, 244 '387,678 Shipments, car lot! carloads.. 22, 458 9,49 3, 854,356 6, 8 9, 56 24, 3 8, 78 7,4 8, 598 4, 425 2,37 lfi, 724 a Revised. Bulk evaporated milk not included since. «Nov. estimate. / Dec. estimate. New series. Beverage figures are compiledby theu. S. Treasury, Alcohol Tax Unit. Monthly data on distilled spirits available beginning July 3 and on fermented malt liquors, April 3. For earlier data for receipts of milk in Greater New York see p. 2 of the August 4 issue. See p. 9 of the June 3 issue for butter consumption. Data on consumption of rectified spirits are as indicated by the sale of stamps. Data prior to April 3 not published. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. Data for 3 also revised, see p. 2 of the 4 issue. For 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issue.!revised series. For revisions refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues, as follows: For on apparent consumption of cheese, production of total and American whole-milk cheese, and production of condensed and evaporated milk, p. 2, 3. For earler data on stocks (cold-storage holdings) of total and American whole-milk cheese, p. 9, April 3. For 2 revised data on production of factory and American whole-milk cheese, production of condensed and evaporated milk, p. 39, 3. For subsequent revisions for 2 on production of evaporated milk, see p. 39, 3. For 2 and 3 revisions on butter and cheese consum p- tion and 3 revisions on production of butter, cheese, condensed and evaporated milk, see p. 9 of the March issue. For 4 revisions on production of butter, cheese, condensed and evaporated milk, and apparent consumption of butter and cheese see p. 9 of the issue, and revisions not shown in the issue for will appear in a subsequent issue. Forfinalrevision for 3, car-lot shipments of apples, citrus fruits, onions, and potatoes, see p. 2, issue, and for 4 revisionssee p. 2 of the issue. Data on consumption of distilled spirits revised to include brandy tax paid direct from fruit distilleries. For revisions see p. 39 of the March issue. Consumption of distilled spirits (withdrawn tax paid) plus brandy tax paid direct from fruit distillers plus ethyl alcohol withdrawn tax paid (see p. 39) equals Bureau of Internal Revenue total of distilled spirits withdrawn tax paid. 2l\ 44S ls5;7k 2U4 2. i-' X, 4( VI. iol' "Hi" ~( ;l * fi. 3." 7 Tiiucn >' i 2 Wti L'f., 7i,r

45 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 43 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April j May June July August Septein-! ber FOODSTUFFS AND TOBACCO Continued GRAIN AND PRODUCTS E xports, principal grains, including flour and mealf thous. of bu_. Barley: Exports, including maltf thous. of bu_- Price, no. 2, Minn.: Straight* dol. per bu_. Malting* _.dol. per bu._, crop estimate.--thous. of bu_. Receipts, principal markets*-thous. of bu Visible supply, end of month* thous. of bu_. Corn: Exports, including mealf thous. of bu_- Grindings thous. of bu_. Prices, wholesale: No. 3, yellow (Kansas City)-dol. per bu._ No. 3, white (Chicago) dol. per bu, crop estimate thous. of bu_. Receipts, principal markets thous. of bu._ Shipments, principal markets thous. of bu._ Visible supply, end of month* thous. of bu_. Oats: Exports, including oatmealf.thous. of bu_- Price, no, 3, white (Chicago)--dol. per bu.~, crop estimate..-thous. of bu_. Receipts, principal markets- thous of bu-~ Visible supply, end of month* thous. of bu.. Rice: Exportsf pockets lb Imports# pockets b._ Price, wholesale, head, clean, New Orleans dol. per lb_., crop estimate.-..thous. of bu_. Southern States (La., Tex., Ark., and Tenn.): Receipts, rough rice, at mills thous. of bbl. (b.)-. Shipments from mills (milled rice) total' thous. of pockets ( lb.) Stocks, domestic, rough and cleaned (in terms of cleaned rice) end of month thous. of pockets ( lb.)_. Rye: Exports, including flour thous. of bu_. Price, no. 2, Minneapolis dol. per bu.., crop estimate thous. of bu._ Receipts, principal markets*.thous. of bu._ Visible supply, end of month* thous. of bu_- Wheat: Exports:f Wheat., including flour thous. of bu_. Wheat only thous. of bu._ Prices, wholesale: No. Dark Northern Spring, Minn.* dol. per bu_. No. 2 Red Winter, St. Louis dol. per bu.- No. 2 Hard Winter, K. C.dol. per bu_- Weighted average 6 markets, all grades dol. per bu_-, crop estimate, total thous. of bu_. Spring wheat thous. of bu Winter wheat thous. of bu_. Receipts thous. of bu_. Shipments _..thous. of bu_. Stocks, visible supply, world-thous. of bu Canada thous. of bu_. United States* thous. of bu. Stocks, held by mills (quarterly) thous. of bu. W heat flour: Consumption (computed) f.thous. of bbl. Exports t - thous.of bbl_- Grinding of wheat thous. of bu.- Prices, wholesale: Standard Patents, Minn_._dol. per bbl. Winter, straights, Kansas City dol. per bbl : Flour, actual (Census) thous. of bbl. Flour prorated, total (Russell's)f thous. of bbl.. Oflal..thous. of lb- Operations, percent of total capacity Stocks, total, end of month (computed) thous. of bbl Held by mills (quarterly) thous of bbl 3, M43,96 9,5 7,496 64»5, 4.2.,526,7 8,797 4,58 3,.42 7, 3,569 47, 7, 534 2,.39 45,4 2,2,23 2, ,,3 6,29 2, a 7, 233 *8,36 =59, 97 5, 237 3, , , ,2 9, 9,2 54 2,777, ,923 6, , ,544 3, 2, 5.3 2, 45,3, 2,2.4 2,42,224,99.52, ,3 4,6 443,4 259,9,46, , ,7,6, ,6 2, ,7 6, , ,879 7,256 4,4.29 6,2 46, , 68 9, 769.4, 2, ,, ,5 2,43 436, ,424 8,37, , ,2 9, 692, ,6 2,, ,226 4, 5,4 32 6, (') 2,29,9 8, 729 7, ,4 42,2 9, , 4.4 / 38, ,36.49 /58,928,69 9,22, /3,444 '59,24 '464,23 9,943 7,8 4, 259,928, 73 39, 7 7, , , 8,349 5, ,592 4,222 2, ,24 6,356. ) 4,4 8,33 6, 7.3 5,2 4,23 5,59 27,9.39 5,9 3,44.53 ",6 8,42, , ,9 243,63 68, 9, , ,644 9,3 728, ,4, , 6 3, , , 64 7,494 5, , ,5 2, , IS, 3 7, 7,5 4,45 I S, 768 4,23 37,6 29,792 73,9.39 4,7 2, """763" 7,642, ,4 6,7 427, 223,725 58,64 9, , ,4 9,7 79,5 56 5,2 6,9 79, , "I," 324' 7,555, ,2 38,9 26,3 49, 537,97 9, , , ,7 5 4, 4,68, ,9, , , 497 8,58 8, ,99 35, 4 4,24 6, ,244.5 """976" 7,76, ,47 7,5 335, 34,25 4, 4 8, , , 8,235 6, 223 5, 2, ,5,24 9 6, , 227, 32 6, ,8 3, 2 9,3 76, ,52 "2,"297" 6,9, ,3 2,97 2,97 6,7 32,73 8, , ,49,92 4, 2, ,8 9, , , 25 5,94 7, ,2 3, , '" I-422" 6,379, , 2, ,2 4, ,25, 642 7, , ,5 8,3 6,94 5,6 4,255 2, ,992 7,7 6 «6, , 64,926 4, , 39, 253 >, ! ~,"636" 6,8, , , 2 2,3 6,49 72, 7, , ,46, 244 7, , 5 3,442, , 5 2,36 6, , 569 7,7 4, , 25 5, 6,24 4, j.! ",-546" 6, 6, ,4 8, 24 2, 97 3, 276,764, , ,,2 8,322 < 56 5,6 4,4, ,6 5, , ,23 4,3 4, ,7 5, 452, , 67.42, I, 8 C, 376 2, ,, 8 35,76 49,98 8,92 53, 52 4 "4, «8, 78 9, 723, «6, 5 4,677 "Revised. Nov. estimate. / Dec. estimate. No quotation. «Brewer's rice not included. New series. For earlier data, see p. 2 of the 2 issue, rye and barley receipts and rye stocks; and p. 2 of the June issue, wholesale price of wheat, No. Dark Northern Spring, Minneapolis. Since the division of no. 2 barley by the Department of Agriculture into straight and malting grades as of July,4, prices for each grade have been reported separately. fdata revised. For revisions of w T heat flour, production and consumption (Russell's) from July to 2, see p. 9 of the August 3 issue. For revised data on exports for 2 see p. 39 of the June 3 issue for 3, p. 2 of the 4 issue, and for 4, p. 9 of the issue. Represents the visible supply east of the Rocky Mountains as reported by Dun & Bradstreet. #fiee footnote on p. 37 of this issue Data for 3 also revised, see p. 2 of the 4 issue, and for 4, revisions p. 2 of the issue. Digitized for FRASER p Includes domestic shipments only. Corn ground for export will be reported at the end of each quarter.

46 Digitized for FRASER 44 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April May June July August LIVESTOCK AND MEATS Total meats: Consumption, apparenta mills, of lb_. (inspected slaughter) A mills, of lb..,2 Stocks, cold storage, end of month, totala mills, of lb_. 635 Miscellaneous meats mills, of lb 77 Cattle and beef: Beef and veal: Consumption, apparenta--thous. of lb Exportsf thous. of Ib,536 Price, wholesale: Beef, fresh native steers, Chicago dol. per lb...5 (inspected slaughter) A thous. of lb.. 5, Stocks, cold storage, end of month A thous. of lb.. 4, 68 Cattle and calves: Movement, primary markets:* Receipts thous. of animals.. 2,439 Slaughter, local thous. of animals..,368 Slaughter, inspected. (See Leather and leather products.) Shipments, total thous. of animals..,6 Stocker and feeder.thous. of animals.. 56 Price, wholesale, cattle, corn-fed, Chicago dol. per lb 9.9 Hogs and products: Hogs: Movement, primary markets: Receipts thous. of animals.. 2,63 Slaughter, local thous. of animals..,7 Slaughter, inspected. (See Leather and leather products.) Shipments, total..-thous. of animals.. Stocker and feeder.thous. of animals.. Price, heavy, Chicago..-dol. per lb... Pork, including lard: Consumption, apparenta--thous. of lb._ Exports totalf thous. of lb.. "" 4," 7 Lardf. thous. of Ib_.,454 Prices: Hams, smoked, Chicago.-dol. per lb Lard: Prime contract, N. Y...dol. per lb._. 7 Refined, Chicago* dol. perlb...25, inspected slaughter, totala thous. of lb LardA thous. of Ib_. Stocks, cold storage, end of mo. thous. of lb.. Fresh and cureda thous. of lb.. LardA thous. of lb Sheep and lambs: Lamb and mutton: Consumption, apparenta--thous. of lb_., inspected slaughtera thous. of lb.. Stocks, cold storage, end of mo. thous. of lb.. Movement, primary markets:* Receipts thous. of animals.. Slaughter, local thous. of animals.. Slaughter, inspected. (See Leather and leather products.) Shipments, total thous. of animals.. Stocker and feeder.thous. of animals.. Prices, wholesale: Ewes, Chicago dol. per b.. Lambs, Chicago dol. per b.. Poultry and eggs: Eggs: Receipts, 5 markets thous. of cases.. Stocks, cold storage, end of month: Case thous. of cases.. Frozen thous. of lb.. Poultry: Receipts, 5 markets thous. of lb- Stocks, cold storage, end of mo. thous. of lb_. TEOPICAL PRODUCTS FOODSTUFFS AND TOBACCO Continued 546, 97 8, ,5 352, 26 94, 4 67,4 5,925 2,87,9, ,79, 34, 434 5,78, , 738, , 57, 464 2,545,35,98 9.4, 2, , 7,425 2, ,2 47, 8 28,3 24,3 4, 72 69,367 69,,968 3,55,225, ,644,8 28,332 53, , 94,4. 492, 498 9,64 2,37, ,67, ,55 4,872 7, ,8 58,72 29,5 253, 29 37,96 54,9 55,72 2,, ,738 79,35,4,98 94, , ,4 6, 2,, ,36, ,269 2,2 7, , 25, 2 379,4 326, ,78 54,7 55,235 3,25, ,546 56,32 7,3,9, , , 46 4,447,7, , 532, ,56 4, 929, , 96, 392 5,7 436,42, 9 64,298 64,4 2,4,8, ,722 2,433 3, , ,42, 928, ,87, ,7, 268 7, ,346,464 53,43 45, 78, ,6 54,9 2,563, ,367 5,4 85, ,, ,99 79, 59, 5, ,45, ,4 6, 43, , 787,58 526, ,49 76, 58,477 58,285 2,334,7, , ,8 5,98 69, ,36, ,49,,673, ,8, ,876 4,8 9, ,29 77, 24 54, 7 457, 42, 52,394 5,87,785, ,22 3,39 69,72 5,22 49, ,8, ,27 5,34,522, ,9, ,6 8,4, ,73 8, , 2 44, 68 99, 6 47,25 46, 72,2,944 9, , 5,77 94,4 8,979 4,926,36, , 8,.33 5, 58 4, 222,764, ,4, , 492 8,, , 87, 2 54, ,3 6, 7,7 47,97,22, ).38,727 7,58,725 22, 43,5,4, 6 523, 5, , 4 42, 94,, ,, ,78 6,8 7, , 6, 2 558, ,96 7, 26 49,457 49, 3,478 2,22,6,4 52 ) 9.6,247 7,335 5, 5 22,6 49, 22, ,398, , , 255 2,26, ,7, ,25 2, 224 6, ,98 64,3 53, 49 42, 8,56 5,85 52, 2,634 2,287,, ,6 8, 64 26,4,4,, ,678, , 787 «, 2,264, ,9, ,96 2, 7, , 37 59, 7 «463, 44 a 36, 68 ", 796 6, 4 a 3, 3 2,7,26, ,87 96, Cocoa: Imports! long tons.. 23,2 9,3 9,5 24,357 3,58 32,6 28,549 3,26 9,696 7, 5, 57 8,29 22, Price, spot, Accra, N. Y dol. perlb Shipments, Gold Coast and Nigeria long tons.. 28, 23, , 7 54, 6, , 4,4 7,25,63 4,33 2, 7 2,58 7,24 a Revised. AGovernment slaughter not included; for months June 4- see p. 44 of the June issue. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. Data revised for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue, for 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issue. ffor revisions of exports for 2, see p. 4 of the June 3 issue. For revised data for 3 on all export data, see p. 2 of the 4 issue, for 4 see p. 9 of the issue. New series. See p. 8 of 4 issue. Included animals purchased for Federal Relief Corporation for the months of 4- inclusive. ino quotation. 27, 58 «,96

47 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 45 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey FOODSTUFFS AND TOBACCO Continued March April May June July August TROPICAL PRODUCTS-Continued Coffee: Clearances from Brazil, total thous. of bags.. To United States thous. of bags.. Imports into United States# thous. of bags.. Price, Rio No. 7, N. Y _dol. per lb Receipts at ports, Brazil._.thous. of bags.. Stocks, world total, incl., interior of Brazil thous. of bags.. Visible supply, total excl. interior of Brazil....thous. of bags.. United States thous. of bags.. Sugar: Raw sugar: Cuba: Stocks, total, end of month thous. of long tons.. United States: Meltings, 8 portsf -long tons.. Price, wholesale, 96 centrifugal, New York Receipts: From Hawaii and Puerto Rico dol. per lb.. long tons.. Importsf# -long tons.. Stocks at refineries, end of mo.f long tons.. Refined sugar: Exports, including maplef long tons.. Price, retail, gran., N. Y dol. per lb_. Price, wholesale, gran., N. Y.dol. per lb.. Receipts: From Hawaii and Puerto Rico* long tons.. Imports: Cuba* A long tons.. Philippine Islands* long tons.. Shipments, 2 portsf long tons.. Stocks, end of month, 2 ports f. long tons.. Tea: Imports*? -thous. of lb.. Price, wholesale, Formosa, fine, N. Y. dol. perlb.. MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS Candy sales by manufacturers.thous. of dol.. Fish: Landings, fresh fish, principal ports thous. of lb.. Salmon, canned, shipments cases.. Stocks, total, cold storage, 5th of monthf thous. of lb_. TOBACCO Leaf: Exportsf. _ thous. of lb.. Imports, unmanufactured??.,.thous. oflb.., crop estimate thous. of lb_. N (^- Stocks, total, including imported types (quarterly).mills oflb.. Flue-cured, fire-cured, and air-cured mills, oflb.. Cigar types.. mills, of lb_. Manufactured products: Consumption (tax-paid withdrawals): Small cigarettes....millions.. Large cigars thousands- Manufactured tobacco and snuff thous. of lb.. Exports, cigarettes thousands.. Prices, wholesale: Cigarettes.. dol. per,.. Cigars dol. per..., ,24 ) 7, ,.34 7, 9, , 2 7, ,872 2, 735,2 3, 63, 238 6,29,,637 3, 24 55,4 32, , , 879, , 27, , , , , 24, , 64, , 96 54,4 37,639 3,543 4, !, ,943 9, 9, ,87 42, 7 4,5 7,56 8,47 2,7 524,399 3,96 324, , ,42 2,298 34,26 5,2 7,7.2 27,3 33,368 47,4 76, 53 67, 7 4,3,8 457,299 26, 687 3, ,4 4,299.,539 29,5 7, , 73 38,4 2,23 4, ,636 9,352 8, ,7 26, ,, 56 42,6 3,78,296,8 2,373, 563 4,2.,49 ) 7, ,58 32,, , 32,9 23,96 337, , , 5 78,7 4, ,58 26,987 57,64 3,34 6, ,5 2,2 49, ,3 4,929 8,43 2, ,579 29,49 385, ,36 854,5.68,496 ( 7,6,,2 692,45.,444 3, 8,6,56,8,99 33, ,7 35,64 228,4, ,2 28, 77 2,92 58, 3, 23 5,.2 23,92 2,6 436,976 45,29 35,37 5,726, 7 356, 4 27, 99 32, , , 3 279,852 24, 9 4, , 23 42,877 9,37,722,8 8, ,23 39, , 79 3, 27 3,877 4,553 2,42,949 3, 377,67 3,35 35, FUELS AND BYPRODUCTS,94 549,38.63,27 29, 8,28 i 9 2,92 46, ,39 325,379 3,5 3, ,924 37,9 4, 5 43,725 9, 6, ,399, ,9 ) 8,8,6 326, ,7 2,287 4, 9 3, ,99 4, 8 4, 5, , 73 42,56 43, ,242 54, 4 26,2 24,235 5,3,9 4, 29, , ,4 8,5 4,2 2,25 49,369 28, 398, ,9 8,,5,5 46, ,6 35, 7 42,96 3, , , 53 2, 5,72.2 2, , , 2 46, 24 2, 477 5,85 «2,, 77 "372 4,9 452, 32 29,4 3,28, ,5 ) 8,3,3 37, , 268, ,22 4, ,6 3, 25 5,8 5, , 64 44,35 5, 7, 578 2,7 5,7 4, 8 4,4 3,326 38,53, 9 94.,6 ( 7,4 9, 29 37, ,968 3, , 794 5, , 7, 2,8 6,32.2 7, 63 45, 39,,52 76, 98 26, 946 5, 677 3, , , 6 452, , ,238 C ) 7, 4 3,9 277, ,439 27, 7 323, 3 5, ,6 2, 539 2,3 9,36.2 3,33 42,,7,92 COAL Anthracite: Exports thous. of long tons Prices: Retail, composite, chestnut^ dol. per short ton Wholesale, composite, chestnut t dol. per short ton f thous. of short tons.. 4,279 3,6 4, 5,23 6,46 2,73 4,336 4,577 3,9 3,6 3, 223 3,764 Shipmentsf thous. of short tons.. 3,68 2,8 4,6 4,8 5,4 2,429 4,27 4,2 3,56 3,345 2,97 3,44 a Revised. * Data not available. Nov. estimate. / Dec. estimate. frevised series. For revisions refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues, as follows: Exports of tobacco for 2, p. 42, June 3, data revised for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue. For 4 revisions see p. 9 of the issue. 2finalrevision of anthracite production, p. 42, 4. Anthracite shipments for 2, p. 42, 3. For revised data for 2 on sugar meltings and stocks, see p. 4 of the May 3 issue. For 2 revisions of sugar imports and exports see p. 4 of the June 3 issue. For revisions of exports in 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue. Revised data on shipments and stocks of refined sugar at 2 ports (for period 925-April ) are shown on p. 8 of the issue. The change resulted from a reduction in the number of reporting refineries. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. Data revised for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue. For 4 revisions, see p. 2 of the issue. Revisions on cold-storage holdings of fish not shown in the issue will appear in a subsequent issue. {Price converted to short-ton basis. Data on a short-ton basis prior to April were not published. Earlier monthly data were reported on a long-ton basis. A Note major correction in data on imports of refined sugar from Cuba, June- 4, were shown in the issue. New series. For earlier data, see p. 2 of the August 4 issue, for receipts of refined sugar from Hawaii and Puerto Rico and imports from Cuba. Data prior to May 4 on imports of refined sugar from the Philippine Islands are not available. ^Monthly retail price of coal was discontinued with the month of August. Subsequent to that month the price is reported quarterly. v Preliminary Digitized for FRASER, 6,67 6,23 2,42, , 342 4, 2 3,96 37,

48 46 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Digitized for FRASER Monthly statistics through,, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey COAL Continued Anthracite Continued. Stocks in storage: * Total _thous. of short tons.. Stocks, in yards of dealers, end of month no. of days' supply- Bituminous: Consumption: Coke plants thous. of short tons.. Electric power plantst thous. of short tons._ Railroads thous. of short tons.. Vessels, bunker thous. of long tons.. Exports thous. of long tons.. Price, retail composite, 38 cities! dol. per short ton.. Prices, wholesale: Composite, mine run.dol. per short ton- Prepared sizes (composite) dol. per short ton..! thous. of short tons.. Stocks, consumers, and retail dealers, end of month thous. of short tons.. COKE Exports thous. of long tons.. Price, furnace, Connellsville dol. per short ton.. : Beehivef..thous. of short tons.. Byproduct! thous. of short tons.. Petroleum thous. of short tons.. Stocks, end of month: Byproduct plants thous. of short tons.. Petroleum, refinery--thous. of short tons.. PETROLEUM AND PRODUCTS Crude petroleum: Consumption (run to stills)_thous. of bbl Imports! thous. of bbl Price, Kansas-Oklahoma dol. per bbl.. f thous. of bbl.. Refinery operations pet. of capacity.. Stocks, end of month: California: Heavy crude and fuel oilj thous. of bbl.. Light crude thous. of bbl.. East of California, totalt.thous. of bbl.. RefineriesfS thous. of bbl.. Tank farms and pipe linesf thous. of bbl.. Wells completed!} 3efined products: Gas and fuel oils: Consumption: Electric power plantst-.thous. of bbl.. Railroads. _ thous. of bbl.. Vessels, bunker thous. of bbl. Price, fuel oil, Oklahoma, refineries dol. per bbl.. : Residual fuel o\l*t thous. of bbl.. Gas, oil and distillate fuels*t thous. of bbl_. Stocks: Residual fuel oil, east of California*f thous. of bbl_. Gas, oil and distillate fuels, total* thous. of bbl.. Gasoline: Consumption!} thous. of bbl_. Exports* thous. of bbl. Exports, value. (See Foreign trade.) Price, wholesale: Drums, delivered, N. Y..dol. per gal_. Refinery, Oklahoma del. per gal.. Price, retail, service station, 5 cities dol. per gal.. : At natural gas plants -thous. of bbl.-i At refineriesf thous. of bbl.. i Retail distribution (4 States)! i mills, of gal.. I 8tocks, end of month: I At natural gas plants...thous. of bbl.. i At refineriesf thous. of bbl_. Novern-, Dp-, Febru- ; March j Apd, May June i July August FUELS AND BYPRODUCTS Continued 2,473 6,223 3,8 64, v 42, ,7,6 2,6.4,26 ~2~724., ,239 4,539 3,437 5, ,768 39r , 9 2, ,32 2,85.94, ,3 35,59 2,568 5, 222,87,243, 3,8 2,.7 2, ,649 3,43 5, ,44,9!,27 i! 35! 23 i S! , 42 \ 4, 99 I 4, 764 : 4, 8 5,33 I 5, 542 3,39 5, 78 I ,453 i 6,78 j 96 I 323 : , 3,3 6, ,22 b, 67 ' 38 ; 2,859 I 5, ! i ; ,3 ; 39,33 4.6SS : ,3 : 3,233 3,38,9 i 37,7 i 33,52 29,542 25, 26, ,2 8 3,26 ' I,8 2,28.94, , 37,646 27,96 5,4 22,4,38 22,2 I 23, ! 9 I 3,364 ' 6 2, 78 j 3! , 39! 2! 2,! 8,598 I 9,5,587,25,!,2 I 9,553 I 26,2 25,59 l 22,7 I 2,28 j 8,27 \ 7,529 ; 6,996 24, 299 4,4 2, ,5 4, 6 «,2 2,442 27, 28,2 3,6 2,329.73,992 3,6 i.94,7 i 73! 6, 227, i 63, ,944 i 4,64 i 4,2 268,78 i 2, i 263,436 * 49, " 47, G "29,692 26,46, 49 ;,99,32 3, 773! 2,4.725! 25,5 85, 776 2,256 '.5, ' ,4 8, ,523 2,8.4,2 i 76 ',! 3,7 s 2, 59! 24,573 25, 9,24 3,7 i 2, , ! 9 3,257 5,444 36! ,.4 9, r ,545 2,4.4 9, , 34 63, ,856 39,338 2, ,56 5, i 53, ,5 5,92 6, ,54 28, ,3 3,6 3 9, 637 2,.4, , , , 53, i 25,57 24,,287!,557, !,4 3,878 3,8 3,4 3,5 : 2,643 3, ,7 I 23, 23, 263 9,! 7, 5,322 5,6, 7,3 35,6 I 33,734 2,76 I 2,946 < ,598. 3,4 I 4,26 j 4,7 a,2,945 28,43. i I 32,553 I 27,26 35,87 ; 38,5 2,38 ',435,44 ' 2,4.54 ; 6 ' :.42 I 3, 3 i 3,96 39,544 I 37,76 ',2 973; 3,645!,3 j,3 3,328! 36,58 ; 44, , 37S 38, 764,9 2,72 45, , 2 39, 92, 2, , 925,69 8, 2 9,9 42, 7 2, , 2 4,,239 2,946 42, 527 i,24,, ' 67 5,472 : 5,59 3,322 4, ! 4.33 I 29,3 j 3,767 6,47 24, S46 32,54 28,3 i 3, '! 3.6 ' ' 2,72 3 C , 399,3 92, 79 2,872 2,59.4 :.4 9,85 ' 92, 78 8! SO 63,77 ' 64,3 37,856 i 36,78 2,554 S 2,3 53,8! 53,22 2,926 j,4 i,56 3,8 3, ,499 28,792 2,7,228 4v6 2, ,44 9,567! ! 46,638,5 ' 2,67.,.6 i : 992 2,347 "7 '. 2 : , ,8 i «3, 6 6,333! 34 : ; S 37,2 32,7 ] 34,5 69 : P i ,8 2 j,9 \ 49 ',444 2,87.4, , 23 2, , 872 2,9.4 9, ,5 64,564 35,476! 34,23 258, ,969 5,69 5, ,994! 23,5,5 ', ",33 <:,2 4,58 i.- 2, 7 i 3, 2 t. 23,287! 23,54 3,7 ], 8, 56! 9, 525 2, 379 j 2,S2 22,4 24, 27,645 ) 27,87 46,8 44,34fi 2,29 i ,27 3,355 i 3,57 ; 3,5 4,! , 56 44,24,324,46 JS372!. 2,973 39,5 2,92 2,3 ' , I 33,43: 3,239 a Revised. b Figures revised to reflect transfers between pipeline and refinery stocks beginning. f Revised series. For revisions refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues, as follows: Consumption of bituminous coal by electric power plants lor 2, p. 42. May 3; for 3, p. 42, May 4. Data also revised for 4 and. Revisions not shown on p. 43 of the June issue and p. 46 of the May issue will appear in a subsequent issue. Bituminous coal production for 2, p. 42, 4. Bituminous coal production revised for 3 and 4. Revisions not shown in the May issue will appear in a subsequent issue. For revisions see p. 46 of the March issue. Beehive and byproduct coke for 2, p. 43 of the Dec. 3 issue, and for 3 revisions see p. 43, July 4. Data for 4 and also revised; revisions not shown in the July and tbe August issues will appear in a subsequent issue. Crude petroleum production, stocks, east of California (total), at refineries and at tank farms and pipe lines, and wells completed, for 2; see footnote on p. 56, 3. Consumption of gas and fuel oils in electric power plants for 2, p. 43, May 3; for 3 revisions, p. 43, May 4. Data also revised for 4. Revisions for months Dot shown for 4 on p. 44 of the June issue will appear in a subsequent issue. Data revised for ; see p. 46 of the May issue. of residual fuel oils and?as oil and distillate fuels, stocks of residual fuel oil east of California, consumption of gasoline, production of gasoline at natural-gas plants and refineries, stocks of gasoline at refineries for 2, p. 56, 3; retail distribution of gasoline in 4 States for 2, p. 43, May 3; for 3, p. 43, May 4. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. Imports also revised for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue; for 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issue Data revised for 3. See p. 2 of the issue. For 4 see p. 2 of the issue. Data revised for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue; or 4 revisions see p. 9 of the issue. *New series. For earlier data see p. 2 of the 3 issue, production and stocks of residual fuel oil and gas oil and distillate fuels. ^Monthly retail price of coal was discontinued with the month of August. Subsequent to that month the price will be shown quarterly A Beginning with August 4 < p Preliminary. J certain anthracite stocks were included which had not been covered in previous reports.

49 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April j May June July August!' FUELS AND BYPRODUCTS Continued PETROLEUM AND PRODUCTS- Continued Refined products Continued. Kerosene: Consumptionf } thous. of bbl. Exports thous. of bbl. Price, 5 water white, refinery, Pa. dol. per gal.! thous. of bbl. Stocks, end of month thous. of bbl. Lubricating oil: Consumptiont thous. of bbl. Price, cylinder oil, refinery, Pa. dol. per gal. ^ thous. of bbl. Stocks, refinery, end of month thous. of b^- Other products: Asphalt: Imports# thous, of short tons. fs thous. of short tons. Stocks, refinery, end of month thous. of short tons. Coke. (See Coke.) Wax: thous. of lb. Stocks, refinery, end of mo thous. of lb , ,978 9,38,.2 2,463 6, ,2 24,557 4, , ,878 4,4 8, 879 7,, ,453 6, ,72 2, 398, ,4 7,25 3 i 23 I 45 5, ,76 6, 599, ,39 7, ,32 44, 8 4,6 I 8,636 4, ,445 5,7 4, , 5,9 3, ,3 6,496,52,3 2, ,24 7, j.35 2,55 7, ,687 7, ,2 42,28 39, 4, ,6 6,68 2, , 768 6,4 4, 32 3, 4.55 i 4,376 I 7,296 i,969 :.54 2, ,32 9,6 j 2,857 2,46 7,3 8,257 6, ,228 2,23 2, 6 3, , 297 8,69, ,8,! 6, S ,428 38, j 35, j. 44 LEATHER AND PRODUCTS HIDES AND SKINS Imports, total hides and skinsf#-thous. of lb._ 2,67 27, 7 25,373 2/, 52 28, , ,963 28,6 25, ! 26,5 23, Calf and kip skins thous. of lb..,57 2,236,96 2,29 2,39 2,35,354,25 2,336 l',434 I 2,5,68 3,97 Cattle hides - -.thous. of lb. 7,325 2, 67,63,53 2,768 3,498 3,63 2, 63, 296 3,45 \,9 2,4 fc, 42< j Goatskins thous. of lb 5,5 5,5 6,299 6,492 6,42 5,573 8,56 7,9 8,292 5,69 6,452 5,24 6,8-3 Sheep and lamb skins. thous. of lb_. 4,77 5,7 2,685 3,872 3,499 3,2 4,8 4, 2,549 5,9! 4,792 3,52 4, 3M Livestock, inspected slaughter: r r : CalvesA thous. of animals i CattleA thous. of animals..,24, ,2,7 Hogs. thous. of animals 3,492 2,35 2,422 2,8 3,428 2,39 2,67 2,559 2, ' 2,692 2,254 2, 4S SheepA thous. of animals..,2,7,47,369,54,34,3, 267,23,39 (,352,3, 'f'k> Prices, wholesale: Packers, heavy native steers, Chicago dol. per lb i Calfskins, packer's 8 to 5 lbs., Chicago dol. per lb ; Exports: LATHEE Sole leather _ -thous. of lb._ ; Upper leatherf* thous. of sq. ft.. 6,6 8,563 8,57 5,2 5,2 5,44 5,234 5,7 5,5 4,8 j 4,6 4, 787 :~( rrouuci/ion. Calf and kip* thous. of skins..,253,5,92,,2 96,46 998,99 ',2,58 i, on a Cattle hides*f thous of hides 2,,7,924,943,856,98,4,6,7 i,4,8,7 Goat and kid*j thous. of skins 4,5 4,26 4,3 4,68 3,7 3,7 4,8 3,99 4, 55 3,9 3,9 3,947 4, 3, 2, 3, a 3j 392 'J>, G. r 4 Sheep and lamb*fj thous of skins Prices, wholesale: 8 3,53 3,35 3,25 2,4 2,925 2,7 S49 ' 237 Sole, oak, scoured backs (Boston) dol. per lb._ Upper, composite, chrome, calf, black, ! "B" grade dol. per sq. ft s. S7G "7'?. S7^ Stocks of cattle hides and leathers (all kinds) end of month: a Total* thous. of equiv hides 8,8 8,77 7,735 7,7 7,7 7, 797 7,5 7, 7 7,94! 7,6&7 7, v In process and finished* Raw* a thous. of equiv. hides,42,377,, 576,568,5,734,779,8,676,47 thous. of equiv. hides.. 6, 6,7 a 6,547 6,23 6,28 6,42 6, 6, 4S 6, ,39 2, lf.5 LEATHER MANUFACTURES Gloves and mittens:»47,776» 25,8 i23,26 2,3 23, 25 l 242, : 243, S2o»,4 7,79 U7,32 2, 26,46 53, 229 U5t; l4( Work*.. dozen pairs 8, 5 85, 38 68,2 64,2 73, 92 87, 29 85, l 79, i 76) l, 52 i 87) ]kjj Shoes: Exports thous of pairs Priofs wholesale* Men's black calf blucher, factory dol. per pair : Men's black calf oxford, (cut), total* Dress and seinidress* dozen pairs dozen pairs.. 2,857 78, , 7 68,7 63,467 94,725 i,5 i9,573 22,4 >i 39,73 factory dol. per pair._ : (_ Women's colored blucher,* factory dol. per pair n Revised. Data for 234 manufacturers not available for these months. Figures shown are computed by means of the month-to-month percentage change indicated by the current Census Bureau report for 228 identical concerns. IRaw stocks in all hands as shown above include all hides from Government animals slaughtered under Federal inspection. Hides from cattle allotted to State relki agencies and which were not killed under Federal inspection are not included unless they have already moved into sight. It is obvious, therefore, that a quantity of hides from noninspected slaughter held by State Relief Agencies constitutes an invisible addition to the visible supplies shown on p. 47 of the August issue. JData on production of sheep and lamb and goat and kid leathers from have been revised. For revisions not shown on p. 44 of the April issue see p. J' of the June issue. * Government relief slaughter included for the period June 4-. See p. 44 of the June issue for the figures, excluding relief slaughter. For sheep and lambs, relief slaughter only affected the data for the months of to 4. Data revised for 3. See p. 2 of the issue. For 4 see p. 2 of the issue. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. Imports revised for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue, for 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issue. New series: For earlier data refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues. Leather production, p. 9, June 3; leather stocks, p. 9,. New series on gloves and mittens cover 234 identical manufactures as reported to the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data prior to July 4 are not avair able. These data are not comparable with data through 4 previously shown. New series on wholesale price of women's shoes began 4. Data DO; shown on p. 47 of the March issue will appear in a subsequent issue. trevised series. For earlier data refer to the indicated pages of the monthly issues. of cattle, sheep, and lamb leather for 2 and 3, p. 44, April 9&4. of cattle hides revised for, p. 47 of the April issue. Imports of total hides and skins for 2, exports of upper leather for 2, p. 43, June 3. of asphalt for 2 and consumption of kerosene and lubricating oil, for 2, see p. 56 of the 3 issue. Data revised for 3. See p. 2 of the 4 issue; for 4 revisions see p. 9 of the issue. Digitized for FRASER

50 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey uctoder ber LEATHER AND PRODUCTS Continued March April May June July August LEATHER MANUFACTURES Con. Shoes Continued., total! thous. of pairs.. Men'sf..thous. of pairs.. Boys' and youths'! -thous. of pairs.- Women's! thous. of pairs.. Misses' and children's!--thous. of pairs.. Slippers, all types! thous. of pairs.. All other footwear! thous. of pairs.. 39,3,,692 3, 772 3,34 6, 3,56 35,9 9,98,72, 3, 6,24 3,85 27, 8,6,33 7,34 2,673 5, 57 2,947 28, 949 8,44,354 9,794 2,9 3,277 3,24 32, 42 9,43,267 3, 436 3,292,633 3,9 32,42 8,33,3 3, 3 3,7 2,4 3,79 34,59 8,223,264 4,44 3,237 2,726 4,268 32, 6 8,27,22 3,42 3,54 2,94 4,339 29,87 7,29,3,96 2,476 3,39 4,36 29,7 7,558,39,463 2,37 3,6 3,6 35, 2 8,738,556 4, 2 3, 43 4,4 3, 4, 225 9,296,5 7, 59 3,437 5,92 3,225 ' 4, 444 9, 59 «, 64 6, 528 «3, 354 «5, 968 a 3, 472 LUMBER ALL TYPES Exports (boards, planks, and scantlings)* I M ft. b. m-.4 National Lumber Mfgrs. Assn :-M, total mill. ft. b. m._ 2,56 Hardwoods mill. ft. b. m._ 28 Softwoods mill. ft. b. m..i,8 Shipments, total.. mill. ft. b. m._ 2,69 Hardwoods mill. ft. b. m.. 29 Softwoods mill. ft. b. m._,878 Stocks, gross, end of month total: mill. ft. b. m.. 7,37 Hardwoods mill. ft. b. m..,8 Softwoods mill. ft. b. m.- 5,496 Retail movement: Retail yards, Ninth Fed. Res. Dist.: Sales M ft. b. m._ 4,355 Stocks, end of month M ft. b. m._ 67,785 Retail yards, Tenth Fed. Res. Dist.: Sales -._ M ft. b. m._ 4,6 Stocks, end of month M ft. b. m._ 3,6 Flooring Maple, beech, and birch:! Orders: New.Mft.b.m.J Unfilled, end of month _Mft. b. ml _Mft. b. m- Shipments _M ft. b. m Stocks, end of month.mft. b. m_. Oak: Orders: New.M ft. b. m. Unfilled, end of month Shipments Stocks, end of month Fir, Douglas: Exports:! Lumber* Tirnber Orders: Softwoods.M ft. b m. _M ft. b. m. _M ft. b. m..mft.b.m. M ft. b. m._ M ft. b. m. M ft. b. m._ Unfilled, end of monthd*. M ft. b. m.. Price, wholesale: No. common dol. per M ft. b. m._ Flooring, x4, "B" and better v. g.* dol. per M ft. b. m._ ^ M ft. b. Shipments^ M ft. b. m. Pine, northern: M ft. b. re- M ft. b. m._ M ft. b. m._ Orders, new production Shipments Pine, southern: Exports: Lumber M ft. b. m.. Timber - M ft. b. m_. Orders: New...-M ft. b. m._ Unfilled, end of month M ft. b. m._ Price, flooring dol. per M ft. b. m M ft. b. m._ Shipments M ft. b. m._ Redwood, California:^ Orders: New M ft. b. m. 39, 2 4,922 33, 4 33, 5 64, 2 2, 2 22, 5 ) 42. 2,4 3, 4 2, 7 24, 797 4,23 49, 329 6, , , 49 LUMBER AND MANUFACTURES 77,8,97 32, 9,7 27,52 7,2,943 5,78 ' 3, 72 64,942 3,354 28,64 4,634 4,763 5,5 4, 2,497 24,3 4,347 2,642 23,4 52,3 22, 677 4, 5 ), 258, 273,347,4 2,227 7,235,5 5,3 8,676 63,37 3,6 27,78 4,54 4,6 5,9 4,69 2,23 25,25 9,925 2,3 9,547 54,9 2, 227 7, ,4 2,392,9 24, 35 3,56 43,6 69,9 36.6,5 45,97 9,239, 9,322 24,999 5,73 28,5 68, ,9 28, 57, 2,422 27,25,33 22, 7,273, 5,358 4,594 6,3 2,45 28,637 5,768 6,444 4,279 3,997 2, ,64 25,492 24, 23 9,497 58,5 26,39 2, ) ,22 2 6,535 27,,492 24, 9, , 928 5, 3,5,49 229,26, , 7,23, 5,298 3,677 7,4 2,4 29,794 6,98,368 4,263 3,879 2, 29 3,24 35,3 22, 7 2, 3 6,3 24,99 23, 456 ) 45. 9, ,29 2,9 7,72 5, , , 35 2,632,73,353 25,38, ,229 7,3,2 5,22 2,3 77,73 2,68 32,69,33 4,23 3,6 2,77 4,6 52,2 2, 23,8 6,5 9, 542 9,455 ) 46. 7, ,25 8, 56, 26 25, 8 72, , 54 25, 46 9, 328, ,343,6 28,47,3 5,55 4,329 8,49 3,2 32, 396,38 6,456 4,4 5,324 2, 645 9,38 43,7 27, 67 28,479 58,6 23,498 2,985 ( 46. 7, ,463 28, 6,,856, , 226 6,5 96,53,94,8 253,63,2 267,6 6,3,6 5,97 7,2 8,85 4,9 32,43 4,39 5,2 5,439 5,457 2,33 9, 2 33,52 3, 76 29,4 59,96 4, 4 23,37 ) 45. 9,92 3,697,6 22,8 7,56, 25 87, ,87 7, 446, , 259,5 7,3,2 5,8,227 79,392 3,7 32, 426 3,4 3,59 4,437 5,528 8, 77 23, 2 28,564 3, ,579 6,5 28, 4, ) 45. 9, 6, 2,364 2,7 6, 55,2 8, , 529,44, 255,6 273,3,6 257,5 7,6,5 5,25 3,92 72,456 3,437 32,459 5,85 2,396 4,72 5, 7,5 3, ,523 32, 3 3,67 27,33 8, 32 ) 43.5, 57 23, 23 2, 55 22,6 6,358 4,349 67, , , 234, 23 2,55 2,773,94 259,5 7,2,8 5,334,7 77,794 3, 3,4 5,56 8,4 5,259 6,777 5, ,463 26,3 32,98 3,23 64,926 32,63 23,9 ( 85,!,49,99 2,76,7 267,6 7,358,3 5,476 2, 42,99 4,37 3, 445 6,46, 6 5,964 6,526 5, 92 32,3 29, 3,872 3,, 39 27, 67 9, , 68 26, 37 2, 3 25, 463 5,37 36,7 56, ,342 42,, 92 24, 27, 68 9, 6 4,224,68 72, , 9 46, 7, , 694,963 2,6 7,3,7 5,4 2, 2 72, 28 3,536 3, 349 7,4, 9 6,247 6,4 5, 63 4, 67 36, ,378 33, ,336 28, 92 3, 776 ( 42.,228 2, 9,736 9, 5 6,587 53,794 69, , 8 57, 22 34, ,5 27,456 28,54 29,579 34, 54 32,979 4, 535 3,57 29, 3, 63 32,2 34, 426 Unfilled M ft. b. m 33, 26, 29 27, 446 3,97 35, S8 44, 4 43, 49 49,43 44, 23 39, 25 37,72 36, 68 33, 78 M ft. b. m 4, 4 38,73 33,87 3,369 3,38 32,85 37,38 37, 5 37, , 7 35, ,9 38, 928 Shipments.._ M ft. b. m 33, 27,2 25, 76 23, 76 27,68 24,7 34, , 5 35, 27 37, 433 3,992 33, , 39 Revised. l Data temporarily discontinued. New series. For data on lumber exports for period of 99 to 2, see p. 2 of the 2 issue. See special footnote below on lumber production, shipments, and stocks.!data revised for 2, see p. 44 of the June 3 issue, exports of Douglasfir lumber and timber. Boot and shoe production for 4, p. 45, March issue, for revision see p. of the March issue. Data revised for 3. See p. 2 of the 4 issue; for 4 revisions see p. 9 of the issue. A New series on lumber production, shipments, and stocks compiled by National Lumber Manufacturers' Association and represent an estimate of the total lumber cut based on monthly reports received from regional associations covering between 8 and 9 percent of the total cut in 4 and 7 to 8 percent in. No comparable figures are available prior to 4. ISeries have been revised for period 4-. These are shown on p. 2 of the issue. ^Beginning with 4 the report includes all known operators; prior to that time approximately percent of the listed capacity. Data revised for 2. For revisions of exports of Southern pine lumber and timber, see p. 45 of the June 3 issue. Data revised for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue. For 4 revisions see p. 9 of the issue. cf New series covering these items will be shown in a subsequent issue.

51 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 49 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Novem- ber March April May June July August LUMBER AND MANUFACTURES Continued FURNITURE Household: All districts: Plant operations* percent of normal.. Grand Rapids district: Orders: Canceled percent of new orders.. New _.no. of days' production.. Unfilled, end of month no. of days' production... Outstanding accounts, end of month no. of days' sales.. Plant operations! percent of normal.. Shipments no. of days' production.. Prices, wholesale: Beds. 926=.. Dining-room chairs, set of =.. Kitchen cabinets 926=.. Living-room davenports 926=.. Steel furniture. (See Iron and Steel Section.) i 3 i 24 ; !.! ! ; ' IRON AND STEEL Foreign trade, iron and steel: Exports. long tons. Imports*# long tons. Price, iron and steel, composite* dol. per long ton.. Ore Iron ore: Consumption by furnaces thous. of long tons.. Imports)? thous. of long tons.. Receipts: Lake Erie ports and furnaces thous. of long tons_- Other ports thous. of long tons Shipments from upper Lake ports thous. of long tons- Stocks, total, end of month thous. of long tons.. At furnaces thous. of long tons.. Lake Erie docks thous. of long tons.. Manganese ore, imports (manganese content) -.-.thous. of long tons.. Iron, Crude and Semimanufactured Castings, malleable:* Orders, new short tons-. short tons.- Percent of capacity _. Shipments..short tons Pig iron: Furnaces in blast, end of month: Capacity long tons per day.. Number -. Prices, wholesale: Basic (valley furnace).-dol. per long ton.. Composite pig iron dol. per long ton.. Foundry, no. 2, northern (Pitts.) dol. per long ton... thous. of long tons Iron, Manufactured Products Cast-iron boilers and radiators: Boilers, range:f Orders: New...number of boilers.- Unfllled, end of month, totals number of boilers-. number of boilers-- Shipments number of boilers ~- Stocks, end of month.number of boilers. - Boilers, round:...thous. oflb Shipments thous. oflb-- Stocks, end of month thous. oflb.. Boilers, square: thous. oflb-- Shipments thous. of lb~ Stocks, end of month thous. of lb ,385 5,3, 9 7,3 35,56 3, 377 4,78 55, 52 5, , , ,992 69, 5 69,9 42, 94 44, 2 37,6 4, , 338 METALS AND MANUFACTURES 238, , ,9 4 3,,453 4,6 35,5 29, 6 5, , , ,32 67, ,978, , 644,328 8, 59 4, 49 6,467 9,5 35, 3 25, , , 26 58, ,557 34, ,964 5, , , ,434 7, , 64,34 25, , 5 64, 338 4,2 3,7 4,7 34, , , 8 3,342 26,2 5, 3 42,573 45, ,942, ,6 55,36 3,999 57,723,726 49,5 3,287 4,8 33,644 24, 568 5, , , 44 23, 434 4,97 43,852, ,3 63, ,26 7, 25,545,49 77, , 69 2,977 3,2 34,6 23, 43, , , 2, 94 4,94 3 I 38, 278 4, , 3 64, ,4,43 25, 3, 8, 36 4,42 3,343 2,437 35, 53 64, , i 22, 3 8,99 4,734 2,8 45, , 3 68, , , , , 37 5,24 4,3 9 47, 3 5,4.6 5,, , 4 2, 44,649! 57,63 26, 94 2,77 64, 227, 773,7 63,5 43,332 45,557 3,4! 3,456,4 I,6 37,738 35,429 34, 59, ,,49 5,5 9, 242 5, 269 3, ,36 45, ,854, ,6, , 58 6, 352 6,94 44, 3,639 2,243 44, 2 294, 59? , , 692,3 23,7 8, 7 4, , 8 43, , 4 85, , 5 73, , 279,242 72, 92 38,6 3,339 3, 4,6 296,738 2,34 j ,94 6,697 j 59, ,6 98 5, 64 2, 6,68 ] 7,6 25, 2 2,94 4,7 2 4,3 44, ,58, ,594 5, 4 64,67 8,36 78, , 5 3, 3, 4,34 j 32, 8 27,425 7,7 8,94 7,599 8,454 7, ,43 2, 5 i 24, 7 27, 2 i 29, 45, 96 4, 38 2,325 6,33 3, 7,5 8,9 29 3,552 9, , 2! 24, , 5 5,96 2,592 ' 4,9 4,696 2,258 29, , , 99 39, 69 ' 42, 225 ' 37, 67 New series. Data on furniture activity, all districts, prior to April 3 not published. For imports of iron and steel, see p. 2 of the 2 issue; for malleable castings, p. 2 of the April 3 issue. New series on iron and steel composite price was shown on p. 9 of the /n ssue. For 2, 3, and 4 revisions, see p. 45 of the June 3 issue, p. 2 of the 4 issue, and p. 9 of the issue, respectively. t Revised. Data prior to April 3 not published on plant operations. For range boilers, see p. 2 of the July 4 issue. Imports from Cuba not included. See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. For 3 and 4 revisions, see p. 2 of the 4 issue and p. 2 of the issue, respectively, ^S Distrioution of unfilled orders of deliveries of 3 days or less and deliveries of more than 3 days has been discontinued by the reporting source. b Partly estimated. I h 3, o, 2 2,5 7,444 28,58 24, 8 4,5 4 45,79 42, , 554, ,72, , 28 3, 7 ( J9 39, 64 3,2! 3,634 39, ,3, 94 7, 3, , 555 4, , ,94 94, , 73 9,42 44, 58 96, 7 96, 6 39, 233 4,7 5. 3b, 76

52 Digitized for FRASER 5 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, together with explanatory footnotes and refera aces in Vh 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey i March April May June July August IRON AND STEEL Continued Iron, Manufactured Products Con. Oast-iron boilers and radiators Continued. Boiler fittings, cast iron: short tons.. 9,9 Shipments.. short tons..,7 Boiler fittings, malleable: short tons.. 5,639 Shipments short tons.. 5,794 Badiators: thous. of sq. ft. heating surface.. 9,94 Shipments thous. of sq. ft. heating surface.. 2, 452 Stocks, end of month thous. of sq. ft. heating surface.. 35,99 Radiators, convection type:* New orders: Heating elements only, without cabinets or grilles thous. of sq. ft. heating surfacet-- 4 H eating elements, including cabinets and grilles thous. of sq. ft. heating surfacef Sanitary Ware 3ars, steel, coldfinished,shipments short tons.. Castings, steel:*a Orders, new, total....short tons.. Percent of capacity. Railway specialties short tons.., total... short tons.. Percent of capacity Railway specialities..short tons.. Ingots, steel: thous. of long tons.. Percent of capacity Prices, wholesale: Composite,finishedsteel dol. per lb.. Steel billets, Bessemer, Pittsburgh dol. per long ton.. Structural-steel beams, Pittsburgh dol. per lb.. Steel scrap, Chicago dol. per gross ton.. XI. S. Steel Corporation: Earnings, net thous. of dol.. Shipments,finished products*. Jong tons.. Steel, Manufactured Products Barrels, steel: Orders, unfilled, end of month... _ number- Percent of capacity METALS AND MANUFACTURES Continued 59, ,9, 7.7 3,6 4, ,7,4" 7,45 8,454 4, 4,67 6,5 6, 4,532 4,357 7,43 I 5,37, 55 6, 3,4 3, 343, , 8, 57 34,6 4,68! 349,2 34, 2 5,77 79,57 i 535, , ,873 i 476, 4 578, i ! Shipments 6,9 79, ,947,98 478,5! 47, 577, 24 Stocks, end of month! 2,852 36,5 34,56 3, 29, 7 I 34,55 35, 26 Revised. & Data covering non-vitreous clay, recessed and attachable accessories not included i 3! 7 I Bathroom accessories:f number of pieces.. 3,58 i 464,76 292,77 2, 5! 3,8 37, , 533 IM87, 942 Shipments number of pieces.. 326,585!,42 2,996 26,9 254, ,338 I 3,7 H,7 Stocks, end of month number of pieces.. 47,6! 387,233 3, 4, ' 526', ,4 587, I b 522, 25 Plumbing brass. (See Nonferrous metals.) Plumbing and heating equipment, wholesale price (8 pieces)* dollars. _j , 28.3 I i Porcelain enameled flatware:! Orders, new, total dollars..;,39. 7, 394,5,9 773,8! 7, , 598,,5,5,79,22 3,27,98 Signs d o ars. _ 2( I, , 5 236, 38 9,7 2,239 I 223,'" 26,5 2, 338 2,99 2, , 7 Table tops dollars.. 258,369!,7 236,73, 96,87 54,29 238, 47 87, G 2,4 294,246 Shipments, total... dollars..,2^. "2 949,349 87,8 676, 6 97,9 727, 98, 433,76,233,2, , 254,55,73 Signs dollars.. 2'.>o, 44 28, I 249,53 96,287 6, 69,453 22, , , 25 2, 5 298, 549 Table tops dollars.. 3K.">,. 298,499,77 69,96 72, Porcelain plumbing fixtures: 94, , 73 76, 2 25, 7, 9S 234, 4 3, 63 Orders: New, net.number of pieces.. 3, ; 2,58,594 2, 529 2, 2, 692 2,44 2,526 3,7 Unfilled, end of month number of pieces.. 3,5 I 2, 763,92 2,722 3,227 2, 3 3,53 3,25 I 3,924 () Shipments number of pieces.. 2,73 j 2, 6,5,597,73 2, 68,6 2,! 3, 34 Stocks, end of months..number of pieces.. 6,685 6,8 ^ 7,268 7, 6 8,5 8, 9 9, 55 9,6 : 9,27 ( 2 ) Vitreous-china plumbing fixtures:! Orders: New, net...number of pieces.. 32,378 32,7 39, , 43 24,249,4 43, , 87 Unfilled, end of month number of pieces._ 7,2 i 2, 28,2 28, 7 256,377 94, , 58, 38 Shipments.. number of pieces.. 9,229 37, ,97 29, 229, , 4 68, 67, 367 Stocks, end of month...number of pieces.. 424,242 56, 677 9, 645,8 642,8 6, 2 738, 58 6,9 Steel, Crude and Semimanufactured 47, 3 34, ,2 42, , 347 3, , 67 32, ,7 36, 3.3,24 3, *" ~68l~~ 5,5 4,2 3,794 2,53 4,76 5,43 29, , 285 4, ,99 37,7 3.7,76 3, ,,55 5,73 5,94 3,97 3,3 4,733 4, 3, ,7 5,27 3,9 3,4 4, 3, 32, ,72 5,325 3,87 3,3 5,46 2,72 34, ,97 I 27,97 3,378 59, , , , 373 3, ,44 5,7 43.4! 6,; 47, , 2, ! 29. j.8 I , 35 7, , 542 5, ,385 3, ,6 7,552 6,32 5,94 4,296 4,2 6,345 3,549 36, ,52, , , ,72 3, , 5, , 7 26,99 5,768 5,923 4,96 4,442 6,253 4, 4, , , , 5 64, ,857 4,46 j 7 j ,97 4, 636, , 9,599 5,98 6,32 4,73 4,22 5, 5,59 4, ,78 94, ,4 7, , 3, , , 3 6, , 9,33 6,44 7,69 4,233 4,44 6, 8,27 39, ,3,. 34, , 4. 34,858 3, C, , 8 677, , 9 23, 7,6 9,529 4,225 5,697 7,7 7,785 39, ,5,92 257,32 355, 7,87,6 285,5 3,5 8,2 9,63 5, 2 5,454 7,97 9,9 38, () ( 2 ) 39, 59, ,455 8, , «4, , , 5 55, , 7 2,26,9,943 C 235, , 987,92,52 36,6 338, 5 4,49 56, ,6 76, 67 F , 34 4, , 96, 456, 6 G97, , 33 23, 8 s Discontinued by reporting source. *Data on convection type radiators prior to 2 not available. For earlier data on wholesale price of plumbing and heating equipment, see p 2 of the 3 issue; for steel castings, see p. 2 of the 4 issue; and for United States Steel Corporation shipments, see p. 8 of the 4 issue. tin equivalent direct radiation. frevised series. For earlier data on bathroom accessories see p. 2 of the 3 issue. Data on vitreous-china plumbing fixtures revised, beginning 3, see p. 47 of the April issue; revisions for 3 will be shown in a subsequent issue. ASteel casting series revised by the increase of the number of companies from 64 to 8; comparable data not completed for 4 and earlier years. Figures for 64 companies in were new orders, total 3,, percent of capacity 2.3; new orders, railway specialties, 6,5; production, total 28,59; percent of capacity 8.2; production, railway specialties 6,52 jfor 2 revisions see p. 46 of the July 3 issue; for 3, p. 47 of the August 4 issue; for 4, p. 5 of the August issue; for, p. 5 of the June issue.

53 !n SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 5 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey \ Novem-, Decemher": ber - Febru- March April May June July August IRON AND STEEL Continued Steel, Manufactured Products Con. Boilers, steel, new orders: Area thous. of sq. ft.. Quantity - number of boilers.. Furniture, steel: Business group: Orders: New thous. of dol. Unfilled, end of month..thous. of dol. Shipments tbous. of dol.. Shelving:* Orders: New thoua. of dol. Unfilled, end of month..thous. of dol. Shipments thous. of dol. 8afes: Orders: New thous. of dol. Unfilled, end of month..thous. of dol. Shipments thous. of dol. Lock washers, shipments thous. of dol. Plate, fabricated steel, new orders, total short tons.. Oil storage tanks short tons.. Sheets, black, blue, galvanized, and full finished: Orders: New..-. short tons.. Unfilled, end of month short tons.., total... short tons.. Percent of capacity Shipments.. short tons,. Stocks, end of month, total short tons.. Unsold stocks short tons.. Tin and terneplate;* thous. of long tons.. Track work, production short tons-. MACHINERY AND APPARATUS METALS AND MANUFACTURES Continued 963,2,.97, ,79 6, , 28, , , ,355 5, j 787 ;, 68,36, , ,59 3 I ] i ,53 ' 5,85! ,6 2,67 226,29 2, 2,452! i , ,453 46,36 : 49,22,2 SI, 597 Air-conditioning equipment:t Orders, new. total thous. of dol. ),73,3,8 ) ) ) ) ) ) CO ) Air-washer group thous. of dol. ) 96 7! 35 : ( ) ) ) ) Fan group thous. of doh., ; ) ) ) 9,59 J, 336,54 Unit-heater group...thous. of dol.,4,2,5 ' 7 ; ,6,3 763 Electric overhead cranes; 6 S7 Orders: New._ thous. of dol. 94 : j Unfilled, end of month thous. of dol.,98, :,,94 i,7,676, 723 2,26 2,28 2, 2 2,64 2,242 2,85 Shipments thous. of dol. 53 ; Electrical equipment. (See Nonferrous metals.) Exports, machinery. (See Foreign Trade.) Foundry equipment: Orders: New , Unfilled, end of month = i Shipments =.., Fuel equipment: Oil burners:*}: Orders: New no. of burners.. 33,2 24, j 9, 553 7,7 7,2 I 7,39 9, 235,373 2, 578 5, 7 6, 22,2 34,8 Unfilled, end ofmonth.no. of burners.. 3,547 2, 8 j,,6, 7, 53 2, 34 2,3 2,739 4,78 3,4 4,224 4,92 Shipments no. of burners.. 33,557 25,7 5, , 436 7, 8,732,42 2, 24 4,449 7, 22 2,99 35, 25 Stocks, end of month no. of burners.. 4,2 2,47 4,3 5, 5 3,437! 4,57 5,9 6,9 8, 794 9, 22 2, ,578 6, 444 Pulverized-fuel equipment: Orders, new, storage system: Furnaces and kilns_.no. of pulverizers.. ; 2 Water-tube boilers-.no. of pulverizers.. Orders, new, unit system: Fire-tube boilers no. of pulverizers.. j Furnaces and kilns.no. of pulverizers.. S 9 i Water-tube boilers.no. of pulverizers Stokers, mechanical, new orders:^ 24 j Class, residential. 6, 54 3,78 2, 2,342 2, 376 3,547 4,38 8, 433 5, 4 Class 2, apartment and small commercial, ,777 I 4,287 2,5 5,4 Class 3, general commercial and small 6 I commercial heaters Class 4, large commercial: 268 I Number i Horsepower,5 5,3 3.i 34, , ; 27, ,2 24, Machine tools:* 43,8 36, 5 49, , 28 8, 268,6 Orders: New* avg. mo. shipments 926 = Pumps: Domestic, water, shipments:j Pitcher, hand, and windmill units.. 46,5 2,7 J 22,358 9, 4 39, 22 35, 4, 92 4,4 4, 259 5,4 59,27 54,2 46, 6 Power, horizontal type units..,272 ; ,229,98, 32,377 Measuring and dispensing, shipments: Gasoline: Hand-operated units Power units.. 8,2 5,49 4,785 4,9 I 4,57 3,992 5, 226 8,73 8,923 5,7 9, 325 8,9 9,39 Oil, grease, and other: Hand-operated units..,235 7,963 i 8, 5,678 4,4 9, 492 9,72,332 9,96,855 8,3 Power units.. 3,78! 699 5,9 I 9,259 4, 964 I,97, Comparable data not available.... See the regular monthly report of the Census Bureau for detailed data on this industry. Revised. * New series. For earlier data see p. 2 of the 2 issue for tin and terneplate and p. 2 of the July 4 issue for machine tools (including forging equipment). Current oil-burner series, available only back to 3, are based on reports from 6 concerns. t Revised series. Data on air-conditioning equipment revised starting 3; see footnote on p., April. The revisions for 3 will be shown in a subiequent issue, {Oil burners revised for 4 and, to exclude data erroneously reported. See p. 5 of the April issue. Data for 3 and 4 will be shown in a subsequent issue A Revised data on steel furniture shelving for years 2, 3, and 4 will be shown in a subsequent issue. «] Revised series on mechanical stokers, see p. of the April issue; domestic pumps starting 4, see p. 49 of the April issuei Series covering shipments and unfilled orders temporarily discontinued. Digitized for FRASER 685 5,52 98, ,69 94, i j J j ,5 j 38,79 9,34 3,354 23,38 299, ,7 68.9, 77 49, 23, 56 i , , , , 2,37 ~3~ 4" j" ~3~Q9Y~ ~3~25~ I" ~3~3~ I" 8,427 2, , 5,94 38, , 9,359.9,72 68, 572, ,7 964, , 787 3, 25, 28,4 27, , 673 4,96 7, 6 6, 25S 7 687,5, ,9 5,678 9, , 27, ,44 24, 239,7 7, ,54 9, , 257 9,3 9,5 27, 224, ,27 38,5 72,333 7,34,3,49,5,7, , 999 2, 26, , 55 2, , ,, 92 6,57,,9,5 98, , 324 9, , ,53 27, , 8S 4 72,63 6, 26,,36,57 996, ,999 8, 64 27, , 29 22, ,56 4,328 79,45 6,4,56,232,587,33, a 35,33 9, , , 6 23, ,285 37, 55 7,367 5,722

54 52 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March \ April May June July i August MACHINERY AND APPARATUS-Con. Pumps Continued. Steam, power, and centrifugal: Orders, new thous. of dol Water-softening apparatus, shipments!! units.., Water systems, shipments J units.. 2,3 Woodworking machinery: Orders: Canceled.....thous. of dol.. New thous. of dol.. 56 Unfilled, end of month. thous. of dol.. Shipments: Quantity machines.. 34 Value._.thous. of dol NONFERROUS METALS AND PRODUCTS Metals Aluminum: j Imports, bauxite# long tons..! 9,78 Price, scrap, cast (N. Y.) dol. per lb..i.222 Babbitt metal (white-base antifriction bearing metals): ^ thous. of lb 2,49 For own use thous. of lb._ 6 Salest thous. of lb._, 796 Copper: Exports, refined* short tons.. 27,9 Imports, total # short tons.. 9, 56 Ore and blister _ short tons... Price, electrolytic (N. Y.) dol. per lb._. 6 Lead: Ore: Receipts in U. S. ore short tons.. 3,9 Shipments, Joplin district...short tons.. 4, Refined: Imports#_ short tons.., 2 Price, pig, desilverized (N. Y.) dol. per lb.463 short tons.. 39,37 Shipments, reported short tons.. 59, 2 Stocks, end of month..short tons _, 43 Tin: Consumption in manufacture of tin and terneplate* long tons.. 3, 33 Deliveries long tons.. 6,5 Imports, bars, blocks, etc.# long tons.. 6,327 Price, Straits (N. Y.) dol. per lb Stocks, end of month: World, visible supply... long tons.. 4, 4 United States long tons 3,35 Zinc: Ore, Joplin district: Shipments short tons..! 46, 5 Stocks, end of month short tons..j 3,2 Price, slab, prime, western (St. Louis) dol. per lb._. 5, total (primary)f..short tons._ 46,297 Retorts in operation, end of mo 4, 733 Shipments* totalf short tons.. 54, 35 Domestic! short tons.. 54, 35 Stocks, refinery, end of monthf.short tons.. 68, 2 Electrical Equipment METALS AND MANUFACTURES Continued 8 8, I 373 6, ,294,643 2, 2 24,327 23,.7 27,7 3,6, ,4 42,27 225,39, 5,355 4,.52 3,425,3' ' 34, ,.4 36,76 34, , 63 47, 63,969 79, , ,3 63,5 25, 592 2,772 2,8. 3,42 7, , ,35 222, 636 2,2 4,35 4,7.5 5,49,472, , ,469 36,,72,72 85, , ,4 469,5 22,4 27, , , 6 8,639, , 8 42, , 36 2,35 5,36 6, ,7 2,32 4,9 2,.5 4,55 38, , 58 42,58 ', 8,39 4 9, , 44, [,37 3 i 42 i 58 j i 2! 3! I : Furnaces, electric, new orders kilowatts.. 2, 7,! 2,55,369 2,258 3, : 2,992 j 3,246 3,637 3,63! 2,2 I 4, Electrical goods, new orders^ (quarterly) thous. of dol-. 39, 2 i 53,452 9, 598 S9.5 Laminated phenolic products, shipments dollars..,5,292,6, ,4, 455 6, 3 4,3 j 924,238,4,258,45,69,35,858,4,35,,2,,77 Mica, manufactured: Orders, unfilled, end of month thous. of dol_ Shipments thous. of dol Motors (direct current): Billings (shipments) dollars-. 3,942 49, 2 57,6! 432, 533, 5 424,944 58, ,3 553, 523, 85, 547 G6.244 Orders, new dollars.. 445, 63 45,67 5, 78 I 454, 6, 4 585,3 594,79 63,37 68,37 598, 5 6, Panel boards and cabinets, shipments thous. of dol Porcelain, electrical, shipments: Special dollars.. 5,76,8, 238 7,698 i 8,4 78,94! 77, 69 92,637,436 94,437 I3,457 99, , 34 Standard dollars.. 45, S6 4, ,458 26, 53,858 29,923 27, , 228, 44,4! 34,732 35,99 43, 3 Power cables, shipments.. thous. of ft o ! j Power switching equipment, new orders: Indoor dollars-. 43,435! 46,328 j 64,69 4, ,63 57, 98 68,8 77,7 72,425 8,256 85, S, 96 Outdoor dollars.. 27,347 I 35,2 I 5,247 9,522 56,33 i, 24,25,63 43,8 23,6, , S3 2 Reflectors, industrial, sales.....-units.. 8, 77,2 87,8 \ 8, ,6 ;, 44,67,97 97,32, H2S Refrigerators, household, sales* 44, 38 43,76 46,,94 9,764 79,56 272,39 34, 329,4 237,37 25,98,9 S ; 5 Vacuum cleaners, shipments: Floor cleaners 9, 6,7 85, [,763 I,733,! 4, 4,559 5,2 8,649 7, 8!,S 4,944 Hand-type cleaners* 32, ,47 29,26 I 26,57 I 24,999 23,769 i 35, ,5 32, 22, 2 8,7 I 22, 39. US Revised. New series: For earlier data, see p. 2 of the 2 issue, for tin and terneplate; p. 2 of the July issue, electric relrigerators; and p. 2 of the August 4 Issue, for hand-type vacuum cleaners. tdata for Babbitt metal revised for the period 2- : see p. 2 of the July issue. For 3 revisions on zinc see p. 49 of the 4 issue; for 4 see p. 49 of the issue; for, see p. 52 of the issue. Present series on water systems cover 52 companies. For revisions for 2, see p. ol the June 3 issue; for 3, p. 2 of the 4 issue; for 4, p. 9 of the issue. Data for 2 revised; for 2 revisions, see p. of the June 3 issue, total imports of copper. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. Data for 3 revised; see p. 2 of the 4 issue. For 4 revisions, see p. 2 of the issue. ^Revised series on water systems starting 4; see p. 49 of the April issue; for earlier data on new orders for electrical goods, see p. 9 of the August 3 Issue. New series on water-softening apparatus revised starting 3; revisions for 3 will be shown in a subsequent issue. Digitized for FRASER 2,5 546,964 2, 573 4, 9 2,5. 29,464 3,.45 34, 34, ,3 2,3 6,635 6, ,338 2,985 35, 2 24,9.5 4,97 38, 25 46, ,468 79, 27 98, ,3! 2, I 453,4!, 9,33 I 7,438 6,723 I 6, , j 29,34 6,467! 4,55,,3, ,439 24,25 8, , I i ! 32, 33, i 36,3 225, i 223,3 2,44 549,8 6, 7, , 535 2, I.46 36, 4,457 22,99 2,4 : 2,35 j 2,85 5,6 i 5,52 6,235 6,525! 6,4 i 4, !.4799 i ,67 j 6, 3, 523 3, , 77 38, 64 25,3 26,.4 36, , 4 39, 98 39, 98, , 4 37, ,59 38,59 79, 3,328 2,73 4,6 28,7 I.49! 43, 252 4,4 42, 3 42, 3 8, 7,29,49,4,52 3,6 6, , ,32 42,8 9, 6 5, ! 445, j,33 5,6 i 6,! 4,4 \ 2 i 6 4 i ,43! 29,3. i. 2,3! 4 i,879 : ,67 3 i 494 ' 4, ,54 2, I,976 j,723 2,73! 24,249 7, 4, !.928 j.5 j 4 4, y ~~~3 3,547! 3,8 i 34,37 3,34 : 3.2 4,54 i 3,5 i 5, 3,8: 2,97 2,967!,27 I, , ,49 3,3 5,235 5, !.46 36,6 j 36,3 37,736 38, ,! 23, 8 3,52 7,7 8, ,967 I 4,26 2,94 3,54 4, 9 33, , 43, ,977 8,7 3,26 7,2 6, ,7 2,5 29,42 I 22,6 39,24 4, ,947 4, 7 4, 4 4,4 85, , 553 4, 38 4, 4, 2, , 7 46, 3SS 28, 233 3S , 7SS 5, 685 2, j ,385!,2 6,69! o, ,2! 3,587 3, I 2,8 35.8! ,8! 3,59. 43, 64 4, , 85, , S47 5, 7 7G. 63

55 Digitized for FRASER IG SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 53 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April May June July August METALS AND MANUFACTURES Continued NONFERROUS METALS AND PRODUCTS Continued Electrical Equipment Continued Vulcanized fiber: j Consumption thous. of lb_. I Shipments. thous. of dol-- i Welding sets, new orders:a. Multiple operator units-- Single operator... units.. Miscellaneous Products \ j j 2,3 579,68 Brass and bronze (ingots):! Shipments and deliveries net tons.-j 8, Brass, plumbing:! Shipments*! number of pieces ;,7 Brass sheets, wholesale price, mill! dol. per b.! Copper, wire cloth:! Orders: i New thous. of sq. ft. Unfilled, end of month.,thous. of sq. ft.. thous. of sq. ft... Shipments thous. of sq. ft.. Stocks, end of month thous. of sq. ft G ,7 59 7, 43! 2, , , ,294 j 5,944 : 5,4! 5,9! 5, ;. 46!. 46 i. 46! ,29! 47 I,73 I 2, i 5,7 6,2 j 5,7.46 I. '.5 2,6 4 5, 996,3,5 l,3, 96,7 lr 24,!,55,92,2,3,2,6 j,2,8,345,454,52, I : ; 396! 3 I 725! 6! 37 ; 528 I 4 i ! 46 i 6 I 6 ' j I I , , , ,85 57, 29 6, 379 6, 7,428,85,56,4.54 i S WOOD PULPJ Consumption and shipments short tons-_ G round wood. short tons.. 9,36 Sulphate.. short tons - 64, 27 Sulphite, total short tons.. 6, 56 Bleached short tons._ 96, 763 Unbleached short tons._ 63, 3 Soda short tons Damaged, off-auality & rnisc'l.short tons... 8, 9, all grades short tons.. Ground wood short tons. _ ~2, 3" Sulphate short tons._. 78 Sulphite, total..short tons B leached short tons - _, 9 Unbleached. short tons., 36 Soda. -. short tons - Damaged,ofl-quality & mlsc'l..short tons.. (327" Stocks short tons.. Groundwood... short tons Sulphate _. short tons-- Sulphite, total short tons.. Bleached-...- short tons.. Unbleached short tons.. Soda. short tons_. Darnaged, oil-quality &rnisc'l_.short tons.. Imports: Chemical, totalf#.. short tons.. Groundwood#...short tons.. Price, wholesale, sulphite, unbleached dol. per lb_. PAPER Total paper:f Paper, including newsprint and paperboard:. -short tons.. Paper, excluding newsprint and paperboard: Orders, new.. short tons._ 22, 2 4, 7 45, , 8, ,2 23, , 4 98,3 27, , 3 78, 4 57, 999 3, 4 8,7 3,33,67 26, , 78, , 9 3,22 8,77 97, 6 36,6 4,47 5, ,3 5, 28 4,5 228, 54 3,97 PAPER AND PRINTING 394, 5 98, 24, 34, 29 79, 55, 28 3, 256 7,42 3,785 94, 7 25, 69 32, 294,977 56, 37 29, 7 7, 9,9 32, 5, 49,236 32, 99 6,37 3,52 3,244 96,445 2, 87 35,37 78, 27 57, 29,399 6, 276 3, ,42 2, 3,9,236 55,739 28, 6,77 9, ,76 6,2 44, 4 29,8 4,6 2,924 6 I.9!.9 ; ,43 39, 29, , 52,49 32,99 7,78 49,946 6,794 39,329 34,29 79, 54,5 32, 38 7,52,343 3,36 5, ,735 32, 639 7,96 3,26 7 j.9 3, ,4 3, 29,5.7 77, 52, 343 3, 639 6, , 34, 5 3, , 78,5 5, 8 3, 9 6,34 m, ,524 6,3 49,28 33, 57 5, 6 3, ,2 i 243,858 i23,7 6, , 28,6 2,392 i 3, ,297 j 7,34 j 77,64.9,3 3,58 45,454 2,2 36,479 27,28 77, ,555 32,873 6, 79 47,9,57 36,76 33,43 8, 9 52, 394 3,794 6,878 6, 9 4,479 6,44 55,8 36,5 8, 7. 2,477 4,85 i 398,39 ; 369,7 45,268 4,523 Produetionf... short tons_. 4,727 4,96 i 398,4 469,36 4,225 Shipmentst - short tons.. 4,855 : 4,434! 3,72 472, 4,525 Revised. Since April figures are not as complete as during the period of the operation of the Code Authority. 443, 272, 36, 76 54, 3 98, 79 55,59 34, 7 6, 44, 9 2,54 37,792 42, 459 9,4 5,985 35,4 6,492 4, 5, 727 7,47 43,239 28, 276 4,963 2, ,576 22,6 2,457 3,.9 437, 97 2,8,433 38,54,9 53,594 3,9 6, 45,. 26 2,427,47 42, 9 9,2 52, 4 32,2 6, I 7,9 58,396 7,85! 47,4! 49,4 33,63 j 34, 26 3,9! 4, 4 3,49 3, , 2, , 358, 47, 32 38,, 494 5, 67 3, ,5, 339, ,23 3,' ', , 7,92 235,29 4, , 449 5, , ,85 87, 94 5, 8 3, 355 6,73 4,296 97, ,9 37,24 85, 9 5,256 3,687 6,57 7,5, 8,232 46, , 34 4,225 3, 9 29 *445, 49 *4, 8 55, 444, 638 9, 27 «53, 42 33, 72 7,7 2 43S, "9,925 55,327! 5, 5 47,587 4, 333 «9, 2, 3 56, 35 55, 43 33, 3 34,76 7, 6, 98 a 38, , 28 8, 3 6, 23 " 49,478 a 45, 7 32, , 5 7, 9! 4,99! 2 4, 7 53, 44, 64, 77 55, 4 33, 79 27, ,32! 28, 3 25,8 9,85 28,. 6, 4, ,47 j 7,! 798,6 i 797,6 6,434 "3,38 3,9 453,9 44, 43,778 5,28 45,8 496, , 5,6 I 424, 28 46,228 j 4,4 j 428, ,2 429,324 4,4 "439,39 442,472 45,56 I,56!«426,7 447,46 Figures for period 4-April would be fairly comparable if reduced by about 5 percent. A These series have covered a varying number of companies for period covered in survev; percentage of industry coverage not known. Reports have been from 2 companies since 4. tin 3 firms discontinued reporting; data of 3 firms of equal size were added, thereby maintaining the comparability of the series. t Revised series. See p. 49 of the June 3 issue for 2 chemical wood pulp imports. Data on total paper for 4,, and revised. Revisions for 4 and months of not shown above will appear in a subsequent issue. * New series. Data prior to not published on plumbing brass, # See footnote on p. 37, of this issue. Date for 3 revised; see p. 2 of the 4 issue. For 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issua. The figures on paper (including total, fine, and wrapping) are as reported by the American Paper and Pulp Association, except book paper, the data on which are reported by the Book Paper Division of the Paper and Pulp Industry; they are not comparablt with the data carried in the SURVEY from the American Paper and Pulp Assotiatinn through 3. The present classification of the association differs from that previously used by them, as well as from the Bureau of tho Census classification In addition to the classes shown, the association also reports on printing paper (including uncoated book), boards, paperboard, and newsprint. The first two of these classifications are not used in the SURVEY, while the Bureau of the Census report is used for paperboard and the Newsprint Service Bureau's report for newsprint (the latter series is Identical with that reported by the association). The ratio of the production reported by the association, the Newsprint Service Bureau, and the Bureau of the Census (monthly report on paperboard) to the annual figures reported by the Bureau of the Census for 4 follow: Total paper, 87.4 percent; fine paper, 76. percent; wrapping, 9.7 percent (present classification of association is much broader than is Census or earlier association classification); paperboard, 68 percent of all paperboard, bur. 8 percent of the more comparable classifications of container board and boxboard; book paper, uncoated, percent and coated percent (book paper estimates are by association since the data cannot be checked with Census data); and newsprint, 97 percent. Figures for the first 5 months of 4 on book paper are not available. Data are available for the other series for the months of to April 4. These figures will be shown in a subsequent issue. See footnote marked "A" on p. 6 of the March issue,

56 Digitized for FRASER 54 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS >er Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Novem- Decem ber ber March April May June PAPER Continued Book paper:* Coated paper: Orders, new short tons.. Orders, unfilled short tons.. _ short tons.. Percent of potential capacity.. Shipments short tons.. Stocks, end of month short tons. Uncoated paper: Orders, new short tons. Orders, unfilled _ short tons.. short tons... Percent of potential capacity Shipments short tons.. Stocks, end of month. short tons.. Fine paper:* Orders, new short tons.. Orders, unfilled...short tons...short tons. Shipments short tons. Stocks, end of month.. short tons. Wrapping paper:* Orders, new short tons. Orders, unfilled short tons. _ short tons. Shipments short tons. Stocks, end of month Newsprint: Canada: Exports short tons. short tons..short tons.. Shipments from mills short tons. Stocks, at mills, end of month short tons. United States: Consumption by publishers short tons. Imports # - short tons. Price, rolls, contract, destination, N. Y. base dol. per short ton., total short tons. Shipments from mills.short tons. Stocks, end of month: At mills...short tons. At publishers short tons. In transit to pub ishers short tons. Paperboard: Consumption, waste paperf..short tons. 2, 554 6,634 22, , 2, 334,43 34, 27 3,47.5, 6, 724 i 28,733 I 3,! 37,25 59,5 23,98 26, ,27 8, , 9^7 5, 69 -j 37, Orders: New.._ short tons. 3, 687 Unfilled, end of month.short tons. 38, short tons. 359, Percent of capacity i.8 Stocks of waste paper, end of month: At millst--- short tons.,59 In transit, and unshipped purchases short tons.! o) PAPER PRODUCTS Abrasive paper and cloth, shipments: Domestic...reams.. 85, 4 Foreign..-_ reams.. 9,377 Paperboard shipping boxes: Shipments, total.. mills, of sq. ft.. Corrugated* mills, of sq. ft.. Solid fiber*. mills, of sq. ft.. PRINTING Blank forms, new orders thous. of sets.. Book publication, total-number of editions.. New books number of editions.. New editions number of editions.. Operations (productive capacity). 923= Sales books: Orders, newf (thous. of books).. 2, ' 258 PAPER AND PRINTING Continued 9,92 7,924 2,97. 2, 728 6,64, ,77,4 72.4! 92,45, 37,763 8,6 39, 38,9 56, 54,47 79,5 76, 973, 9 7, 5 24,42 2,55 2, 679 9, ,! 58. ; 2,6 6,58 ; 87, 252 i 35. :,2!.4 9,97 :,399 I I 29,! 8,245! 3,28 ' 3, 79 56,7 7,352, 43 8, ; 63.7 i 9,45 : 4,96 ;,8 ' 98,8,96 37,6 j 4,22 43, 739 9, j,223 : 96, i 7.8 i 73.9,964 99,769 96, 2 79,58 8, 8,73 29,92 8,857 3,633 28,355 6,26 34,343 25, 29 73,7 7,3 38,523 i3,544 4,6 27,5 5,468 i 8,78 244,37 2, ,79 277,8 244,732 2, , 352,35 23, ,64 : 6, , 5,56 4,979 43,467 59, ,4, ,44,4 227,5 8,43 22,54 :,364 2, ,2 5,5 36, 999 2, 38,55 34., 4 25, , , S2, ,9 26, 3,96 7,34 < 24,697! 76. ; 25,998 } 2,528 i 28,92 j 85, 5,58! 49,9, 9 7, ,6 5,6 73, ,33 39, 6,2 33, , 435 6,4 8,6,336 23, ,734,992 44, 6,69 47,99 45,9 6, 545 7,97 9,6 2, ,38 2, 72, 37, , , 57, 28 3,922 3,94 35, 56 33, 559, 5 33,5, 77, : 77,344 32,7 ;,537 5,3 73,32 4, '<,543 44, 232 4, 8,269 4,92,52 8,28 9, ,497 2, ,33 35, ,7 is, t)4 3,4 2,2 3,", b 4, bb."> 72, JO, olg 3, ,4 j 258,2 : 2n% o^i 242,9 ' 258,72 267,67 j , ,296 2,445 2b2.Gbi 73,579! 5,9 i 3,38 : 76, ,254 85,9,24! , I 87,4!,54 222,8 234,35! 249, I 4. j 4. 79,9 I 78,5 i,, 22 ; 8,5 ' 79,672 4, , 3 34, 4 2,473 ; ,8 4l!727 53,32 6,85 79, ,336,26 4,2 237,5 35, , 249 7, 6,32 22,5 39, 387 S3, , 4S2 lb, 63 23, 4. 85,399 23, ,54 77, 7,87,453, , 26 2, 58 4., 79 77, 273 5,96 9, , 2,8 i 246,38 i 96,429! 229,64 ' 226,26 237,6 245,5 j 24,8 35,7! 272,477 : 234, ,3 29, ,8 7, i,67 8, 4 94,2 9,97 96, 22 99, , ,29 243,594 27,928 27,7 2bo , ] ,685 23,297 2,29 26, ,376 24,353 4,78 ; 35, 44 35, , 9 3S , 36 73, 57 9, 2,42 2, 247, , 53,453! 55, 9,428, 5,23,99,796 94, ,78, ,3 6 6, 7 7,72,964, 768, , 45 4, 5 9, 769.6,3 94. S ,9,, ,785! 5,5 f 4,9 3,33 5,778 77,56, 24 2,, , ,3 2J2, * ^2, S.3* 2.J7 9^,4 4 4,::.' 28,9! 29. 9S 92,7 I 9,42 2,527 I 28^, 7. I ,435 I 28,33 ) i ; 9, 64 7, 4 2, ,876 6,7 2f, ,5 2,878,7 33, 58, SO, 4 8,58 6s78 ; 2,3 : 69.4 : 2,387, 3,2 37, 73, 6, ~'i(, I,t*4 rz/'r 8, 8 7,47 9, ,9 2, s 9,452 33) i 34, 28, 9, , 94,4 os, 9~ 9.58 j Gf. jj7 7, SI'. *,43-., I 77,Uw lo},5 ' 7,4- ««7,5S6 4, 9 "b '- '23 3, 8 9, HI bol ") HO, 87* ]")l. 7 2,72 2<- (CO I '.: r-tt 27V36S J f,'j7 27, IT -'.4 27b,. 2«.7,6 r 4V r :M tr.9*9 i7o, 4.o\l-'.8 25,7 Jio >«' " ') r>[vj, ^'7 ' A, /-i ''.9 JlO.7'7, 7 24,6 24,2 I."*, 7~ 2b,4 76, 9, , , 'si 7, 5 l'»x. "'7 7,443 J.I,7.3J 2<J<>, 33 j?9,,9l 32S, 59-7 ' 7C 7 79 C'f* 2 jn: «v,,4 Of. 79 7, ,76 2,69S 2,3 ' i(k 6S3 ) 79, , I 7 42 : 73 ' Revised. trevised series. Data for period 3-, inclusive, on consumption anl stocks of waste paper at mills will be shown in a subsequent issue. Sales books, new orders, have been revised beginning to include the statistics of 2 members not included heretofore. The data now represent 9 percent of all the sales books sold in the United States. For revisions see p. 54 ot the May issue. Discontinued by reporting source. The Bureau of the Census has changed the title of the "Boxboard" report to "Paperboard" since data actually cover all board of.2 of an inch or more m thickness reported by the cooperating manufacturers. Figures given on production and new and unfilled orders are for 9 identical manufacturers; and consumption and stocks of waste paper for manufacturers. Estimated coverage is given in footnote marked on p. 53 New series. New series on paperboard shipping boxes compiled by the National Container Association, Chicago,., from reports from all members of the industry of record beginning in 4. The volume of companies not reporting each month is estimated by the association, so as to keep the series comparable. Prior to 4 data covering this industry were compiled by the Paper Board Industries Association. See footnote marked " " on p. 53 of this issue for book, fine, and wrapping paper. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue; data for 3 revised; see p. 2 of the 4 issue. For 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issue. 6 92

57 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS oo Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey RUBBER AND RUBBER PRODUCTS March April May June July j August Novem- Decem- Sejteni t<6 CBUDE AND SCEAP RUBBEft Crude: Consumption, total long tons. For tires and tubesjt long tons. Imports, total, including latext#-long tons- Price, wholesale, smoked sheets, N. Y. dol. per lb. Shipments, world...long tons. Stocks, world, end of montht long tons. Afloat, totalt--- -long tons. To United Statest long tons. London and Liverpool -long tons. British Malaya long tons. United Statest - long tons. Reclaimed rubber: Consumption long tons. long tons. Stocks, end of month long tons. 8crap rubber: Consumption by reclaimers long tons. TIRES AND TUBES: Pneumatic casings: thousands. Shipments, total thousands. Domestic thousands. Stocks, end of month.thousands. Solid and cushion tires:.thousands- Shipments, total -thousands- Domestic..thousands. Stocks, end of month thousands. Inner tubes:.thousands. Shipments, total...thousands. Domestic thousands. Stocks, end of month thousands. Raw material consumed: Crude rubber. (See Crude rubber.) Fabrics thous. of lb_ MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS j, 59 4,9. 77, 4, 2, 67,5 96, 5 6, 25, 5, 85 4, 737 5, ,92 b 23, 7 36, , 5,, 49, 68, 57 7, 8 32,2 7,923,926, 7 b 3, 28 > 3, 37 > 3, 258 * 6, 4, 38,5 * 22, 26, , 3, 3, 46, 5, 6, ,6 7,494,4 2, 28 * 3, 238» 3,232» 3,7 * 6,6 b 9 * 4 b 3, 592 b 3, b 3, 2 6 3, 35 fc 3, 25 * 2,9S8» 6, 523 * 6,6 b 3,523 38, 6 * 23,98 39,.32, 6,987, 39,94 64, 2 6,692 33, 6,87 2, 37 3, ,772 k 3, 2 b 3,3» 3,3 b 6,639 * 23 Ml» 3, 279 *> 3, 268 b 3, 229 > 6, 7 43,5 " 27,437 33,92.44, 6,479, 43, 87,7,68 287,4 8,3,6 4,326 k 3, 79 b 3,39 * 3,79 * 7, 224 «< M 33,7 *> 2,464 34, , 599,355 85, 46,532 57,28 72,53 2,797 5,8, 5, ,433 46,77 * 2,372 b 28, 6 34,8 i 45,.59 68, 5, 594 9, 58,5 47,72 6,45 2,7.59 6, 558, 5, 47, 678 4, 44, ,9 7,4 i 8,2,72 i,3 6,39 j 6, 28,994 ' b 2, 8 b 2, 947 i h 3, 2 6 2,6! b 3,23 *>3,97 b 2,545 j h 3f j b 3,97 b 7,54 b 7,36! * 7, j M6 b 33 fc 7 * 2! h j» 2! "32 it I, i b 3, 79 h 2, i «> 3, 68! 3, 9S ^3,376! >2,79 j &3.! *>3,4 t-3,33! 2,8 i & ,792 >6,9 i»7,46 fc 7,4! * 7,8 & 3, 632! b 5,9 & 2,59 : 43,47 b 6, 57 45, 434 b 29, 58 37, , 3 533,4, I, I 3,599! 59, 8 253,5 8,37,52 5, 9 47,372! 45,72 b 3, 96 j b 3, 38,273 I 26,45.59!.,7 i, 73 5, j , i 6, 47,228! 6, ,285 «3,3,426 i 63,8 237,22 i 227,649 9,238! 9,453,5 i 2,33 4, 925 i J ,33 I. b 4, 27! b 4, 544 t 4, 427 b 4, 724 M, 692 : t 4, 3 *> 4, 9 h 4, 6! b 4, 599 b 6,3! b,345 i & 6.2 t-3 b 3, * 3,9 3, fc 4,78. b 4, 458 h 4, 4 > 39 & & 4,94 i 4, 6G4 & 4, 49 7, 63! *, 5 «fi, , 257 4c.. 4u3 *> 29, 7 4, 7 5i), OS*.63 72, 492, , 63, 597 8,25 63,38 222, 8,794 ' 2,856 i 4,!, b 4, 3 : t 3,978 j 633 fc 34 i & 28 4, 8 b 4, (3 * 4, 25 b G> 72 7,99 i ''5,494 \ MS, 2: j '7, , 5, 6 96,, 24 3,9 6, "^ JL, 7 b\ Obi 72K Rubber bands, shipmentsa thous. of Ib._ 39 Rubber-proofed fabrics, production, totala thous. of yd_. Atito fabrics thous. of yd j 533 Raincoat fabrics...thous. of yd..i Rubberflooring,shipmentsA-thous.ofsq.ft-J 3$S Rubber and canvas footwear: j, total.thous. of pairs.. 9, Tennis thous. of pairs..,28 Waterproof thous. of pairs..! 5,47 Shipments, total thous. of pairs..! 7,7 Tennis. thous. of pairs... 7 Waterproof..thous. of pairs.., 7,2 Shipments, domestic, total.thous. of pairs..j 7,4 Tennis.thous. of pairs..! Waterproof thous. of pairs..! 7, Stocks, total, end of month-thous. of pairs... I 3,43 Tennis thous. of pairs., j 3,78 Waterproof thous. of pairs.. 9, 5 Rubber heels:a... thous. of pairs.. (i) Shipments, total*. thous. of pairs.. () Export thous. of pairs.. () Repair trade thous. of pairs.. (i) Shoe manufacturers thous. of pairs._ (i) Stocks, end of month thous. of pairs..! () Rubber soles:a thous. of pairs.. ) Shipments, total* thous. of pairs.. ) Export.thous. of pairs.. ( Repair trade thous. of pairs.. ( l ) Shoe manufacturers thous. of pairs.. ) Stocks, end of month. thous. of pairs.. ) Mechanical rubber goods, shipments:a Total thous. of dol. (i) Belting...thous. of dol..j () Hose.thous. of dol.i () Other.thous. of dol.j () 334 5, , ,8,297 4,577 5, ,59 5, 4 5,5 4, 7 4,76 9,9 8,57 8, 296 5,29 3,4 36, 29 4,22 4,4 5 3,55 3,73 5,5,55,438 2, , 269 3, ,72,3 3,87 5,7 49 5, 5, ,59 4, 2 5,57 8,63 6, 24 6, ,73 2, 285 3, 7 3,399 I 3, ,25 3,2 4, 5 9,39 2, , ,9, 4,332 6,276 5,446 6, ,437 4,967 6,3 8,224 6,649 7, ,9 3,97 3, 3 3,698 3, ,42 3,64 5,2,27, 2, , ,925 2, 3, 6,44 2,6 4, 6.9 2,42 4,67 4,6 6,9 8,47 ) ( ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) 26 2, ,498 2,732 4,, ,7, 2, 873 4,7 7,35 7,2 ) ) ) ) 8 ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ( ) ) 236 i 3,467 ; 99!,2 I 422! i 5,! 2,7! 2,969! 5,4 I 3,9 s 2,22 j 5,! 2,997 2,4 5, 7, ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ( ) ( ) ) ) ) 2 4,34 2, , 876 2,8 2,9 4,97 3, 59,45 4,928 3,,447 6, 699 6, 5,34 ) ) ) ) ) ) ( ) ) ) ) ) ) ( 3, 6 244, ,227! 2,58 i 3,7! 4,429! 3,333 I,96! 4,399 3,39, 9 7,497 5, 2 2, 28 ) ) ) ) ( ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) 29 3, 7S2 256, 42 4bb I 2,8 3, 64 4, 334 2,79 :,543 4,29 2, '.539 8, 2 4,59 : 4, 33 ) i ) i ) i! ) () ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) (I) S3 4,67.244?>, 327 \ , , 8 3,39 7, 9 3,729 4, 233 (v ISO 4, 5^4 37,2 i 64 5, 5,377 4,22,877 i,443 5, 435 i 6,85 ;, '< G^ 6 ; 3, 3, : ) ) ) ) ; ) ) ) ) ) ) C ) ) \ Of.,-..: i Discontinued by reporting source. k See footnote marked ' tdata for 4 and for the period to July are estimated to represent approximately 97 percent of the industry; for subsequent months the coverage is estimated to be 8 percent. Previously published data are estimated to cover about 8 percent of the industry for , inclusive, and 7 to 8 percent prior to 928. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue. Data for 3 revised. See p. 2 of the 4 issue. For 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issue. In 3, 4 new companies were included in the report and additional company in 4. Since that month, the coverage of the industry is percent. For preceding periods the coverage varied; in 929 it was 9 percent; in, 8 percent; and in 3, percent, according to the Census of Manufactures. Overlapping figures are available for 3. See the 4 issue for 3 data for the smaller number of firms. New series. Earlier data not published on total shipments of rubber heels and rubber soles prior to 2. frevised series. Data on consumption of rubber for tires and tubes revised for 2,3, and 4. See p. 5 of the August 4 issue. Revised data from - 4 rubber world stocks, world afloat, and afloat to the United States appear on p. 2 of the July issue; for 2 revisions for United States stocksr set p. 6 of the May 3 issue. See p. 5 of the June 3 issue for crude rubber imports. ACoverages of Rubber Association data has varied considerably over period for which data have been shown in SURVEY. Coverage was generally higher in 524 Lid than in earlier years.

58 Digitized for FRASER 56 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, together with explanatory footnotes and refer- ences ~, In the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Ortohflr ' Novem- Decem- UctDer ber ber I March April May June July August P BRICK Common brick: Price, wholesale, red, N. Y. dol. per thous. _ Shipments* thous. of brick.. Stocks* thous. of brick- Face brick (average per plant): Orders, unfilled, end of mo ṫhous. of brick.. (machine)* thous. of brick.. Shipments thous. of brick.. Stocks, end of month* thous. of brick. _ Sand-lime brick: Orders, unfilled, end of mo ṫhous. of brick.. thous. of brick.. Shipments by rail..... thous. of brick.. Shipments by truck.thous. of brick.. Stocks, end of month -thous. of brick.. Vitrified paving brick: Shipments* thous. of brick.. Stocks* thous. of brick.. PORTLAND CEMENT Price, wholesale, composite dol. per bbl_. thous. of bbl-., Percent of capacity -.. Shipments...thous. of bbl. Stocks, finished, end of month.thous. of bbl.. Stocks, clinker, end of month.thous. of bbl.. GLASSWARE, ETC. Glass containers:# thous. of gross.. Percent of capacity Shipments thous. of gross.. Stocks, end of month...thous. of gross.. Illuminating glassware:* Orders: New and contract number of turns.. Unfilled, end of month number of turns number of turns.. Shipments: Total number of turns.. Percent of full operation Stocks, end of month... number of turns.. Plate glass, polished, production! thous. of sq. ft.. GYPSUM* Crude (quarterly): Imports... _..short tons....short tons.. Shipments (uncalcined) short tons.. Calcined (quarterly): short tons.. Calcined products (quarterly): Shipments: Board, plaster (and lath)..thous. of sq. ft.. Board, wall. thous. of sq. ft.. Cement, Keenes short tons.. Plasters, neat, wood fiber, sanded, gauging, finish, etc..short tons.. For pottery, terra cotta, plate glass, mixing plants, etc short tons.. Tile, partition thous. of sq. ft.. Orders, new: Quantity Value TERRA COTTA Hollow building tile:* Shipments Stocks TILE -.short tons., j thous. of dol.. short tons.. short tons.. STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.5 ) ( C) ).7 2, , 8,9 4, 2 4, , 3 6,8 2, ,3 423, 39 2,5 29,927 2,64 5,454 79, 3.7 7, ,794 2, 5 5, 3, 6.8 3,569 7,6 2, 68 2, 2, , , , 5 424,737 I 426, i 354 I 3! 322 \ 3 i 235 I 2,223 2,334! 4!,399,28 2,85 6,78 79, , ,976 2,63 5,67 5 I 39 i 47 2,5,225, , ,47 44,736 47, 4 45, ,385, ,46 4, 3, 2 2,52 8,9 79, 73 79, , 25.6 I 4,54 22,98 i 5,226 3,27! 3, j ,8 I 2,537 7,6! 8,328 I.7 3, ,9 22,6 5,24 3, ,96 8,437 2,5 i 2,46!,87 2,26 2,73 i 2,672 I 2,339! 9. j 3,68 j 2,477 2,292 2, ,735 6,5 I 5,99 6,2, ,3 329, 4, ,69 335,4.! 24,32.j 498,7 _j 4,363 J 345,6.;, i,6 5,76 235, 2,9 2,59, ,3 7, I 2,477 7,9,32 29,85 2, , ,56 22,97 5,59 3, i 3,3! 8,4 :,853,3 2,, ,45 3, , ) ) ) ) 7,928 2,22 2,29,6 4,856 79,.7 5, ,38 2, 26 5, 5 3, ,434 8,27 2,,94,8,.5 3,7 34, I... I 38,4 2,42..._! I 2,76,59 79,96 2 3,36 j 28, 337,4 I 33,2, , , 79 ) ) ) ),3,449 43,6,3 7,858 76, , , 2, 57 5, 328 3, , 64 S.224 2,38!.5 7, 335,768 ) ) ) ),38 2, ,63, 8,972, 447.7, 985.9,2 2, 43 5,7 3, ,996 7,942 2,9 2, I 2,39 2,85 j 2 27.*9 3, ,2 368, 638 ( ) ) ) 2,945 3, ,235,34,476 7, ,47 9, 28 4,92 3, ,999 7, , , 87 ) ) ) ( 2, 3, ,6,,92 68, 38. 7, ,7 8, 9 5, 79 3, ,79 7,S 2, I 2,355 2,356 2, ,4 6,57 9,455 j 9,92 2,2! 2,7 i 2,25 I 87.6 I 4,9 6,244 8,98 I! i 63, ,8 i 727,729, ,33 3, 4 559,247 57,! I 5,44 6,36 5,768 i! I 96,22! 9,676 i i! 25,353! 368,638, ,2,33 327,2 38,59,945 25, , 252 3, 9, ,536 78,7,45 3,2 32,4 I 3, 2,4 2, 38, 996 4,35 6, !.5 '72,8 73,576 '47,, 267 ( ) ( (,54 3,92 2 3,377,9 ) ) ) ), ^ 7 2, 99,5 8, 724, 8 7,6S3 7,5.7 2, , 56 8,92 4, 4,43 ; 77. I 4,346 j 7,422 ; 2, , ,23, G67 2, , 564 "8,738 a 4, 8 3, , 345 7,5 2,594! 2,9 2, 7 2,59 2, G ,56 8,7 9,553, , 52 ",6, ,998 33,43 39,96 a l Revised. Discontinued by reporting source. *New series. Earlier data not published on illuminating glassware prior to July 2 (except production and percent of capacity); for earlier data see p. 2 of the June 3 issue, face brick, machine production. Series on common and vitrified paving brick and tile beginning 4 were shown on p. 2 of the June issue. For earlier data on gypsum see p. 2 of the 3 issue. {Adjusted for degrading and year-end physical inventories. tdata on plate glass represent the total output of the industry. Complete figures for the months of 2 were shown on p. 52 of the March 3 issue, foi 3 on p. 52 of the March 4 issue, and for 4 revisions p. 56 of the March issue. #Monthly series on glass containers for 4 and are not comparable with those of earlier years due to increase of number of firms reporting to 44. Shipments of the 44 firms for the year of 3 amounted to 33,,7, compared with 23,63,5 for the 3 firms reporting for the same year. Comparable statistics on shipments for the companies, now reporting by years, from 928 to 3, inclusive, were as follows (in gross): 928, 3,943,6; 929, 33,7,6;, 3,,3;, 3,43,58; 2, 26,947,949; and 3, 33,,7. Data are not available for this period on production and stocks, nor are monthly figures on shipments available. It may be noted from the trend of these data that the monthly figures prior to 4 had a downward bias. Basis of estimating capacity was changed in computing the new series. Data for 4 revised: see p. 52 of the May issue; for revisions see p. 56 of the June issue.

59 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 57 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April May June July j August Se^m TEXTILE PRODUCTS CLOTHING Hosiery:* thous. of dozen pairs.. Shipments _.-thous. of dozen pairs.. Stocks, end of month thous. of dozen pairs.. COTTON Consumption! - thous. of bales.. Exports: Quantity, exclusive of linters thous. of bales.. Ginnings (total crop to end of month) thous. of bales.. Imports^. thous. of bales.. Prices: To producer... dol. per lb_. Wholesale, middling, N. Y dol. per lb, crop estimate...thous. of bales.. Receipts into sighti thous. of bales.. Stocks, end of month:f Domestic, total mills and warehouses thous. of bales.. Mills thous. of bales.. Warehouses thous. of bales.. World visible supply, total..thous. of bales.. American cotton thous. of bales.. COTTON MANUFACTURES Cotton yarn: Prices, wholesale: 22/ls, cones (Boston) 4/ls, southern spinning* Cotton goods: Cotton cloth: Exports Importst# Prices, wholesale: dol. per lb... dol. per lb thous. of sq. yd.. thous. of sq. yd.. Print cloth, 64 x 6 dol. per yd.. Sheeting, brown, 4x4 (Trion mill) dol. per yd Cotton cloth finishing:* : 646 9, ,4 3,4 9,43,43 8,28 7,679 5, ,359 8, Bleached, plain._ thous. of yd-. 2,49 Dyed, colors thous. of yd.. 5,698 Dyed, black.. thous. of yd.. 5, Printed -thous. of yd.., Stocks:* Bleached and dyed thous. of yd-., 77 Printed- thous. of yd 8, 329 Spindle activity:! Active spindles thousands.. 23,638 Active spindle hours, total millions of hours. 8,328 Average per spindle in place hours Operations percent of capacity., j 23. 3, 5 2,64 7, ,4.9.2 I, 2,23 7,39 52,35 9, ,45 I 2,35 I 9,56 9,978,78,349 8,4 8,9 7,6 7,697 5,87 6,3.32 j. I 5,529 5, ,5 2, 6,499 97,972 99, 328, ,5 6,.64. 2, , 57 5,399 97, 33 25, 79, 79 23,28 23, 94 7,437! 6,8 25 I j. 8,98 8,6 7,547 5 b 9, /, 638,332 9,,43 8,3 7, , 4 4,9.64.,3, 239 3,969 4, 72 23, 494 7,3,99 8,7 9, <, ,28,436 7,5 7,59 5, j.45 I 5,4 9, ,435 87,685 4,554, ,7 5,464 23,399 23,323 6, , ,252 8,6 9, ""8" ,3,45 7,2 7,385 5, ,392 8, ,2, 42 9, , ,97,337 6,57 6,5 4, , 5 2, 36, 2, 76 9, "l3~ ,79,9 5,99 6,54 4, , 685 9,6 9,27 9,379 9, , 7 2, I 6, 329,9 5,239 6,25 4, 2.27!.385 I , !.373 9,9 9,322 2, 9.26 I , 4 7 3, , , 6,3 8, 527 8,68 4,4 4,.55! ,87! 7,8 9,39 (,739 4, ,,2 98,58 3,79 23,3, , 6 23, 6, 735 7, ! ,7 I 5, 3, , 345 4,87 4, 364 9,,58 87,333, 2 23,9 7, ,6 3,49 22, 3 6, , 63 9, 398 4,6 9, 338,24 5, 7,, 56,8 2,7 9, I 8,64, , 2 4,337 4,8 2, , '2,8 9 6, 6, 378 4, ,42 I 4,387 5, j 7, ,94 I 4,7 j ,,6!,42 6, 357 7,69 6,42 9., 273 9, 57, 54 I 35,5 54, 264 7,34 94, 557, 85, ,2 23,252 I 23,434 \ , 32 i 7, 855 I 7, 573 j S, OSS I 27 2.!.8! 5.8! 25.8 RAYON AND SILK Rayon: j Deliveries:* I Unadjusted I Adjusted =-! ! mo. moving average of adjusted index = Importstl thous. of lb_ J, , 242 I 2,44 2,72 Price, wholesale, 5 denier, "A" grade I (N. Y.) dol. per Ib Stocks, imported, end of month thous. of lb Silk: Deliveries (consumption)..bales.. 43,,67 37, ,9 32,53 36,! 34, , Imports, rawt# thous. of lb_. 6,3 8,28 6,6 6,3 6,2 5,58 3, 4, , , 9 Prices, wholesale: Raw, Japanese, 3-5, N. Y_dol. per lb._ ! Silk goods, composite dol. per yd )... ) ) ( ) ) ) ) Stocks, end of month: ) ) World visible supply* bales.. 53, 5,77 85, 8 94,94,9, 38, 6 58, , 2 32, 69 42,439 5,25,253 United States (warehouses) bales.. 3, 3 46, 777 5, ,94 56,5 64, 68 53, 6 46,98 4, 35, 49 3, 39 29, 5 29, 553 «Revised. b As of Dec. 3. c As of Nov.. d As of Jan. 6. / Final estimate.» Discontinued by reporting source. *New series. Hosiery compiled by the National Association of Hosiery Manufacturers and estimated to represent percent of the industry. For complete series see p. 9 of the issue. Data on cotton cloth finishing are from the National Association of Finishers of Textile Fabrics and cover practically all the industry, comparable figures are not available prior to 3; the production statistics are prorated from data for 4-week periods; stocks are reported at end of each 4-week period. Data on cotton yarn, southern spinning from 3-April 4 will be shown in a subsequent issue. Rayon deliveries from 923-April were shown on p. 9 of the June issue; these data are compiled by Rayon Organon. New series on world visible supply of silk. For monthly data from 922-June, see the July issue, p. 2. f For revisions for crop years -32, 2-33, 3-34, 4-35, and -36, see p. 52 of the 3 issue, p. 52 of the 3 issue, p. 53 of the 4 issue, p. 57 of the issue, and p. 57 of the issue, respectively. ffor revisions of cotton consumption, domestic stocks, and spindle activity for crop years -32, 2-33, 3-34, 4-35, and -36, see p. 2 of the 3 issue, pp. 52 and 53 of the 3 issue, p. 53 of the 4 issue, p. 57 of the issue, and p. 57 of the issue, respectively. For 2 revisions see p. 53 of the June 3 issue; for 3 revisions see p. 2 of the 4 issue; 4 revisions are shown on p. 9 of the issue. #See footnote on p. 37 of this issue Data revised for 3; see p. 2 of the 4 issue; data also revised for 4, see p. 2 of the issue. Stocks at end of 4-week periods through June 6. July figures are averages for July 4 and Aug.. August figure as of Sept. 8. Subsequent data at the end of ucceeding 4-week periods. JFor 2 revisions see p. 63 of the June 3 issue, for 3 revisions see p. 2 of the 4 issue, and for 4 revisions see p. 2 of the issue.

60 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through, together with explanatory footnotes and referaaces In *.he 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey March April May June July August ^ TEXTILE PRODUCTS Continued WOOL Consumption: Total, grease equivalent basis}: thous. of lb Apparel class, scoured basis*..thous. of lb Imports, unmanufactured^ thous. of lb_. Operations, machinery activity:^ Combs, worsted percent of capacity.. Looms: Carpet and rug percent of capacity.. Narrow percent of capacity.. Wide _ percent of capacity.. Spinning spindles: Woolen percent of capacity.. Worsted percent of capacity.. Prices, wholesale: Raw, territory, fine, scoured...dol. per lb._ Raw, Ohio and Penn., fleeces.dol. per lb_. Suiting, unfinished worsted, 3 oz. (at mill) dol. per yd.. Women's dress goods, French serge, 54" (at factory) dol. per yd._ Worsted yarn, 2/32s, crossbred stock, Boston - dol. per lb Receipts at Boston, total A thous. of lb.. Domestic...thous. of lb.. ForeignA - thous. of lb.. Stocks, scoured basis, end of quarter:*j Total thous. of lb.. Domestic thous. of lb.. Foreign thous. of lb.. Combing thous. of lb Clothing - thous. of lb_. MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS Buttons, fresh-water pearl: pet. of capacity.. Stocks, end of month thous. of gross.. Fur, sales by dealersf thous. of dol.. Pyroxylin-coated textiles (artificial leather): Orders, unfilled, end of month thous. linear yd_. Pyroxylin spread thous. of lb.. Shipments, billed thous. of linear yd.. &,68» 25, 92 23, , 478 2,6 3, 6. 7,46 v 2,9 2,4 6,8 5, 78, , 5 23, ,525 I, 6,722 a.5. 9 «7, 35 2,58 2,592 5,25 4, > 72, 9 > 27, 528 8, ,24,9 8, ,36, 2, 3 4,52 4, 73,367 * 27, 73 8, ,8 5,285 7,59 6,299, 3 9,96 7,53 44, ,5,224 2,54 3,8 3,5 73,98 28, 223 2, , 524 6,4, ,925 2,4 2,33 3, 3, 6 64, b 24, 4 2, * 53,46 6 2,369 25, «> 55, 387 b 2, 5 23, l.ioi ;.H , 58 4,576 4, ,6 3,76,943 3,4 3, , 258 4,5 7, 43 5, 96 6, , 3 6, , ,9 4,45 2,4 5,2 4,6 6 I ,4 6,7 4, ,3 4,53 2, 459 5,647 5,8 b 46, 5 * 7,294 7, , 599 2, 76 3,8 5.2 j 8,46 3,857 2,273 5,423 5,3 * 54, 533» 2, 7, , 42 5,424 3,997 47, 57, 8 36,59 98, 3, ,6 3,33 2, 4, 4,68 b 68, 78 * 24, 697 6, m , 78 64, 3 2, ,69 3,433 2,46 4,6 4,5 6 63, ,5 7, ,694 2,, , 3,5 2, 5,3 4,972 f> 6, ,477 9, ,56 3,53 3,4 25, 94 99,6 26,339 8,967 43, ,55 2,8 6,87 5,232 TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT AIRPLANES, totalt - number Commercial (licensed)t Military (deliveries) For export.- -.number._ AUTOMOBILES Exports: Canada: Automobiles, assembled, total- Passenger cars United States: Automobiles, assembled, totals Passenger carsc?... Trueksc? Financing: Retail purchasers, total thous. of dol.. New cars thous. of dol.. Used cars thous. of dol Unclassified thous. of dol Wholesale (manufacturers to dealers) thous. of dol_. 2,6, 2 6, 72 9,4 6,6,696 58,4 4, , , 2, ,576 4,87 4, 58 3, 529 7,47 22, 49 7,9 8,38, 42,79 3,22 7 9,9 6, 53 28, 78,97 I 32, ,55 3,639 28,2 7,736, , 58 64, 3, , 728 «23 j "39 a 55 I a 5! 39 8! 25 6,67 5,43 I 25,4 : 5,7 9,787 56, 2 3,8 4,573 3,537 25, 9 6,46 9, 87,69 55, 232 3, ,872 I 3, Revised. p Preliminary. #See footnote on p. 37 of this Issue, * Since July 4 report has been on a weekly basis. Data for and 4, March, June,, and, and, April, and July are for 5 weeks; other months, 4 weeks. Figures for July 4 and succeeding months are computed from Census Bureau figures so as to represent percent of she wool industry; earlier figures incomplete. New series. Wool stock series began in June 4. See p. 2 of the July issue for earlier data and explanation of new wool consumption series. Beginning with the July 4 report the statistics are reported on the basis of 4 and 5 weeks, the weekly distribution being determined by the Saturdays. The statistics presented herewith are still based on the pre-code computed flbrmal (currently based on the single-shift performance over the 5-year period ). The current data represent practically complete coverage of the industry. Since 4 no allowance has been made for holidays. AForeign receipts beginning 4 are compiled by U. S. Department of Agriculture and are not comparable with data carried through 3. This results in a total figure which also is not comparable with earlier data. ^Compiled by the Bureau of the Census and represent stocks of raw wool held by all dealers, topmakers, and manufacturers who usually hold significant stocks of wool. The figures for the 3 quarters of 4 have been revised to include the "grade not stated." J Grease equivalent of shorn wool, plus actual weight of pulled wool. Conversions are based on totals; scoured wool Is multiplied by 2 and pulled wool by \\i. Includes clothing and carpet wools. See note on apparel class wool on p. 2 of the July issue. As this grease series will probably be dropped in favor of the more accurate scoured series, it is suggested that those who wish to keep series going have their names placed on Bureau of the Census mailing list for the monthly wool consumption report, from which can be computed the present data, using formula given. For 2 revisions see p. 53 of the June 3 issue, for 3 revisions see p. 2 of the 4 issue, and for 4 see p. 2 of the issue d Data revised for 2, see p. 54 of the June 3 issue. Data revised for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue; and for 4, p. 9 of the issue. JIndex of sales of new passenger cars is shown on p. 26 of this issue. tdata for revised (airplanes). See p. 58 of the April issue. Fur sales revised for, see p. 58 of the July Issue. <S>Of the 2 identical organizations reporting originally 8 discontinued financing in, 2 in, 2 in March, 5 in June, in July, 2 in August, in, la, and 2 in, « ,63,67 28,92 8, 92 9,999 43, 55 94, 4, , ,726 3,8 26, 53 7,723 8,33 72,9 6, , 98, a 297 " , 222 3,945 28, 5 7, 727, 8 76,36 6, , 6,5 8,6 "38 a ,424 3,438 24,42 4, 987 9,55, 55 25, 96 59,,28, ,545 3,37 22, 525 2, 9,8 68, 685 2,7 54, 98 9, ,44 2,335 5, 728 8,323 7,45 4, 436 9, 26, , ,54 2,53,9 4,564 6,3 22,58 76,3 44, ,34

61 Digitized for FRASER SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS 59 Monthly statistics through, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey Novem- jdecem* ber ber TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Continued March April May June July ' August AUTOMOBILES-Continued Fire-extinguishing equipment:t Shipments: Motor-vehicle apparatus Hand-type : Automobiles: Canada, total... Passenger cars United States, totalt number. number- number. number. number- Passenger carsf number- Trucks t number. Automobile rims thous. of rims. Registrations: New passenger carsf number- New commercial cars*. number. Sales: General Motors Corporation: To consumers. number- To dealers, total number. U. S. dealers number- Shipments, accessories and parts, total* Jan. 925=. Accessories, original equipment Jan. 925=. Accessories to wholesalers_.jan. 925=. Replacement parts Jan. 925=. Service equipment Jan. 925=. RAILWAY EQUIPMENT Equipment condition: Freight cars owned; Capacity Number, total Bad order, total Percent of total in bad order Locomotives, railway: Owned: mills, of lb thousands.. Tractive power. mills, of lb. Number.. Awaiting classified repairs- Percent of total Installed Retired Passenger cars: On railroads (end of quarter).. Equipment manufacturing: Freight cars: Orders, new.. cars.. Orders, unfilled, total.ears E quipment manufacturers cars. _ Railroad shops.cars.. Shipments, total cars._ Domestic cars.. Locomotives, industrial electric (quarterly): Shipments, total. Mining use number. _ Locomotives, railway: Orders, new number. _ Orders, unfilled, end of month: Equipment manufacturers (Census), total number. _ Domestic, total... number._ Electric- Steam _ number. _ Railroad shops (A. A. R.)_.. Shipments: Domestic, total. Electric Steam Exports, totalf Electric Steam..- number. _ Passenger cars: Orders, new, placed by railroads Orders, unfilled (end of quarter) Shipments, total.. Domestic _ number. _ ELECTRIC TRUCKS AND TRACTORS Shipments, industrial, total Domestic Exports 64 34, 39 5, 36. 4, , 8 9,6 33,94,7 7,39 4, 27 44, 2 9, , , 79,7 226, 3. 2, 44,285 7, , 3 3, 29 7,25 6,4 5, 25 5, ,556 27, , 56 8,273 s 3,49 3,7 6,!,96 i,6 272,43 I 3,59. 44, ,94 343,22 58,733 ' 58,45 6,56,4!,,92, 3 i 22, 2! 237,94 43,243! 37,! 38, 68,5 j 36,859! 22,98 i 2,34 27,54 I,4 I 85,698 i 58,572 97,6 47,9 j 5, i 3, ; i 25 4,4 2,798, 69,5, i 6 ' 7 i 78,25 76,727 i,772 73, 57,2 :,7,87,79 273,25 } 269,9 j 2, , ,22 2,2 45,6 ; 45,5,87!, ! ,432 4,54,98,28, : i : 4 2 ' \ , ,26 45,3 9, ,59,3 2, 5,224 \ 7,49,92 i,92 72 j I 24 j 23 I > io! 26 j ' 38 32, , ,4 298, 2,73,877 25,7 43, ,99 45,79 9, ,5,35 4,444 6, S ,2 3,268, , 224,, 79,26 76,8 4,3 96,34 44,8 6, ,9,7 254, ,97 45, 9, ,236 2, 9 4,52 8, , 23 8,2 4, 4 42, , , 4, 3, 272 5,87 8, 7 96, 72, ,,78 249, ,94 45, 9 9, ,99 7 3,478 5,47 8,7 RQ loy , 3 24, 2,247 52, 7 47,33 85,642 2, ,9 57, 2,7 229,467 94, ,46, , , 44,9 9, , 5,6 7,35 8,6 9 ifis Z, loo 2, , 542 2,6 6, 3 46, 5 385,57,58,96 392,, 94, 8 222,63 87, ,34,776 26, , 44,5 9, ,677 22,964 4, 646 8,38 2, 54 2, I 9! 5 i 56 35, 6, 4 3,26 452,5 3,4 77,6, ,423 56,, 6 27,, ,52, , , 44, 2 9, ,32 25, 3 5,97 9,44 2,72 2, j 67 38, 56,4 8,92 44, ,42 68, 597,76 357,49 63, 6 63, ,6 77, ,33, , ,85 44,6 8, ,469 24, 373 5,92 9,28,, , 573 4, 3,5 27,29 29,4 6, ,92 59, , 2,943 99, , 4, , 4.7 2, 44,564 8, ,225 2, 53 2,924 7, 3,854 3, 3 «« ,5 4, 5 2, 35,3 9, , 533,4 28,6 54,6 85, 2 9,2 4, , 7,763 24, ,79 «44,45 8, , 92-39,7 Revised. *New series. For earlier data see p. 2 of the 4 issue for total shipments, accessories and parts, and registrations of new commercial cars frevised series. For earlier data see p. 9 of the August 3 issue for fire extinguishers and passenger-car registrations; exports of locomotives for 2- p 55 of the June, 3 issue for 3, see p. 2 of the 4 issue, and for 4 p. 9 of this issue. Data on automobile production revised for 3. 4 issue. For revised data for 4 see pp. 55 and 56 of the June issue. Data for and through March revised. See p. 59 of the June issue. Taxicabs are included in figures for passenger cars, beginning 4 in order to avoid disclosure of individual companies. United States and Canadian dealers, plus overseas shipment. 3, 8, 434,787 6,647 4,964 4, » See p. 55 of the August

62 » > 6 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS Monthly statistics through,, in the 2 Annual Supplement to the Survey ber TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Continued March April May j June July Augu? Sepiem SHIPBUILDING United States: Merchant vessels: Under construction.thous. of gross tons Completed during month, total gross tons Steel.. total gross tons. World (quarterly): Launched: Number ships. Tonnage thous. of gross tons. Under construction: Number ships Tonnage. thous. of gross tons 77 9,2,77 4,67 2, 9 36, 8, , , 576, ,429 7,297 2,8 3,3! , 54 2,32 8,24 24, 442 5, ,4 2, j 5, 23 i 22 5,949 ; 4. IIS, , Ill CANADIAN STATISTICS* Business indexes:* Physical volume of business =.. Industrial production, total..926=.. Construction^*- 926=.. Electric power 926=.. Manufacturing _ 926=.. Forestry - 926=.. Miningt-- 926=.. Distribution 926=.. Carloadings...926=.. Exports (volume) X 926=.. Imports (volume) 926=.. Trade employment 926=.. Agricultural marketing..926=.. Grain marketings 926=.. Livestock marketings 926=.. Commodity prices: Cost of living index J 926=.. Wholesale price index#. 926=- Employment,total(first of month). 926=.. Construction and maintenance. 926= Manufacturing 926=.. Mining =.. Service =..! Trade 926=..) Transportation 926=.. j Finance:! Banking: i Bank debits mills, of dol. Interest rates..926=... Commercial failures*! Security issues and prices: New bond issues, total t thous.of dol..i Bond yields. - percent I Common stock prices, totalt-926=..! Foreign trade: j Exports!... thous. of dol.i Imports _._-._-.,-thous. of dol.j Exports, volume: i Wheat thous. of bu.. Wheat flour..thous. of bbl. Railway statistics: Carloadings... thous. of cars.. Financial results: Operating revenues. thous. of dol_- Operating expenses thous. of dol_. Operating income thous. of dol. Operating results: Freight carried mile mills of tons.. Passengers carried mile-mills of pass.. Commodity statistics: : Electrical energy, central stations j mills, of kw.-hr_. Pig iron thous. of long tons.. Steel ingots and castings thous. of long tons.. Wheat flour thous. of bbl.j , , ,3 5, 87 26, , , , , , 28, , , 598 7,73 2,7 8 2,63 46 I, J ,22 j 2, i 2 47, , , 8 26, , ,245 38, 569 7, ,54! 26,6 2,854! 2,333 5,29 4,2 2,24 I, I 29.9! 8. I 35.9! 77.9 i 2.992! 85.5 j 4 I 64,4! 4,59 7,557 i ,234 2,44!,763 7 i 2,9 6 l i j 96.2 I.3 j.2 i 4.8 I 78.4 I l 27.3 I ! 72.5! 98.4!.4 i 98.5 i ' 2.6! , ,3! 38, ;,798! 4,597! 4,24 I 34 : 8 22,597 i 2,87 339, 7,8 56 i, S i.3!.4 I ! 24.2!.5!.3!. j 8.4 I 72.4 i ! 99.5! 29. i 7.5 I 23.! 78.9 ; 2,599! 77.3! 3 23,332 ' !,5 52,68 I 3,46 : 477! 92 I 25,535 22,4 ;,94 ; 2,56 j 26! 2,35 i 54 :, I 22.3 i 6. i 24.! 87.2 i 7.7 i.8! 23.9!.7! , , , ,27 6, 2 28! 26,5 22,32 2,5 2,8 25 2, , ,979 ' 76.6! 9 46,576! 9,79! ! 3.8 ;,55! 59,2! 27,37 : 449 i 9 : 27,22 23,7!,3 I,99 I 28! 2, 59, , ! 79,942! 57,598 j 25,764 ; 43 ; 2 26,49! 24,49 I 2,7 I 2,29 I 56 ; i, , , , , 25, , 3 25, , , (i SI , 7 2, , , * 2 "57 3* , 26, 2, ] d " s 3 5 < : C ( *9. X 52. 9* >( 2' 2, , 56 d Deficit. Revised. Statistics in this section, with few exceptions, are from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. ^Data for 4 revised. See p. 56 of the May issue. *New series. For earlier data see p. 8 of the 3 issue, business indexes, and p. 2 of the 3 issue, commercial failures. frevised series. See p. 55 of the April 4 issue, construction and mining, for 3. Series on common-stock prices revised back to 2 as a result of additional stocks being added; for revision see p. 56 of the April 4 issue. New bond issues revised for the year ; see p. 6 of the April issue. INumber of commodities changed from 52 to 567 beginning with month of 4. d"data revised 2 through July 3. Revision for 2 see p. 55 of the 3 issue. For final revisions for 3 see p. 56 of the 4 issue. AData for revised. For revisions see p. 6 of the May issue. JData on exports, both index numbers and absolute figures revised beginning April 3 to include nonmonetary gold. Revisions not shown in the July issue will appear in a subsequent issue. Series revised beginning 924. Revisions not shown in the issue will appear in a subsequent issue. Digitized for FRASER U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:

63 INDEX TO MONTHLY BUSINESS STATISTICS Page Abrasive paper and cloth. 54 Acceptances 3, 32 Accessories automobile 59 Advertising , 26 Africa, United States trade with. _ 37 Agricultural products, cash income received from marketings of 23 Agricultural wages, loans _ 3 Air-conditioning equipment 5 Air mails 26 Airplanes - 38, 58 Alcohol, denatured, ethyl, methanol 39 Aluminum 52 Animal fats, greases 39,4 Anthracite industry 22, 29,45,46 Apparel, wearing _ 28,3,57 Argentina, United States trade with; exchange; flaxseed stock 33,37,4 Asia, United States trade with 37 Asphalt _ 47 Automobiles _ 22, 26, 27, 28, 3, 58, 59 Babbitt metal 52 Barley - 43 Bathroom fixtures - 5 Beef and veal.- 44 Beverages, fermented malt liquors and distilled spirits.. 42 Bituminous coal 22, 3, 46 Boilers and boiler fittings 5 Bonds, prices, sales, value, yields 35,36 Book, publication.. 54 Boxes, paper, shipping 54 Brass _ 53 Brazil, coffee; exchange; United States trade with ,37,45 Brick Brokers' loans 32 Bronze 53 Building contracts awarded 24, 25 Building costs. 25 Building materials _,49 Business activity index (Annalist) 22 Business failures 32,33 Butter 42 Canadian statistics 6 Candy Canal traffic 38 Capital issues 35 Carloadings. 22,37,38 Cattle and calves 44 Cellulose plastic products 4 Cement _ 22, 27, 28, 3, 56 Chain-store sales.. 26, 27 Cheese Chile, exchange, United States trade with.. 33,37 Cigars and cigarettes 45 Civil-service employees 29 Clay products ,27,28,3,56 Clothing 24,28,3,57 Coal._ - 22,29,45,46 Cocoa Coffee 23,24,45 Coke - 46 Collections, department stores.. 26 Commercial paper, 3, 32 Communications - 38 Construction: Contracts awarded, indexes 24 Costs 25 Highways 25 Wage rates _ 3 Copper 52 Copper wire cloth 53 Copra and coconut oil 4 Corn 43 Cost-of-living index. 23 Cotton, raw and manufactures 23, 24, 57 Cottonseed, cake and meal, oil 4 Crops _ -_ 23,4,42,43,57 Dairy products 23, 24,42 Debits, bank 32 Debt, United States Government. 34 Delaware, employment, pay rolls 28, 3 Department-store sales and stocks 27 Deposits, bank. 32 Disputes, labor 29 Dividend payments 36 Douglas fir Earnings, factory 29,3,3 Eggs - 23,44 Electrical equipment 52, 53 Electric power, production, sales, revenues. 22, 4 Electric railways 37 Employment: Cities and States 28, 29 Factory _ 27, 28, 29 Nonmanufacturing 29 Miscellaneous. 29 Emigration 38 Enameled ware 5 Engineering construction 25 England, exchange; United States trade with - 33,37 Exchange rates, foreign 33 Expenditures, United States Government. _ 34 Explosives 39 Exports _ 36,37 Factory employment, pay rolls.. 27, 28, 29, 3, 3 Failures, commercial 32,33 Digitized for FRASER Fairchild retail price index - Fares, street railways Farm employees Farm prices, index Federal Government, finance. Page Federal-aid highways. 25, 29 Federal Reserve banks, condition of 32 Federal Reserve member bank statistics 32 Fertilizers 39 Fire-extinguishing equipment _. 59 Fire losses. 25 Fish and fish oils 4, 45 Flaxseed 4 Flooring, oak, maple, beech, and birch Flour, wheat 43 Food products 22-25, 28, 3, 42 Footwear _ 47,, 55 Foreclosures, real estate 25 Foreign trade, indexes, values 36,37 Foundry equipment 5 France, exchange; United States trade with. 33, 37 Freight cars (equipment) 38, 59 Freight carloadings, cars, indexes 37 Freight-car surplus 38 Fruits 23,42 Fuel equipment.._ 5 Fuels... _ 45,46,47 Furniture 49 Gas, customers, sales, revenues 4 Gas and fuel oils Gasoline 46 General Motors sales 59 Glass and glassware 22, 27, 28,3, 56 Gloves and mittens. 47 Gold 34 Goods in warehouses _ 26 Grains _ 23, 24,43 Gypsum 56 Heels, rubber 55 Hides and skins 24,47 Hogs 44 Home loan banks, loans outstanding 25 Home Owners' Loan Corporation 25 Hosiery. 57 Hotels 29, 3, 38 Housing _. 23 Illinois, employees, factory earnings 28, 3, 3 Imports 37 Income-tax receipts 34 Incorporations, business 26 Industrial production, indexes 22 Installment sales, New England 27 Insurance, life 33 Interest payment 36 Interest rates 32 Investments Federal Reserve member banks. 32 Iron, ore; crude; manufactures 22,49 Italy, exchange; United States trade with.. 33, 37 Japan, exchange; United States trade with. 33, 37 Kerosene 47 Labor turn-over, disputes 29 Lamb and mutton 44 Lard _ 44 Lead _. 52 Leather 22-24,28,3,47 Leather, artificial _ 58 Liberty bonds 35 Linseed oil, cake, and meal 4 Livestock 23, 24,44 Loans, agricultural, brokers', time, real estate. _ 3,32 Locomotives 59 Looms, woolen, activity 58 Lubricating oil 47 Lumber 22, 24, 27-29,,49 Lumber yard, sales, stocks Machine activity, cotton, silk, wool 57, 58 Machine tools, orders 5 Machinery 27, 28,3,5,52 Magazine advertising 25 Manufacturing indexes 22 Marketings, agricultural 23 Maryland, employment, pay rolls 3,3 Massachusetts, employment, pay rolls 3, 3 Meats 44 Metals 22-24, 27, 28, 29, 3, Methanol _. 39 Mexico: Silver production 34 United States trade with 37 Milk 42 Minerals 22,45,52 Money in circulation 34 National Industrial Recovery Act, highway construction 25 Naval stores Netherlands, exchange 33 New Jersey, employment, pay rolls 29-3 Newsprint 54 New York, employment, pay rolls, canal traffic 28-3,38 New York Stock Exchange 35,36 Notes in circulation 32 Oats. 43 Oceania, United States trade with 37 Ohio, employment 29 Ohio River traffic 38 Oils and fata 39,4 Oleomargarine 4 Page Paints 4 Paper and pulp 22, 23, 28, 3, 53, 54 Passenger-car sales index 26 Passengers, street railways; Pullman 37,38 Passports issued 38 Pay rolls: Factory 29 Factory, by cities and States 3 Nonmanufacturing industries 3 Pennsylvania, employment, pay rolls 29,3 Petroleum and products 22, 24, 28-3, Pig iron 22,49 Pork 44 Postal business 26 Postal savings 32 Poultry 23,44 Prices: Cost of living, indexes 23 Farm indexes 23 Retail indexes 23 Wholesale indexes 24 World, foodstuffs and raw material 24 Printing _ 22, 54, industrial 22 Profits, corporation. 34 Public finance 34 Public utilities _ 29,36 Pullman Co 38 Pumps 5, 52 Purchasing power of the dollar 24 Radiators 5 Radio, advertising 25 Railways; operations, equipment, financial statistics 37, 38, 59, 6 Railways, street 37 Rayon _ 57 Reconstruction Finance Corporation, loans outstanding 34 Refrigerators, household 52 Registrations, automobiles 59 Rents (housing), index.. 23 Retail trade: Automobiles, new, passenger 26 Chain stores: 5-and- (variety) 26 Grocery 26 Department stores 27 Mail order 27 Rural general merchandise 27 Roofing _ 4 Rice 43 Rubber, crude; scrap; clothing; footwear; tires 22-24, 28, 3, 55 Rye 43 Sanitary ware 5 Savings deposits 32 Sheep and lambs 44 Shipbuilding 22, 27, 28, 3, 6 Shoes 22,24,28,3,47, Silk 22, 23, 24, 57 Silver 22,34 Sons 47 Softwoods Spain, exchange 33 Spindle activity, cotton 57 Steel, crude; manufactures 22,49,5 Stockholders 36 Stock indexes, domestic and world 23 Stocks, department stores 27 Stocks (see individual commodities). Stocks, issues, prices, sales 36 Stone, clay, and glass products. 22, 23, 27, 28, 3, 56 Sugar 23, 24, 45 Sulphur 39 Sulphuric acid 39 Superphosphate 39 Tea 23, 24,45 Telephones and telegraphs 38 Terneplate 5 Terra cotta 56 Textiles, miscellaneous products 58 Tile, hollow building 56 Timber Tin and terneplate 23, 24,5 Tires 22,24,28,3,55 Tobacco 22,25,28,3,45 Tools, machine 5 Trade unions, employment 29 Travel 38 Trucks and tractors, industrial electric 59 United Kingdom, exchange; United States trade with 33, 37 Uruguay, exchange 33 United States Steel Corporation 3,36, 5 Utilities 29, 3,34, 35,36,4, 59 Vacuum cleaners 52 Variety-store sales index. 26 Vegetable oils 39,4 Vegetables 23,42 Wages 3 Warehouses, space occupied Waterway traffic 38 Wheat and wheat flour 23, 24,43 Wholesale prices 24 Wisconsin, employment, pay rolls 29,3,3 Wood pulp._ 53 Wool 22,58 Zinc 22,52

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